Same-Sex Marriage Domestic Partnership

Same-sex marriage refers to marriage between two individuals of the same sex. Historically, such marriages have not been legally recognized. However, there has been a growing trend to expand marriage rights to... more +
Same-sex marriage refers to marriage between two individuals of the same sex. Historically, such marriages have not been legally recognized. However, there has been a growing trend to expand marriage rights to same-sex couples. The United States Supreme Court addressed aspects of this issue in Windsor v. United States and Hollingsworth v. Perry.  less -
News & Analysis as of

Washington State Same-Sex Registered Domestic Partnerships Automatically Convert to Lawful Marriages on June 30, 2014

On June 30, 2014, same-sex domestic partnerships registered with the Washington Secretary of State will automatically convert to lawful marriages, unless one of the partners is age 62 or older, or the domestic partners have...more

Equal Tax Treatment for Same-Sex Couples in the Wake of Recent Supreme Court Ruling and IRS Guidance

Same-sex marriages now are being recognized under federal tax law for the first time. In June 2013, the Supreme Court released its decision in United States v. Windsor, 530 U.S. 12 (2013), declaring Section 3 of the federal...more

New IRS Guidance on Same-Sex Spouses and Cafeteria Plans

Action by December 31st Required for Safe Harbor - Yesterday, the IRS issued specific guidance on how employers can address issues arising from the change in tax treatment for same-sex spouses under cafeteria plans. ...more

New California Law Affects State Taxation of Employer Tax Gross-Ups for Domestic Partners

The California state legislature recently enacted a law that may affect the taxation of benefits an employer provides to same-sex domestic partners in the state. California AB 362 excludes from gross income for California...more

IRS Guidance On Same-Sex Marriage: Employee Benefit Considerations

In response to the Supreme Court decision in United States v. Windsor, 133 S. Ct. 2675 (2013), the Internal Revenue Service issued Revenue Ruling 2013-17 (Ruling) on August 29, 2013, in which the IRS set forth the following...more

Revenue Ruling Confirms that IRS Will Recognize Same-Sex Marriages, But Not Civil Unions or Registered Domestic Partnerships

The recent U.S. Supreme Court decision inUnited States v. Windsor overturning Section 3 of the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) raised several questions regarding the federal tax treatment of same-sex couples. (See Holland &...more

The Supreme Court Said We're Married … Now What?

We recently sent an E-Alert on what the recent Supreme Court same-sex marriage decisions mean for employers, but what do those decisions mean for the couples themselves in terms of employer and tax benefits?...more

United States State Department Announces Visas for Same-Sex Spouses Are Now Available

On June 26, 2013, the Supreme Court found Section 3 of the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) unconstitutional, and we reported in our client alert of July 12, 2013 on implementation of the decision by United States Citizenship...more

U.S. v. Windsor

Last month, the Supreme Court declared unconstitutional the Defense of Marriage Act's requirement that only opposite-sex marriages may be recognized for federal law purposes. The Court's decision became effective July 21,...more

The Supreme Court’s DOMA Decision: What Does it Mean for Employee Benefit Plans?

On June 26, 2013, in U.S. v. Windsor, the United States Supreme Court struck down the portion of the Defense of Marriage Act (“DOMA”) that defined marriage as a legal union between one man and one woman. This decision will...more

Q&A on Employee Benefits After the Supreme Court’s Ruling that DOMA is Unconstitutional

The US Supreme Court has ruled that Section 3 of the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA), which defined marriage for federal law purposes to mean opposite-sex marriage, is unconstitutional (United States v. Windsor, 2013 WL...more

Ramifications of the Overturning of DOMA on Employee Benefit Plans

On June 26, 2013, the United States Supreme Court overturned Section 3 of the Defense of Marriage Act (“DOMA”), which required the federal government to deny married same-sex couples the rights and benefits provided to...more

Same-Sex Marriages and Employee Leave Entitlement After Windsor

In Windsor v. United States, No. 12-307 (June 26, 2013), the Supreme Court ruled that the section of the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) that required federal laws to ignore same-sex marriages that are legally entered into...more

DOMA And Immigration: Practical Implications Of The Supreme Court’s Decision

On June 26, 2013, the Supreme Court of the United States issued its decision in United States v. Windsor. ...more

Federal Tax Benefits Expanded to Certain Same-Sex Couples by U.S. Supreme Court

With the U.S. Supreme Court’s landmark ruling in United States v. Windsor on June 26, 2013, same–sex couples legally married in a state that recognizes same-sex marriage, and who reside in such a state, are now governed by...more

The DOMA Decision – Employee Benefit Plans Bracing for Impact

On June 26, 2013, the United States Supreme Court issued a landmark decision regarding same-sex marriage. While welcomed by proponents of marriage equality for same-sex couples, the decision left many unanswered questions...more

The Supreme Court's Decision Declaring Section 3 Of The Defense Of Marriage Act Unconstitutional Has Far-Reaching Implications For...

On June 26, 2013, in United States v. Windsor, the United States Supreme Court struck down Section 3 of DOMA, holding that it was unconstitutional to discriminate between same-sex and opposite-sex marriages for purposes of...more

Supreme Court’s Message From DOMA Ruling: Get Married!

In the wake of the Supreme Court’s recent decision in United States v. Windsor, you may have been wondering, what are all those “federal benefits now afforded to same-sex couples” that I keep hearing about? Well, one huge...more

What the Supreme Court's Defense Of Marriage Act Ruling Means For Employers

On June 26, 2013, the U.S. Supreme Court struck down Section 3 of the Defense of Marriage Act ("DOMA"), which barred federal recognition of same-sex marriages. ...more

The End of DOMA: Federal Tax and Benefits Implications

The US Supreme Court’s recent ruling in United States v. Windsor (“Windsor”) struck down key portions of the federal Defense of Marriage Act (“DOMA”) as unconstitutional. This decision will allow many same-sex spouses to...more

Defense of Marriage Act Struck Down – What it Means for Employers

The Supreme Court’s decision to strike down section 3 of the Defense of Marriage Act will have a major impact on the benefits employers provide to employees. Pending IRS guidance, employers should review benefit plans and...more

Supreme Court DOMA Decision Is Far-Reaching, but Leaves Many Unanswered Questions for Employers

On June 26, 2013, the United States Supreme Court held in United States v. Windsor, that Section 3 of the Defense of Marriage Act (“DOMA”) was “unconstitutional as a deprivation of the equal liberty of persons that is...more

Same-Sex Marriages and Benefit Plans After Windsor

On June 26, 2013, the Supreme Court issued its long-awaited decision in Windsor v. United States, No. 12-307. The Court ruled (in a 5-4 decision) that the section of the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) that required federal...more

Supreme Court Ruling on Same-Sex Marriage: Impact on Employee Benefits

The United States Supreme Court’s landmark decision on June 26, 2013 in United States v. Windsor that struck down Section 3 of the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) as unconstitutional has far reaching implications for employee...more

United States v. Windsor: A New Direction in Planning for Same-Sex Couples

On June 26, 2013, the U.S. Supreme Court in United States v. Windsor1 overturned Section 3 of the Defense of Marriage Act ("DOMA"), which had defined marriage as a union between a man and a woman.2 As a result, married...more

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