Racial Discrimination Supreme Court of the United States

News & Analysis as of

The U.S. Supreme Court’s Decision in Texas Department of Housing & Community Affairs v. Inclusive Communities Project, Inc.

In Texas Department of Housing & Community Affairs v. Inclusive Communities Project, Inc., 576 U.S. ___, 2015 WL 2473449 (Jun. 25, 2015), the U.S. Supreme Court, in a 5-4 decision, held that disparate impact discrimination...more

U.S. Supreme Court Finds Disparate Impact Claims Cognizable Under FHA

This case arose from a dispute regarding where housing for low-income persons should be constructed in Dallas, Texas—that is, whether low-income housing projects that received government tax credits should be built in the...more

Supreme Court Update: Texas Department Of Housing And Community Affairs V. The Inclusive Communities Project (13-1371) And Johnson...

A few hours ago, the gavel banged a close to October Term 2014, after the release of the final three decisions of the term—Glossip v. Gross (14-7955), holding that the use of a particular drug in a three-drug execution...more

U.S. Supreme Court Decides Fair Housing Act Allows Disparate-Impact Claims

On June 25th, the U.S. Supreme Court issued its opinion in Texas Department of Housing and Community Affairs, et al. v. Inclusive Communities Project, Inc., et al., holding that disparate-impact claims are cognizable under...more

Supreme Court Upholds Disparate Impact: What are the Practical Consequences for Mortgage Lenders?

The Supreme Court has held that disparate impact claims are valid under the federal Fair Housing Act (the “FHA”). In essence, this means that liability under the FHA can be proven by showing discriminatory effects of...more

Fair Housing Disparate Impact Claims Survive SCOTUS Challenge

The U.S. Supreme Court has decided, 5 - 4, that the Fair Housing Act (FHA) permits the use of a major antidiscrimination tool, the legal theory of disparate impact. Texas Department of Housing and Community Affairs v. The...more

Housing Discrimination Claims Given Boost By Supreme Court

Today, by a 5-4 vote, the U.S. Supreme Court held that the federal Fair Housing Act (FHA) encompasses claims of disparate-impact discrimination. This decision, which marks the first time that the Supreme Court addressed this...more

Fair Housing Act Prohibits Policies and Practices Causing a Disparate Impact - Housing Policies and Practices Must Be "Necessary...

On June 25, 2015, the U.S. Supreme Court held that individuals and groups can challenge housing policies or practices that have a disproportionate adverse effect on protected classes (i.e., a disparate impact) – even if there...more

The U.S. Supreme Court decides 5-4: disparate-impact liability is cognizable under the Fair Housing Act

In a 5-4 decision today, the U.S. Supreme Court recognized that disparate-impact claims maintain adjudication viability under the Fair Housing Act (FHA). Justices Kennedy, Ginsberg, Breyer, Sotomayor, and Kagan provided the...more

BREAKING NEWS: U.S. Supreme Court rules disparate impact claims are cognizable under the FHA

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled this morning that disparate impact claims are cognizable under the Fair Housing Act. Justice Kennedy wrote the majority opinion in Texas Department of Housing and Community Affairs v. The...more

Supreme Court upholds ‘disparate impact’ under the FHA but emphasizes that claims cannot rely on statistics alone

In a much-anticipated decision, the U.S. Supreme Court held in Texas Department of Housing and Community Affairs v. Inclusive Communities Project (“Inclusive Communities”) that claims of disparate impact discrimination are...more

Supreme Court Decides Texas Department of Housing & Community Affairs v. The Inclusive Communities Project, Inc.

On June 25, 2015, the U.S. Supreme Court decided Texas Department of Housing & Community Affairs v. The Inclusive Communities Project, Inc., No. 13-1371, holding that a disparate-impact claim is cognizable under the Fair...more

Supreme Court Upholds Use of Disparate Impact in FHA Claims

In a decision certain to have major repercussions for the banking industry, the Supreme Court on Thursday upheld the use of disparate impact theories of liability – that is, suits that claim a law or practice has a...more

US Supreme Court Upholds Use of Disparate Impact Claims in Fair Lending Enforcement

The US Supreme Court finally weighed in today on whether the disparate impact theory may be used to prove housing discrimination and ruled that such claims are viable under the Fair Housing Act (FHA), 42 U.S.C. §§ 3601 et...more

In 5-4 Decision, U.S. Supreme Court Recognizes Disparate Impact Liability Under the Fair Housing Act

The U.S. Supreme Court held today that disparate impact claims are cognizable under the Fair Housing Act (FHA), in a 5-4 opinion authored by Justice Kennedy. He was joined by Justices Ginsburg, Breyer, Sotomayor, and Kagan....more

Supreme Court’s Alabama Ruling Sets The Stage For Arizona’s Next Redistricting Battle

The U.S. Supreme Court last week reversed a federal three-judge panel in Alabama that upheld the state’s legislative district map against a racial gerrymandering challenge. Alabama Legislative Black Caucus v. Alabama...more

Supreme Court Decides Alabama Legislative Black Caucus v. Alabama

On March 25, 2015, the U.S. Supreme Court decided Alabama Legislative Black Caucus v. Alabama, No. 13-895, holding that: 1) racial gerrymandering claims must be viewed on a district-by-district basis, rather than on a...more

"Supreme Court May Nix Disparate Impact in Fair Lending Enforcement"

In recent years, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) and Department of Justice (DOJ) have increased fair lending enforcement under the disparate impact theory of liability. This term, however, the U.S. Supreme...more

Third Time Is the Charm: U.S. Supreme Court Hears Argument in Disparate Impact Case

The U.S. Supreme Court recently heard oral argument in Texas Department of Housing and Community Affairs v. The Inclusive Communities Project, Inc.—the case presenting the issue of whether disparate impact claims are...more

High Court Decision In Michigan Affirmative Action Case Leaves Requirements For The Consideration Of Race Untouched

The U.S. Supreme Court held yesterday that a voter-approved ban on the use of race-based preferences for public university admissions does not violate the U.S. Constitution. The decision focused narrowly on whether the U.S....more

Supreme Court Ruling Exposes Continuing Division on Use of Race in Higher Education Admissions

Yesterday's ruling in Schuette v. Coalition to Defend Affirmative Action shows that the justices on the U.S. Supreme Court remain fundamentally divided about the future of race-conscious admission policies in higher...more

Mount Holly case draws numerous amicus briefs supporting Township’s position

Thirteen amicus briefs have been filed in Township of Mount Holly v. Mt. Holly Gardens Citizens in Action, Inc., the case pending in the U.S. Supreme Court in which the question presented is whether disparate impact claims...more

Labor Letter, September 2013: Employers Go "Two For Two" – Three Times Over: A Review Of The 2012-13 Supreme Court Term

Looking back at the recently-completed 2012-2013 Supreme Court term, employers should have reason to feel good about how things turned out. In fact, of the six major decisions that impact employers and can be categorized in...more

Labor Letter, September 2013: Supreme Court Tightens Standard In Retaliation Cases

As the U.S. Supreme Court ended its most recent term with a number of cases that will have broad societal implications, one employment law case decided by the Court seems to have taken somewhat of a back seat, despite the...more

International Employment Law Review: August 2013 - Issue 4: Recent Employment Law Developments in the United States

U.S. Supreme Court Decisions - Court Limits Definition of “Supervisor” Under Federal Anti-Discrimination Law - In Vance v. Ball State University (June 24, 2013), in a 5-4 decision, a majority of the Supreme...more

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