Reasonable Accommodation Pregnancy

News & Analysis as of

Supreme Court Creates New Framework for Deciding Pregnancy Discrimination Claims

What you need to know: The US Supreme Court recently decided a case where it created a new framework for proving pregnancy-related discrimination, making it easier for cases to reach a jury....more

New Illinois Laws in 2015: What Employers Should Know

Ban the Box - Joining the current “Ban the Box” trend, effective January 1, 2015, the Job Opportunities for Qualified Applicants Act prohibits Illinois employers from asking job applicants about their criminal record...more

Employers Beware: New Standard Issued for Accommodating Pregnancy

Earlier this week, the U.S. Supreme Court declared that a new test applies for pregnancy discrimination. In Young v. UPS, the Supremes decided that in pregnancy discrimination actions under the federal Pregnancy...more

U.S. Supreme Court Announces New Standard for Pregnancy Discrimination Claims

Last Wednesday the U.S. Supreme Court issued its much-anticipated decision in Young v. United Parcel Service, Inc. (UPS), which involves a claim of pregnancy discrimination under the Pregnancy Discrimination Act (PDA)....more

Supreme Court Vacates 4th Circuit in UPS Pregnancy Discrimination Case, But Rejects EEOC's "Most Favored Employee" Argument

Since the case was argued on December 3, 2014, practitioners and clients alike have been anxiously awaiting the Supreme Court's decision in Young v. United Parcel Service, Inc. That wait is over as the Supreme Court issued a...more

U.S. Supreme Court Rules on Pregnancy Accommodations

This is one of our "ones to watch for 2015" – Young v. UPS. The legal question certified by the Supreme Court in 2014 was: Whether, and in what circumstances, the Pregnancy Discrimination Act requires an employer that...more

U.S. Supreme Court Vacates Young v. UPS Finding that UPS Failed to Accommodate Lifting Restrictions of Pregnant Worker

The U.S. Supreme Court revived Peggy Young’s pregnancy discrimination claim against UPS by vacating a Fourth Circuit decision today by a 6-3 vote. Young worked as an air driver for UPS, which required her to lift up to 70...more

2015 Check-In — Have you updated your policies and documents?

Earlier this year, we posted a checklist outlining key issues and action items for compliance in 2015. With the first quarter coming to a close, we want to remind you of a few important items from that checklist that required...more

DC's Protecting Pregnant Workers Fairness Act Takes Effect

D.C. employers are now required to accommodate pregnant workers. The District of Columbia’s Protecting Pregnant Workers Fairness Act of 2014 (the Act) took effect on March 3. The new law requires D.C. employers to...more

D.C.’s New Law Protecting Pregnant Workers Is Now Effective

On March 3, 2015, the D.C. Protecting Pregnant Workers Fairness Act of 2014 became effective. The Act provides increased protections for pregnant workers and requires employers to provide reasonable workplace accommodations...more

Connecticut Law May Force Employer to Transfer Pregnant Employee

So, in yesterday’s post, I alerted you to a portion of the state’s pregnancy discrimination law that you may not have been aware of, namely Conn. Gen. Stat. Sec. 46a-60(a)(7)(E). If you haven’t read it yet, I’d suggest you...more

New Protections for Pregnant Employees Set to Take Effect in the District of Columbia

Employers in the District of Columbia will soon be required to provide reasonable workplace accommodations to employees whose ability to perform the functions of their positions are limited as a result of pregnancy,...more

Get Ready! DC’s Protecting Pregnant Workers Fairness Act Currently Expected To Take Effect On March 3, 2015

The District of Columbia recently joined twelve other states that have enacted laws requiring employers to accommodate certain limitations associated with pregnancy. The Protecting Pregnant Workers Fairness Act (the “Act” or...more

Illinois Employers Will Need To Comply With Several New Laws That Take Effect In 2015

The Job Opportunities for Qualified Applicant Act: Commonly referred to as the "ban-the-box” law, employers with 15 or more employees cannot consider or inquire into an applicant’s criminal record or history until: (a) the...more

Accommodations for Pregnant Employees Reaches Supreme Court

What accommodations must employers provide to pregnant employees? On December 3, 2014, the Supreme Court heard oral argument in a case, Young v. United Parcel Service, that may help clarify the answer to this question. The...more

Reminder - New Pregnancy Discrimination Obligations and Poster for Illinois Employers

As we previously reported, as of January 1, 2015, Illinois employers with 15 or more employees are subject to new amendments to the Illinois Human Rights Act that require employers to reasonably accommodate employees affected...more

Does the Pregnancy Discrimination Act Require Employers to Provide Light Duty Accommodations to Pregnant Employees?

Thirty-five years ago, the Pregnancy Discrimination Act (“PDA”) established that it is unlawful for employers with fifteen or more employees to discriminate against pregnant workers “because of or on the basis of pregnancy,...more

Does the Pregnancy Discrimination Act Require Light Duty Assignments for Pregnant Workers?

The Supreme Court recently heard oral argument in Young v. UPS, a case that could drastically impact accommodation policies for pregnant employees. Up until now, courts widely held that employers could offer light-duty...more

UPS Changes Pregnant Worker Policy with Case Pending in Supreme Court

According to a memo recently sent out to all UPS employees, as of January 1, 2015 the company will offer its temporary light duty positions to pregnant workers as well as workers that have suffered injuries on the job. This...more

The Supreme Court May Soon Have the Final Say on an Employer’s Duty to Accommodate Pregnancy

2014 has been a big year for pregnancy protections in employment law. In May, Minnesota enacted a new pregnancy accommodation law, and in July the federal Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) issued an updated...more

Employers in Illinois Take Note: Pregnancy Accommodation Amendments Go Into Effect January 1, 2015

As of January 1, 2015, the recently enacted pregnancy accommodation amendments to the Illinois Human Rights Act (“IHRA”) will go into effect, requiring many Illinois employers to update or change their policies and practices...more

Lessons Learned from the EEOC's Guidance on Pregnancy Discrimination

A pregnant nursing assistant for a long term care facility gives her employer a doctor’s note with a 20 pound lifting restriction for the duration of her pregnancy. The job requires her to lift in excess of 50 pounds on a...more

The Trend Continues … Pittsburgh Passes Pregnancy Accommodation Legislation

Earlier this month, the Pittsburgh City Council unanimously passed two city ordinances requiring employers to make reasonable accommodations for pregnant workers. The new legislation provides for temporary job restructuring...more

EEOC Issues New Guidance on Pregnancy

The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) recently issued comprehensive "Enforcement Guidance on Pregnancy Discrimination and Related Issues” (the Guidance). Along with the Guidance, the EEOC issued a Q&A document as...more

A Reader Asks: “Is It Me, Or Has Job Interviewing Become Really Complicated?”

Last week, I wrote about the two situations in which an employer should ask an applicant about a disability or a religious belief or practice that might require reasonable accommodation. (As I emphasized last week, 99 percent...more

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