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Search & Seizure Cell Phones

Can You Find Me Now? U.S. Supreme Court Considers Cell Phone Location Tracking Data In The Digital Age In Landmark Privacy Case

by King & Spalding on

On November 29, 2017, the U.S. Supreme Court heard oral argument in United States v. Carpenter, a case that could fundamentally change the way the government collects, uses, and tracks individuals’ location information...more

Drawing the Line: Supreme Court Addresses Major Privacy Rights in Cell Phone Dispute

On Wednesday, November 29, 2017, the Supreme Court heard arguments in the appeal of Timothy Carpenter, a man convicted and sentenced to 116 years for his role in a series of armed robberies. In proving his guilt, prosecutors...more

Supreme Court Hears Oral Argument Today in Major Case Regarding Cell Phone Location Privacy

In Carpenter v. United States, federal investigators sought cellphone location data for a set of persons suspected in a series of robberies. The Fourth Amendment prevents the government from conducting unreasonable searches...more

The Carpenter Case and Other Privacy-Related News

by Revision Legal on

As we discussed in the last few weeks, privacy is repeatedly in the news. Washington lawmakers are trying again to update the Electronic Communications Privacy Act, the Stored Communications Act (the “SCA”), and the Pen...more

The “Third Party” Catch-22

by Ifrah PLLC on

As the Department of Justice has been doubling down on law enforcement overreach, the Supreme Court has just decided to hear a case that may limit the use of a common tool that law enforcement uses to infringe upon the...more

Carpenters, Carriers, and Cell-Sites (Oh My!): SCOTUS to Hear Mobile Locational Privacy Case

by Kelley Drye & Warren LLP on

On June 5, 2017, the United States Supreme Court granted cert in Carpenter v. United States, a case in the hotly contested area of mobile cellular location data privacy. The question before the Court is whether law...more

U.S. Supreme Court Will Hear Mobile Phone Privacy Case

The United States Supreme Court has just agreed to hear the case of a Detroit man who was sentenced to 116 years in prison after data from his own cellular phone was used against him at his trial for his role in a string of...more

Exigent Circumstances Under the Fourth Amendment May Extend to the Need to Interview an Arrestee in Place

In a split decision in United States v. Delva, No. 15-cr-683 (Kearse, Winter, Jacobs), the Second Circuit held that the Fourth Amendment allowed law enforcement officers to seize cell phones and a number of letters that were...more

Immigration Fact or Fiction for the U.S. Employer: CBP Searching Electronic Devices – A New Thing?

There has been heightened interest and concern regarding the potential for U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) to search laptops and smart phones at the port of entry, due to the mention of such searches in one of...more

En Banc Fourth Circuit Rules No Fourth Amendment Protection For Cell-Site Location Information

by King & Spalding on

On May 31, 2016, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit held in United States v. Graham, Nos. 12-4659 and 12-4825, in an en banc rehearing, that the government’s acquisition of historical cell-site location...more

Ontario Court Finds Cellphone Tower “Metadata” is Private

The Ontario Superior Court of Justice (Court) recently ruled in R. v. Rogers Communications that broad cellphone “tower dump” production orders are unconstitutional as unreasonable seizures under section 8 of the Charter of...more

Riley and the Third-party Doctrine

On June 25, 2014, the U.S. Supreme Court issued one groundbreaking opinion in two cases regarding cellphone searches incident to arrest. In a unanimous opinion, the court held that under the Fourth Amendment, police must...more

Will California’s “Kill Switch” Law Kill An Employer’s Ability To Protect Sensitive Company Information?

by Hirschfeld Kraemer LLP on

Will California’s “Kill Switch” Law Kill An Employer’s Ability To Protect Sensitive Company Information? In this digital age, smartphone technology has become essential and ubiquitous to business operations. But the...more

Evolving Expectations of Privacy: Klayman v. Obama

by Hinshaw & Culbertson LLP on

In a 68-page opinion, Federal District Judge Richard J. Leon of the District of Columbia ruled yesterday in Klayman v. Obama that the NSA's systematic collection of telephone metadata of millions of citizens violates the...more

Privacy Monday: October 7, 2013

Despite the government shutdown, the Supreme Court is in for the 2013-2014 session. There are a couple of privacy cases on the agenda. U.S. v. Wurie and Riley v. California - At issue: Separate appeals over...more

Context, Content And Privacy In Warrantless Searches Of Cell Phone And Cameras

by Dentons on

Context and content matters to the assessment of reasonable expectations of privacy in criminal law matters. Recently, in R. v. B. (C.), 2013 CarswellOnt 3851 (SCJ), P. Smith J. considered the constitutionality of a...more

Sixth Circuit Rules School’s Search Of Student Cellphone Violated Fourth Amendment

by Franczek Radelet P.C. on

In a recent decision, the first federal appellate court to address the rights of school officials to search student cell phones held that a student’s violation of a school rule regarding technology did not justify a general...more

Be Careful When Searching Student Cell Phones, Sixth Circuit Warns

by Miller Canfield on

With text messages, Tweets, Facebook posts and other digital communications so prevalent in student’s lives, schools have been struggling to deal with the influx of mobile devices on campus. Last week, the Sixth U.S. Circuit...more

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Cybersecurity

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