Statute of Limitations The United States Department of Labor

Statute of Limitations refers to a statute that sets the time period during which a legal claim can be brought. Most statute of limitations laws require individuals to sue at some point during a set period... more +
Statute of Limitations refers to a statute that sets the time period during which a legal claim can be brought. Most statute of limitations laws require individuals to sue at some point during a set period usually commencing from the date of the wrong or injury or the discovery of the wrong or injury. Except for under a limited set of circumstances, if an individual does not file a suit within the specified time period, the law bars them from ever suing on that claim. less -
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The SEC Whistleblower Program

On Oct. 1, 2013, the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) announced that it had awarded more than $14 million to an unidentified whistleblower who provided information leading to a successful enforcement action — by far...more

The ERISA Litigation Newsletter - February 2014

The employee benefits issues to be considered by the U.S. Supreme Court continue to be of great significance to plan sponsors and fiduciaries. This month we review the Court's employee benefit decisions from 2013 and also...more

ARB Says Equitable Modification of SOX Statute of Limitations Saves Untimely Complaint

On March 29, 2013, the Department of Labor’s Administrative Review Board (“ARB”) ruled that a “standstill” agreement between an employer and employee that required both parties to provide notice before initiating legal...more

ARB Says “Convenience Leave” Letter Does Not Trigger SOX Statute of Limitations

On August 31, 2012, the Administrative Review Board (ARB) of the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) liberally interpreted the standard governing when the SOX statute of limitations clock starts ticking, ruling that a letter...more

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