Main Street Lending Program Assistance During COVID-19: Can Your Business Benefit? (UPDATED)

Morgan Lewis

(Updated June 30, 2020)

The US federal government has taken significant actions to quell the economic fallout for businesses weathering the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, including the Federal Reserve providing $600 billion through the Main Street Lending Program, intended to support US companies that were in sound financial condition before the COVID-19 crisis.

The Main Street Lending Program (MSLP) presents a unique opportunity for small and medium-sized businesses—15,000 or fewer employees or 2019 annual revenues of $5 billion or less—to obtain financing during COVID-19 through bank loans supported by the federal government. This LawFlash covers the salient terms and conditions of the Main Street Lending Program.

ELIGIBILITY

The MSLP offers term loans to US businesses established prior to March 13, 2020 that either (1) employ 15,000 or fewer employees or (2) had $5 billion or less in annual revenue in 2019. To be eligible, a borrower must be “a business that is created or organized in the United States or under the laws of the United States with significant operations in and a majority of its employees based in the United States.”

In order to be eligible, borrowers must not have received specific support pursuant to the Coronavirus Economic Stabilization Act of 2020 (Subtitle A of Title IV of the CARES Act) and must not participate in the Primary Market Corporate Credit Facility. However, borrowers that have taken advantage of the Paycheck Protection Program or obtained an Economic Injury Disaster Loan may borrow Main Street loans.

Eligible lenders under the MSLP include US federally insured depository institutions (including banks, savings associations, and credit unions), US branches or agencies of foreign banks, US bank holding companies, US savings and loan holding companies, US intermediate holding companies of foreign banking organizations, and US subsidiaries of any of the foregoing. Direct lenders (non-bank lenders) are not eligible lenders under the MSLP.

MAIN STREET LENDING FACILITIES

Borrowers can participate in only one of the three MSLP facilities described below:

  1. Main Street New Loan Facility (MSNLF). An eligible loan is a secured or unsecured term loan originated after April 24, 2020. Minimum term loan size is $250,000, and the maximum is the lesser of (1) $35 million or (2) an amount that, when added to the borrower’s existing outstanding and undrawn available debt, does not exceed four times the borrower’s adjusted 2019 EBITDA (as defined below). MSNLF loans may not be, at any time, contractually subordinated in terms of payment priority to any of the borrower’s other unsecured loans or debt instruments.
  2. Main Street Priority Loan Facility (MSPLF). An eligible loan is a secured or unsecured term loan originated after April 24, 2020. Minimum term loan size is $250,000, and the maximum is the lesser of (1) $50 million or (2) an amount that, when added to the borrower’s outstanding and undrawn available debt, does not exceed six times the borrower’s adjusted 2019 EBITDA. At the time of origination and at all times that the loan is outstanding, an MSPLF loan must be senior to or pari passu with, in terms of payment and lien priority, the borrower’s other loans or debt instruments (other than mortgage debt solely with respect to lien priority).
  3. Main Street Expanded Loan Facility (MSELF). An eligible loan is a secured or unsecured term loan or revolving credit facility, made by an eligible lender, that was originated on or before April 24, 2020 and with a remaining maturity of at least 18 months (taking into account any adjustments made to the maturity of the loan after April 24, 2020, including at the time of upsizing). Minimum loan size is $10 million, and the maximum is the lesser of (1) $300 million or (2) an amount that, when added to the borrower’s existing outstanding and undrawn available debt, does not exceed six times the borrower’s adjusted 2019 EBITDA. At the time of upsizing, and at all times that the upsized tranche is outstanding, the upsized tranche must be senior to or pari passu with, in terms of payment and lien priority, the borrower’s other loans or debt instruments (other than mortgage debt). If the loan underlying a Main Street upsized tranche is part of a multi-lender facility, the eligible lender must be one of the lenders holding an interest in the underlying loan at the date of upsizing. Only the eligible lender for the Main Street upsized tranche is required to meet the eligible lender criteria.

LOAN TERMS FOR ALL MSLP LOANS

  • Five-year maturity
  • Interest rate equal to LIBOR (one or three months) plus 300 basis points
  • Principal payments deferred for two years and interest payments deferred for one year (unpaid interest will be capitalized); prepayment of loan permitted without premium or penalty
  • Amortization for all three facilities: Principal amortization of 15% at the end of the third year, 15% at the end of the fourth year, and a balloon payment of 70% at maturity at the end of the fifth year

ADJUSTED EBITDA

If a borrower is the only business in its affiliated group that has sought funding through Main Street, its affiliated group’s debt and EBITDA are not relevant to determining whether such business can qualify, unless its subsidiaries are consolidated into its financial statements. However, if the borrower has an affiliate(s) that has previously borrowed or has an application pending through a Main Street facility, then the entire affiliated group’s debt and EBITDA are relevant to determining such borrower’s maximum loan size.

For MSNLF and MSPLF loans, a Main Street lender will require the borrower to adjust its 2019 EBITDA by using the methodology that such lender has previously required for EBITDA adjustments when extending credit to the borrower or, if the borrower is a new customer, similarly situated borrowers on or before April 24, 2020. “Similarly situated borrowers” are borrowers in similar industries with comparable risk and size characteristics.

For MSELF loans, a Main Street lender will require the borrower to adjust its 2019 EBITDA by using the methodology such lender required for adjusting EBITDA when originating or amending the underlying loan on or before April 24, 2020. If a Main Street lender has used multiple EBITDA adjustment methods with respect to the borrower or similarly situated borrowers (e.g., one for use within a credit agreement and one for internal risk management purposes), the lender should choose the most conservative method it has employed.

LENDER REQUIRED CERTIFICATIONS & COVENANTS

Lenders will be required to provide certain specifications and agree to a number of covenants.

A Main Street lender is expected to obtain the borrower-required certifications and covenants from each borrower at the time of origination (or upsizing, as applicable) of the Main Street loan. Lenders may rely on a borrower’s certifications and covenants, as well as any subsequent self-reporting by the borrower. Lenders will apply their own underwriting standards in evaluating the financial condition and creditworthiness of a potential borrower. A Main Street lender ultimately determines whether an eligible borrower is approved for a loan under the MSLP. As such, businesses that otherwise meet the eligible borrower requirements may not be approved for a loan or may not receive the maximum allowable amount.

BORROWER REQUIRED CERTIFICATIONS AND COVENANTS

In addition to other certifications required by applicable statutes and regulations, the following certifications and covenants will be required of the borrower, among others:

  • It will not repay the principal balance of, and interest on, any debt, unless the debt or interest payment is mandatory and due, until (a) the Main Street loan (or the upsized tranche of the Main Street loan, as applicable) is repaid in full or (b) neither the special purpose vehicle (SPV) nor a governmental assignee holds an interest in the applicable loan in any capacity. Borrowers under the MSPLF may, at the time of origination of the Main Street loan, refinance existing debt owed by the borrower to a lender that is not the Main Street lender.
  • It will not seek to cancel or reduce any of its committed lines of credit with the Main Street lender or any other lender.
  • It has a reasonable basis to believe that, as of the date of origination (or upsizing, as applicable) of the Main Street loan and after giving effect to such loan, it has the ability to meet its financial obligations for at least the next 90 days and does not expect to file for bankruptcy during that time period.
  • It will follow compensation, stock repurchase, and capital distribution restrictions that apply to direct loan programs (described below) under Section 4003(c)(3)(A)(ii) of the CARES Act, except that an S corporation or other tax pass-through entity may make distributions to the extent reasonably required to cover its owners’ tax obligations in respect of the entity’s earnings.
  • No member of Congress, head of an executive department, the US president or vice president, or family member of any of these individuals has a controlling interest in the borrower.

RETAINING EMPLOYEES

Borrowers should make “commercially reasonable efforts” to maintain payroll and retain their employees during the time the Main Street loan (or the upsized tranche of the Main Street loan, as applicable) is outstanding. Specifically, borrowers should undertake good-faith efforts to maintain payroll and retain employees, in light of their capacities, the economic environment, available resources, and the business need for labor. Borrowers that have already laid off or furloughed workers as a result of the disruptions from COVID-19 are eligible to apply for Main Street loans.

Financial Information

For Main Street loans originated after June 28, 2020, a borrower is required to provide a lender with its (a) 2019 financial records as required under section 4.A of the Borrower Certifications and Covenants and (b) most recent financial data required per Table II of Appendix C to the FAQ (which vary by Main Street facility). For Main Street loans originated on or before June 28, 2020, the only financial disclosures that a borrower is required to provide a lender are the 2019 financial records set out in clause (b) above. Lenders may require other financial information as appropriate under their underwriting practices.

RESTRICTIONS UNDER SECTION 4003(C)(3)(A)(II) OF THE CARES ACT

  • Stock buybacks of equity listed on a national securities exchange: Through the life of the loan, plus one year
    • Exception: Repurchases under a contractual obligation in effect as of March 27, 2020 are permitted
  • Dividends and capital distributions: Through the life of the loan, plus one year (the Treasury secretary may waive this limitation)
    • Exceptions: S -corporations and other tax pass-through entities may continue to make distributions to the extent reasonably required to cover their owners’ tax obligations in respect of the entity’s earnings. Preferred stock or any other equity interest in a borrower that provides for mandatory or preferential payment of dividends or other distributions shall be subject to these restrictions unless both the equity interest and the obligation to pay dividends or distributions existed as of March 27, 2020.
  • Executive bonuses: Through the life of the loan, plus one year:
    • Officers and employees who received more than $425,000 in total compensation in 2019 cannot receive more than their 2019 compensation and cannot receive severance pay of more than twice their 2019 compensation; and
    • officers and employees who received more than $3 million in total compensation in 2019 cannot receive, during any 12-consecutive-month period, more than $3 million plus 50% of their excess compensation over $3 million.

Total Compensation

Total compensation includes salary, bonuses, awards of stock, and other financial benefits provided by the borrower and its affiliates to an officer or employee of the borrower, but does not include benefits paid in connection with a termination of employment (e.g., severance pay). A borrower that is a public company, or is a consolidated subsidiary of a public company, must calculate total compensation according to the methodology set out in item 402(c) of Regulation S-K (item 402(c)) (17 CFR 229.402(c)(2)). A borrower that is not a public company may choose to calculate total compensation (1) by using item 402(c) or (2) in a manner consistent with the federal tax rules, if the borrower meets certain criteria outlined by the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston. A borrower that has chosen to use the federal tax rules may later be required to switch to using item 402(c) if (1) such borrower later becomes a public company or (2) such borrower’s officers or employees that were not Significant Deferred Compensation Recipients later become Significant Deferred Compensation Recipients (exception: a borrower that had gross revenues of less than or equal to $10,000 for its 2019 fiscal year is exempt unless it becomes a public company).

LOAN PARTICIPATIONS

The SPV will purchase a 95% participation in Main Street loans generated under each of the three facilities under the MSLP. The sale of a participation to the SPV will be structured as a “true sale” and must be completed expeditiously after the applicable loan’s origination or upsizing. You should, therefore, understand that the federal government will have a role in decisionmaking in the term of the MSLP by way of its participation arrangements with the eligible lender.

FEES

  • Transaction Fee: A lender under the MSNLF and MSPLF will pay to the SPV a transaction fee of 100 basis points of the principal amount of the Main Street loan at the time of origination. A lender under the Expanded Loan Facility will pay to the SPV a transaction fee of 75 basis points of the principal amount of the upsized tranche of the Main Street loan at the time of upsizing. The Main Street lender may require the borrower to pay this fee.
  • Loan Origination/Upsizing and Servicing Fee: A borrower under the MSNLF and MSPLF will pay the Main Street lender an origination fee of 100 basis points of the principal amount of the Main Street loan at the time of origination. A borrower under the Expanded Loan Facility will pay the Main Street lender an origination fee of 75 basis points of the principal amount of the upsized tranche of the Main Street loan. The SPV will pay a Main Street lender 25 basis points of the principal amount of its participation in the Main Street loan (or the upsized tranche of the Main Street loan, as applicable) per annum for loan servicing.
  • Consent Fees: Lenders may also charge customary consent fees if such fees are necessary to amend existing loan documentation in connection with the upsizing of a loan under the MSELF.

FACILITY TERMINATION

The SPV will purchase participation in eligible loans under the MSLP until September 30, 2020, unless the facility is extended. The Federal Reserve Bank of Boston will continue to fund the SPV.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

FAQ FOR BORROWERS

Who might borrow under this program?

Small to mid-size corporate borrowers (including, potentially, private equity portfolio companies) with 2019 adjusted EBITDA that were in sound condition prior to the COVID-19 pandemic.

If I am owned by private equity, am I eligible to borrow?

Possibly. To determine eligibility as a borrower, you need to calculate your eligibility relative to the 15,000 employees/$5 billion 2019 revenue tests, taking into account all of your affiliates, as defined under existing SBA regulations.

Who may lend under this program?

Commercial banks, savings associations, and credit unions. Direct lenders and non-bank lenders are not eligible lenders under the MSLP.

Why would you borrow under this program?

While the program has numerous covenants and certifications that may be more onerous than traditional middle-market loans, it has an attractive interest rate of LIBOR + 300, two-year principal amortization deferral, and one-year interest payment deferral.

How much leverage can I have on my business and borrow an MSLP loan?

The MSLP sets maximum loan amounts based, in part, on a borrower’s leverage multiple. A leverage multiple is a ratio that compares a company’s free cash flow to its debt load and can be used to judge the financial health of a company. Main Street Priority Loans and Main Street Expanded Loans come in at a 6.0x leverage multiple, versus 4.0x for Main Street New Loans.

What is EBITDA?

EBITDA is a commonly applied measure of the adjusted earnings of a business. In context of the MSLP, lenders may apply adjustments to EBITDA for the borrower consistent with what they have applied before for that borrower, or for other similarly situated borrowers.

Do I need to have 2019 adjusted EBITDA in order to borrow?

Yes. This program is not available for borrowers with no 2019 adjusted EBITDA.

If I do not have adjusted EBITDA for 2019, but I have assets such as accounts receivable and inventory to collateralize an “ABL” loan, am I eligible?

No. This program is not available for borrowers with no 2019 adjusted EBITDA.

Can I lay off employees and still borrow an MSLP loan?

Yes, within reason. There is a commercially reasonable efforts standard on retention of employees.

If I am a foreign company, can I borrow an MSLP loan?

No. Only US businesses may borrow under the MSLP. However, a foreign parent company’s US subsidiary may be eligible.

What does it mean to be pari passu with other debt?

MSLP loans may not be contractually subordinated to other debt. This means that, when it comes to the right to be repaid, an MSLP loan must be at least pari passu, or equal in rank, with other debt. The same is true for lien priority of the MSLP loan relative to other loans in a borrower’s capital structure.

Can I use an MSNLF or MSELF loan to pay off other debt?

No. Only the proceeds of an MSPLF loan are permitted to refinance other debt on funding, so long as the other debt is not with the eligible lender originating the MSPLF loan.

Can I use the funds from an MSLP loan for M&A?

There is no use-of-proceeds restriction on the use of MSLP funds for M&A activity. However, the retention of employees covenant, the lien and payment priority requirements, and limitations on refinancing of other debt during the MSLP loan term would make this a challenging proposition for many M&A deals.

Can I voluntarily prepay other debt during the term of the MSLP loan?

Generally, no. Borrowers are prohibited from repaying principal balance or interest on any debt until the Main Street loan is repaid in full, unless the debt or interest payment is “mandatory and due.” Borrowers may continue to pay interest or principal payments on outstanding debt on or after the payment due date, so long as the payment due date was scheduled before the date of origination of a Main Street loan. Borrowers may also refinance debt that is maturing no later than 90 days from the date of such refinancing.

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DISCLAIMER: Because of the generality of this update, the information provided herein may not be applicable in all situations and should not be acted upon without specific legal advice based on particular situations.

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