Wrongful Termination Protected Concerted Activity

News & Analysis as of

Before You Fire: 20 Questions Every Employer Should Ask

Here are 20 questions that every employer should ask itself before going ahead with a termination. If you think I’ve missed anything, please feel free to add your own in the comments....more

Filing of Police Report Accusing Coworker of Stealing Deemed Protected Activity by California Court

It is generally understood that an employer may not retaliate against an employee for “whistleblowing” and alerting authorities that a business has engaged in unlawful activity. Is an employee also protected against...more

Facebook ‘like’ considered protected activity

Employers know that when it comes to employees discussing employment issues on social media, it is best for employers to tread carefully. A recent federal court of appeals decision confirmed that even a simple Facebook “like”...more

Court “Likes” NLRB’s determination that Facebook posts are protected under the NLRA

The Second Circuit Court of Appeals recently upheld the National Labor Relations Board’s (NLRB) decision that employees’ Facebook posts are protected by the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA). Three D, LLC d/b/a Triple Play...more

Second Circuit Says Facebook Profanity Directed at Employer is Protected - Employer Violated NLRA by Terminating Two Employees...

In Three D, LLC d/b/a/ Triple Play Sports Bar and Grille v. NLRB, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit upheld the National Labor Relations Board's (the Board) determination that the employer, Triple Play,...more

Dislike Employees’ Facebook “Likes”? Fire Away at Your Own Risk

On October 21, 2015, the Second Circuit Court of Appeals upheld the ruling of the National Labor Relations Board (“Board”) decision in Triple Play Sports Bar and Grill, 361 NLRB No. 31 (2014). The employer, Triple Play, had...more

Second Circuit Finds Facebook “Likes” Protected Under NLRA

On October 21, 2015, the Second Circuit clarified in Triple Play Sports Bar and Grille v. National Labor Relations Board that protections provided under Section 7 of the National Labor Relations Act (“NLRA”) encompass...more

NLRB Protects a New Kind of Employee Activity: Worrying About Your Job

The National Labor Relations Board (“NLRB”) has been on a roll in recent years, protecting such employee activity as complaining on Facebook or even hitting the “Like” button. In the case of Sabo, Inc.¸ the NLRB recently...more

NLRB Says Employer Cannot Rescind Contract for Employee Who Wrote Complaining Email to Co-Workers

As previously reported in EmployNews, recent National Labor Relations Board decisions have disrupted established guidelines with regard to employers’ obligations to tolerate uncivil and insulting behavior and comments from...more

NLRB Continues to Expand Employee Protections Under Federal Labor Law

In Sabo, Inc. the National Labor Relations Board (Board) found that the employer, a vending machine company, violated the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) when it fired an employee who had expressed concerns about job...more

NLRB determines vulgar Facebook posts protected concerted activity

The National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) determined that Pier Sixty LLC, a New York catering service, violated federal labor law by firing an employee server after he posted a Facebook message protesting supervisory abuse...more

Not following instructions will still get you fired, even when you engage in protected activity

In Meyers v. Eastern Oklahoma County Technology Center, the Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals upheld judgment for the employer even though the plaintiff had engaged in legally protected activity because she disregarded her...more

NLRB Says Individual Gripes About Wages are "Inherently Concerted" Activity

Many employers consider it appropriate to discourage employees from discussing compensation with their coworkers. Particularly in non-unionized environments, employers may not think twice before disciplining employees for...more

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