Patents Myriad

News & Analysis as of

News from Abroad: Not One But Two Decisions Fine Tune the Australian Patent Office's Approach to Life Science Technologies

Two recent Australian Patent Office decisions have provided clarity as to the patentability of isolated nucleic acid sequences following the High Court's decision in D'Arcy v Myriad Genetics ('Myriad'). The first decision is...more

Patenting in Canada: Do These Genes Fit?

The Supreme Court of Canada has commented on the issue but no Canadian court has directly answered the difficult question of whether genes are patentable. So the answer appears to be yes, for now. Identifying genetic...more

Patent Rights in the U.S.: Is the Pendulum Finally Swinging Back to Center?

The U.S. patent system has long struggled to strike a balance that both encourages patent rights and prevents patent abuse. Finding that balance requires giving patent owners the right amount of patent enforcement power,...more

D. Mass Court Extends Myriad to Peptide Panels

In a great leap backwards for patenting life sciences, Magistrate Judge Cabell invalidated claims in a number of patents licensed to Oxford Immunotec that are directed to e.g., “A kit for diagnosing infection in a human host...more

The Genetics of Gender Discrimination in Date Palm Patenting

You’re driving south out of Indio along the Grapefruit Boulevard towards Thermal and Mecca because their names sound promising.  A parched desert plain extends to your left, leading up to the austere ridgelines of Joshua Tree...more

Top Stories of 2015: #11 to #15

After reflecting upon the events of the past twelve months, Patent Docs presents its ninth annual list of top patent stories. For 2015, we identified twenty stories that were covered on Patent Docs last year that we believe...more

Patenting “Natural Products” Down-Under Post-Myriad

Although the Australian High Court held that claims to naturally occurring DNA (e.g., BRCA1 nucleic acid) were not patent eligible because they were not a “manner of manufacture,” since the encoded information therein was not...more

Australian Patent Office guidelines finalised post-Myriad

The Australian Patent Office has now finalised what will be their approach to examining nucleic acids and other biological inventions following the decision handed down by the High Court in D'Arcy v Myriad Genetics Inc [2015]...more

What impact will the Australian Myriad decision have on patent eligibility of diagnostic tests?

By now most will know that: (a) Australia’s final appeal Court has made adverse findings against Myriad’s patent for utilising the BRCA1 locus to diagnose breast cancer; (b) the rejected claims are only those that...more

Australian Patent Office Proposes “Coding Only” Sequence Ban

Coming soon after the High Court’s “Myriad decision” in Australia, the Australian Patent Office has proposed guidelines that would effectively limit the ban on patent-eligibility of DNA sequences to nucleic acids that code...more

Can a natural product still be patented in Australia?

Yes. While various commentaries have suggested that patentable subject matter will be restricted in Australia under the recent High Court Myriad decision to exclude naturally occurring products (whether or not isolated), my...more

Can we patent products found in nature? It's complicated. An update on Australia's Myriad decision...

It remains to be seen if this new Myriad decision in Australia will be extended as it was in the U.S. to prevent virtually any product found in nature from being patented....more

What did the Australian High Court actually say about the patent eligibility of cDNA?

As the dust from the impact of the Australian Myriad decision begins to settle, now is the time to revisit what many have said regarding patent eligibility of cDNA, against what the final appeal Court actually said. On...more

“Does a nucleic acid constitute patent eligible subject matter under Australia law?”

That is the question that we hoped Australia’s final appeal Court to have answered in the Myriad decision that it handed down last week. Some observers have been quite forthright on the point: ‘Yes, the High Court of...more

Does a Nucleic Acid Constitute Patent Eligible Subject Matter Under Australian Law?

Clearly the High Court has given an answer to a question, but was that question the one we anticipated? That in itself is an open question!...more

Australian High Court Rules Gene Patents Unpatentable

Like the United States Supreme Court, the High Court of Australia has determined that Myriad’s patents directed to purified and isolated DNA molecules encoding the BRCA genes are unpatentable. Indeed, the Australian Court...more

USPTO Report on State of Confirmatory Genetic Testing Comes off the Waffle Iron

In 2011—after the Fed. Cir. decision in Myriad upholding claims to BRACA1 and 2 genes—the PTO was tasked by a section of the AIA with providing Congress with a report on the effect of patenting on confirmatory genetic...more

Life Sciences Alert: High Court of Australia unanimously decides that isolated genetic material is not patentable in Australia

In D'Arcy v Myriad Genetics Inc [2015] HCA 35 (D'Arcy v Myriad) the High Court of Australia has unanimously held (by way of three separate judgments: majority decision (French CJ, Kiefel, Bell, and Keane JJ) and two...more

News from Abroad: Australian High Court Has Ruled in Myriad Gene Patent Case

The Australian High Court yesterday unanimously overturned six lower court judges and dismissed some very careful reasoning to not only follow the U.S. Supreme Court in invalidating claims to the BRCA1 and 2 gene sequences,...more

News from Abroad: High Court Rules Myriad's BRCA Genes Not Patentable Subject Matter in Australia

Just over one year after the Full Federal Court of Australia unanimously upheld an earlier Federal Court decision that naturally occurring nucleic acid molecules are patentable in Australia, the High Court of Australia has...more

Physiology/Medicine Nobels Awarded for Discoveries of “Natural Products”

In re Roslin Institute, a Fed. Cir. panel consisting of Judges Dyk, Moore and Wallach ruled that methods of isolating cffDNA were not patent eligible. Judge Dyk, writing for the panel endorsed the “markedly different”...more

Australia High Court Rules Against Gene Patents

Colleagues in Australia have been spreading the bad news: The High Court of Australia followed the lead (?) of the U.S. Supreme Court and determined that Myriad cannot patent the isolated BRCA1 gene in Australia. Thanks to...more

News from Abroad: Isolated Nucleic Acids Not Patentable in Australia

D'Arcy v. Myriad Genetics Inc & Anor [2015] HCA 35 - The High Court of Australia today handed down its decision in D'Arcy v Myriad, deciding once and for all that isolated nucleic acids do not define patent-eligible...more

News from Abroad: Isolated Gene Sequences Suffer A Cruel Fate in the Hands of the High Court of Australia

D'Arcy v Myriad Genetics Inc [2015] HCA 35 - The High Court of Australia has today handed down its decision in D'Arcy v Myriad Genetics Inc [2015] HCA 35, unanimously striking down the validity of the first three claims...more

High Court of Australia determines isolated BRCA1 gene not patentable in Australia

The High Court of Australia has unanimously overturned previous decisions from lower courts and has held that certain claims to Myriad's patent for isolated BRCA1 nucleic acid molecules are not patentable in Australia...more

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