Protected Concerted Activity Hiring & Firing

The phrase "Protected Concerted Activity" refers to certain protected activities specified in the National Labor Relations Act of 1935. Under the NLRA, covered employees may join together to improve... more +
The phrase "Protected Concerted Activity" refers to certain protected activities specified in the National Labor Relations Act of 1935. Under the NLRA, covered employees may join together to improve their wages and working conditions. If employees are engaged in "protected concerted activity" and suffer adverse employment consequences, such employees may seek redress under the NLRA, whether or not they are members of a union.  less -
News & Analysis as of

"Likes" on Facebook are Protected Employee Conduct

The United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit recently upheld a National Labor Relations Board (Board) decision holding that a sports bar violated the National Labor Relations Act (Act) when it discharged...more

The Second Circuit “Likes” the NLRB’s Reasoning

In recent years, the National Labor Relations Board has tended to protect employees’ social media activity against employers. A few weeks ago, the Second Circuit upheld a decision of the National Labor Relations Board...more

Before You Fire: 20 Questions Every Employer Should Ask

Here are 20 questions that every employer should ask itself before going ahead with a termination. If you think I’ve missed anything, please feel free to add your own in the comments....more

Employment Law Letter - Fall 2015

Workplace Speech Protections Refined by Connecticut Supreme Court. We don’t generally report on developments that will likely be of more interest to lawyers than clients, but a recent decision from our state’s Supreme...more

Court “Likes” NLRB’s determination that Facebook posts are protected under the NLRA

The Second Circuit Court of Appeals recently upheld the National Labor Relations Board’s (NLRB) decision that employees’ Facebook posts are protected by the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA). Three D, LLC d/b/a Triple Play...more

Second Circuit Sides With NLRB In Facebook Dispute

As employees continue to flock to social media in droves, employers have been craving additional guidance about how, if at all, they can regulate work-related posts. While it is no secret that employees in unionized and...more

Second Circuit Upholds NLRB Decision: Discharge of Employees for Facebook “Likes” Was Unlawful

On October 22, 2015, the Second Circuit Court of Appeals affirmed the National Labor Relations Board’s (NLRB) decision that Triple Play Sports Bar and Grille (Employer) violated Section 8(a)(1) of the National Labor Relations...more

Second Circuit Says Facebook Profanity Directed at Employer is Protected - Employer Violated NLRA by Terminating Two Employees...

In Three D, LLC d/b/a/ Triple Play Sports Bar and Grille v. NLRB, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit upheld the National Labor Relations Board's (the Board) determination that the employer, Triple Play,...more

Second Circuit Finds Facebook “Likes” Protected Under NLRA

On October 21, 2015, the Second Circuit clarified in Triple Play Sports Bar and Grille v. National Labor Relations Board that protections provided under Section 7 of the National Labor Relations Act (“NLRA”) encompass...more

Second Circuit Upholds That Facebook "Likes" Can Be Protected, Concerted Activity

On October 21, 2015, the Second Circuit upheld the National Labor Relations Board’s (NLRB) earlier ruling that clicking the Facebook “Like” button can be protected concerted activity. The Triple Play Sports Bar & Grill fired...more

“Like” It or Not, It’s Protected Activity Under the NLRA

If I’ve heard it once, I’ve heard it a million times: “It’s employment at will in this state. I can fire my employees for any reason or no reason at all.” Well, if that “any reason” or “no reason” has something to do with...more

Second Circuit Holds Facebook “Likes” Protected by NLRA

Recently, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit (“Second Circuit”) released a summary order and held that an employee’s “like” on Facebook can be protected by the National Labor Relations Act (“NLRA”)....more

Employment Law - October 2015 #2

Take the Cure: New California Law Permits Corrections of Wage Statement Violations - Why it matters: Employers may want to review their wage statements after Governor Jerry Brown signed a new law that permits them...more

Socially Aware: The Social Media Law Update Volume 6, Issue 4

Five social media law issues to discuss with your clients - The explosive growth of social media has clients facing legal questions that didn’t even exist a few short years ago. Helping your clients navigate this...more

Blocked: Managing Social Media at Work Under Virginia’s New Privacy Law

With social media pervading all facets of society (no less than 67 percent of Americans are regular users), businesses have long been concerned with their employees’ potentially detrimental social media activities. As these...more

To Follow or Not To Follow … (Social Media in the Workplace—Part 1 of 2)

You’re reading a blog post, and thus need no primer on the prevalence of social media. But you may not be aware of the pitfalls facing employers that use, monitor, or implement policies regarding social media....more

NLRB Expands “Joint Employer” Definition

In a pivotal decision on August 27, the National Labor Relations Board “refined” its test for determining joint-employer status, broadening the scope of employers subject to joint collective bargaining and concerted activity...more

Hold that Friend Request: Legal Traps in a Post-Facebook Work Environment

Many well-meaning managers engage with employees on social media websites, and doing so provides a host of benefits: stronger relationships between employees and management; a sense of collegiality; instant updates on...more

If You Can't Fire A Teacher For Criticizing Management, Who Can You Fire?

Most school administrators would be shocked to learn that the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) could, in some circumstances, find that their school engaged in an unfair labor practice for disciplining or terminating an...more

NLRB Says Employer Cannot Rescind Contract for Employee Who Wrote Complaining Email to Co-Workers

As previously reported in EmployNews, recent National Labor Relations Board decisions have disrupted established guidelines with regard to employers’ obligations to tolerate uncivil and insulting behavior and comments from...more

The NLRB Expands Employee Protections Yet Again: Will There Be Anything Left Not Considered Protected Concerted Activity?

Continuing a trend we’ve reported on in previous blog posts, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) recently handed down yet another decision expanding the protections afforded to employees under the National Labor...more

Is Posting Obscenities Aimed At Supervisor On Facebook A Terminable Offense?

Maybe not, according to a recently published NLRB decision. In Pier Sixty LLC, a majority of a three-member NLRB panel affirmed an ALJ’s decision that the employer violated Section 8(a)(1) and (3) of the National Labor...more

NLRB determines vulgar Facebook posts protected concerted activity

The National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) determined that Pier Sixty LLC, a New York catering service, violated federal labor law by firing an employee server after he posted a Facebook message protesting supervisory abuse...more

New Year: Resolve, Review, Revise

The new year is a time for reflection. With that reflection often comes a resolve for change, from small modifications of some old habits to wholesale new beginnings and everything in between. From a business perspective,...more

The Employment Law Authority - December 2014

In This Issue: - Justices Issue Pro-Employer Rulling in FLSA Case - Ogletree Deakins Named A "Law Firm of the Year" - California Mandates Anti-Bullying Training for Supervisors - OFCCP Issues Final...more

57 Results
|
View per page
Page: of 3

"My best business intelligence, in one easy email…"

Your first step to building a free, personalized, morning email brief covering pertinent authors and topics on JD Supra:

Sign up to create your digest using LinkedIn*

*By using the service, you signify your acceptance of JD Supra's Privacy Policy.

Already signed up? Log in here

*With LinkedIn, you don't need to create a separate login to manage your free JD Supra account, and we can make suggestions based on your needs and interests. We will not post anything on LinkedIn in your name. Or, sign up using your email address.
×