Supreme Court of the United States Securities Fraud

The United States Supreme Court is the highest court of the United States and is charged with interpreting federal law, including the United States Constitution. The Court's docket is largely discretionary... more +
The United States Supreme Court is the highest court of the United States and is charged with interpreting federal law, including the United States Constitution. The Court's docket is largely discretionary with only a limited number of cases granted review each term.  The Court is comprised of one chief justice and eight associate justices, who are nominated by the President and confirmed by the Senate to hold lifetime positions. less -
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You Were Wrong, But Did You Know You Were Wrong? The Supreme Court To Resolve The Circuit Split On The Pleading Standard For...

Can a securities plaintiff satisfy Section 11 of the Securities Act simply by alleging that a statement of opinion was objectively false, or must the plaintiff also allege that the speaker subjectively knew the statement was...more

The Supreme Court Ponders The Future Of The Basic Presumption In Securities Litigation

The Supreme Court recently heard oral argument in Halliburton Co. v. Erika P. John Fund, Inc. in advance of what could be the most important decision affecting securities litigation in recent history. The outcome of the...more

Halliburton Oral Argument: The Fraud-On-The-Market Theory Is “Basic”Ally A Sore Thumb

On March 5, the Supreme Court heard oral arguments in Halliburton v. The Erica P. John Fund. As discussed in previous blog posts, the United States Supreme Court agreed to consider Petitioner Halliburton’s argument to modify...more

Supreme Court Hears Argument in Potentially Game-Changing Securities Law Case

On March 5, 2014, the U.S. Supreme Court heard argument in Halliburton v. Erica P. John Fund. The outcome of this case may change the landscape for securities class actions. The issue in Halliburton is whether the fraud on...more

Supreme Court Maintains Viability of State Law Claims Related to Securities Transactions

A recent Supreme Court opinion, Chadbourne & Parke LLP v. Troice, addresses the viability of class action state-law claims arising from fraudulent securities transactions. This was an opportunity for the Court to limit...more

Supreme Court Rules that the Securities Litigation Uniform Standards Act Does Not Preempt State Law Claims

This week, the US Supreme Court narrowed the scope of the preemption provisions of the Securities Litigation Uniform Standards Act (SLUSA), which bars certain state law-based securities class actions. As a result, securities...more

Complex Litigation Update: SCOTUS Allows Plaintiffs’ State-Law Class Actions Against Law Firms, Financial Firms, and Others to...

On Wednesday of last week, the Supreme Court of the United States issued a 7-2 decision affirming a Fifth Circuit ruling permitting four state-law class actions to proceed against two New York law firms and others in a matter...more

U.S. Supreme Court Ruling Opens the Door to More State-Law Securities Class Actions

Today, in a 7-2 decision with Justice Breyer writing for the majority, the Supreme Court issued a narrow interpretation of when the federal Securities Litigation Uniform Standards Act (“SLUSA”) preempts state-law securities...more

"Inside the Courts: Supreme Court Decides Scope of ‘In Connection With’ Requirement of the Securities Litigation Uniform Standards...

Today, in a 7-2 decision, the United States Supreme Court appeared to narrow the scope of the “in connection with the purchase or sale of a covered security” as used in SLUSA. Justice Breyer delivered the opinion of the Court...more

California Lawyer 2014 Roundtable Series: Securities

Executive Summary - In private securities litigation, all eyes are on the U.S. Supreme Court hearing set for March on Halliburton Co.’s appeal challenging the longstanding fraud on-the-market doctrine, which underlies...more

U.S. Supreme Court to Reconsider "Fraud-on-the-Market" Presumption in Securities Fraud Class Actions

On November 15, 2013, the U.S. Supreme Court announced that it would revisit the "fraud-on-the-market" presumption that it adopted 25 years ago, which substantially expanded securities fraud class actions. The appeal in which...more

Will Securities Fraud Class Actions Fade Into History?

The U.S. Supreme Court’s grant of certiorari in Halliburton Co. v. Erica P. John Fund, No. 13-317, suggests a dramatic change in private securities litigation is possible. On November 15, 2013, the Court accepted...more

Inside The Courts - December 2013 | Volume 5 | Issue 4

In This Issue: *U.S. SUPREME COURT: - Halliburton Co. v. Erica P. John Fund, Inc., No. 13-317 (U.S. Nov. 15, 2013) Lawson v. FMR LLC, No. 12-3 (U.S. Nov. 12, 2013) - Chadbourne & Parke LLP v. Troice, No....more

Supreme Court to Revisit the Plaintiff-Friendly “Fraud-on-the-Market” Presumption in Securities Fraud Class Actions

The U.S. Supreme Court is set to decide a case this term that could significantly affect the viability of securities fraud class actions against public companies. The case, Halliburton Co. v. Erica P. John Fund, Inc., will...more

Is the United States Supreme Court Poised to Overrule or Modify Basic Inc. v. Levinson?

On November 15, 2013, the U.S. Supreme Court granted a petition for writ of certiorari to Petitioner Halliburton Company (“Halliburton”) in the case entitled Halliburton Co. v. Erica P. John Fund, Inc., f/k/a Archdiocese of...more

Not So Basic Supreme Court to Revisit the Fraud-­on-­the Market Presumption of Reliance

Parties to pending securities fraud class actions may adjust litigation strategies, even before the Court revisits Basic’s presumption of investor reliance. On Friday, November 15, 2013, the Supreme Court granted...more

Basic Is Anything But: Courts Continue to Wrangle with the Fraud-on-the-Market Presumption

It has been 25 years since the Supreme Court announced the fraud-on-the-market presumption of reliance in Basic Inc. v. Levinson, 485 U.S. 224 (1988). Yet many courts, including the Supreme Court itself, continue to struggle...more

Legal Alert: In a Class of Their Own: the Impact of the Supreme Court's October 2012 Term on Class Actions

During its recently concluded October 2012 term, the Supreme Court of the United States decided seven cases that are likely to have a significant impact on class action practice. This term’s decisions addressed evidentiary...more

Bernstein Shur Business and Commercial Litigation Newsletter #29

We are pleased to present the 29th edition of the Bernstein Shur Business and Commercial Litigation Newsletter. This month, we highlight a Supreme Court decision addressing the waiver of class action rights, the SEC’s new...more

June 2013: Securities Litigation Update - Supreme Court Rejects the Need to Prove “Materiality” for Class Certification in...

Resolving a split among several circuits, the U.S. Supreme Court in Amgen Inc. v. Connecticut Retirement Plans & Trust Funds, 133 S.Ct. 1184 (2013), held that plaintiffs are not required to demonstrate that misrepresentations...more

Bernstein Shur Business and Commercial Litigation Newsletter #28

We are pleased to present the 28th edition of the Bernstein Shur Business and Commercial Litigation Newsletter. This month, we highlight cases that address cloud-computing contacts as the basis for jurisdiction, clarification...more

Second Take on Amgen: Defense Arguments Largely Intact, Even in Overruled Circuits

In our post in the immediate wake of the Supreme Court’s decision in Amgen Inc. v. Connecticut Retirement Plans, we concluded that rather than being a new threat to the defense of securities class actions, Amgen basically...more

Gabelli v. SEC: The Supreme Court Limits the Statute of Limitations for SEC Actions

In a recent unanimous decision, the U.S. Supreme Court held that the Securities Exchange Commission (SEC) has five years from the date when an alleged fraud begins – not from the date when the SEC uncovers the fraud – to...more

Supreme Court's Decision Reshapes Class Certification for Future Securities Class Actions

On February 27, 2013, the U.S. Supreme Court addressed a long-standing circuit split on the issue of whether, when bringing a securities fraud class action under Section 10(b) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, a...more

Supreme Court Denies SEC Extra Time to Bring Enforcement Actions for Civil Penalties

The US Supreme Court recently held that the Securities and Exchange Commission has five years from the date an alleged fraud occurs, not from the date of its discovery, to bring an enforcement action for civil penalties....more

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