United States Patent and Trademark Office DNA

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office is an agency of the United States Department of Commerce that serves a fundamental role in the U.S. intellectual property system by issuing patents and registering trademarks.... more +
The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office is an agency of the United States Department of Commerce that serves a fundamental role in the U.S. intellectual property system by issuing patents and registering trademarks.    less -
News & Analysis as of

An Early Test for the USPTO’S Eligibility Analysis

Just last week, the USPTO released its revised subject matter eligibility guidance (2014 Interim Guidance on Patent Subject Matter Eligibility “Interim Guidance” reviewed in my prior post of December 16th, 2014). The Interim...more

Intellectual Property and Technology News - December 2014 (Global)

In This Issue: - Fundamental Reform Ahead For European Patent Law - Patentability of Isolated Nucleic Acid - Patent Reform – Is It Working? - Right To Privacy In Japan - Supreme Court Corner - The FTC...more

USPTO Issues New Guidance with Fewer Limitations on the Subject Matter Eligibility of Patent Claims

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) today released its latest iteration of guidance—referred to as the "Interim Eligibility Guidance"—to its examiners. This guidance is aimed at assessing whether an invention claimed...more

Yamanaka iPSC Patent Challenged

Dr. Shinya Yamanaka of Kyoto University shared the 2012 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine with Dr. John B. Gurdon for their respective discoveries that mature, specialized cells can be reprogrammed to become immature...more

How to Protect a Product of Nature

"The more things change . . ." is the beginning of an old saw, and that saying has particular relevance just days after the USPTO stopped accepted comments on its Subject Matter Eligibility Guidance. After all, this isn't...more

USPTO Issues Guidance on Patentability of “Nature”-Related Patent Claims

The U.S. Supreme Court has recently taken a keen interest in whether certain subject matter is eligible to be patented under U.S. law1. In June 2013, the Supreme Court held in Myriad2 that patents on naturally-occurring DNA...more

Dolly Was a "Natural Phenomenon"

In re Roslin Institute (Edinburgh) - Addressing patent eligible subject matter under 35 U.S.C. § 101, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit affirmed the decision of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office...more

Docs @ BIO: USPTO Provides Update on Myriad-Mayo Guidance

At last week's BIO International Convention in San Diego, Andrew Hirshfeld, USPTO Deputy Commissioner for Patent Examination Policy, and June Cohan, a Legal Advisor with the USPTO's Office of Patent Legal Administration, took...more

Myriad - One Year Later

The Supreme Court decision last year on June 13, 2013 in Association of Molecular Pathology v. Myriad Genetics may have been a watershed moment for the biotechnology industry. So far the effects have been hard to detect, but...more

Federal Circuit Dismisses WARF Stem Cell Case – A Missed Opportunity

Recently in Consumer Watchdog v. Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation, No. 2013-1377 (Fed. Cir. 2014), the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit (Federal Circuit) dismissed Appellant Consumer Watchdog’s appeal on the...more

Guest Post: Myriad -- An Obvious and Patent-Friendly Interpretation

MyriadIs Myriad truly authority for the proposition that naturally occurring nucleic acid sequences and a host of other naturally occurring materials are no longer patent-eligible? Was it really the intention of the Supreme...more

Is Dolly the Sheep Dead Again?

The exceptions to patent eligibility under 35 USC 101 always fell into three distinct categories: laws of nature, abstract ideas, and natural phenomena. In deciding a case about whether claims of farm animals may be...more

“Natural” Clones Are Ineligible for Patent Protection

Last week, in In re Roslin Institute (Edinburgh), the Federal Circuit affirmed the rejection by the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) of product claims covering cloned mammals. This case relates to Dolly,...more

All We Like Sheep Have Gone Astray

The CAFC extends Myriad beyond DNA claims - Much ink has recently been spilled arguing that the PTO’s new guidelines go further than they should, and that Myriad’s reasoning should not be applied to proteins, cells,...more

Clones Not Patent-Eligible?

Thanks to recent advances in cloning technology, treating degenerative diseases with replacement tissue that matches a patient’s genetic makeup exactly is no longer science fiction. Just last month, for example, two research...more

Do the USPTO 101 Guidelines Violate International Trade Agreements?

One advantage of being a blogger in the relatively small world of patents is that I have gotten to know practitioners in other countries who also have a keen interest in patent law. One such person is Australian Registered...more

USPTO to Apply Myriad Beyond Isolated DNA

Today, the United States Patent and Trademark Office (“USPTO”) issued a Guidance, advising examiners and the public of the factors for determining whether an invention satisfies the U.S. Supreme Court’s interpretation of 35...more

The Fraud-Tainted Cloning Patent: Scandalous in Theory, a Storm in a Teacup in Reality

You may have heard that the United States Patent Office (USPTO) has recently issued a patent on cloning human stem cells to Korean researcher Hwang Woo-Suk. About a decade ago, Dr. Hwang claimed to have cloned the world’s...more

Institut Pasteur Obtains Reversal of USPTO Board Decision of Obviousness of Eukaryotic Site-Directed Mutagenesis Methods

In Institut Pasteur v. Focarino, the Federal Circuit found that the obviousness determination by the USPTO Board of Patent Appeals and Interferences was not supported by substantial evidence, and rested on an “erroneous...more

Federal Circuit Holds Full Sequence Not Required for Invention of DNA

In Sanofi-Aventis v. Pfizer, Inc., the Federal Circuit affirmed the USPTO’s determination that Pfizer had proven an earlier date of invention of the DNA sequence at issue, even though it did not have the full, correct...more

Burden of Section 101 following Myriad

The Supreme Court’s decision in Association for Molecular Pathology v. Myriad Genetics Inc., 2013 DJDAR 7484 (2013), held that Myriad’s claims directed to “a naturally occurring DNA segment is a product of nature and not...more

Ambry Responds to Myriad Lawsuit

Asserts Affirmative Defenses and Antitrust Counterclaims and Asks for Declaratory Judgment - On Monday Ambry filed its Answer to Myriad's complaint for patent infringement, and asserted patent misuse as an affirmative...more

Gene patents and the future of commercialized technology

Medicine is evolving from a global, one-size-fits-all approach to a more individualized approach that tailors treatment specifically for each patient. Originally published in The Journal Record - August 8, 2013....more

The Real Impact for Healthcare and Biotechnology of the Supreme Court's Decision in Myriad Genetics

On June 13, 2013, the Supreme Court issued a decision supposedly resolving the patentability of DNA in Association for Molecular Pathology v. Myriad Genetics. Immediately, all parties on both sides of the case declared...more

Senator Leahy Urges NIH to Use March-In Rights on Myriad BRCA Test

On Friday, Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-VT) sent a letter to Dr. Francis Collins, the Director of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), "to urge [the Director] to consider using march-in rights under the Bayh-Dole Act to ensure...more

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