Agencies Issue Final Rule on Appraisals for Higher-Priced Mortgage Loans

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On January 18, six federal financial regulatory agencies (the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, the Federal Housing Finance Agency, the National Credit Union Administration and the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency) issued a final rule that establishes new appraisal requirements for "higher-priced mortgage loans." The rule implements amendments to the Truth in Lending Act (TILA) made by the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2010 (the Dodd-Frank Act). Under the Dodd-Frank Act, mortgage loans are higher-priced if they are secured by consumers’ homes and have interest rates above certain thresholds.

Specifically, new TILA section 129H prohibits a creditor from extending credit in the form of a higher-risk mortgage loan to any consumer without first:

  • Obtaining a written appraisal performed by a certified or licensed appraiser who conducts a physical property visit of the interior of the property.
  • Obtaining an additional appraisal from a different certified or licensed appraiser if the higher-risk mortgage finances the purchase or acquisition of a property from a seller at a higher price than the seller paid, within 180 days of the seller’s purchase or acquisition. The additional appraisal must include an analysis of the difference in sale prices, changes in market conditions, and any improvements made to the property between the date of the previous sale and the current sale.

A creditor of a “higher-risk mortgage” must also:

  • Provide the applicant, at the time of the initial mortgage application, with a statement that any appraisal prepared for the mortgage is for the sole use of the creditor, and that the applicant may choose to have a separate appraisal conducted at the applicant’s expense.
  • Provide the applicant with one copy of each appraisal conducted in accordance with TILA section 129H without charge, at least three (3) days prior to the transaction closing date.

New TILA section 129H(f) defines a “higher-risk mortgage” with reference to the annual percentage rate (APR) for the transaction. A higher-risk mortgage is a “residential mortgage loan” secured by a principal dwelling with an APR that exceeds the average prime offer rate (APOR) for a comparable transaction as of the date the interest rate is set—

  • By 1.5 or more percentage points, for a first lien residential mortgage loan with an original principal obligation amount that does not exceed the amount for the maximum limitation on the original principal obligation of a mortgage in effect for a residence of the applicable size, as of the date of the interest rate set, pursuant to the sixth sentence of section 305(a)(2) of the Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation Act (12 U.S.C. 1454);
  • By 2.5 or more percentage points, for a first lien residential mortgage loan having an original principal obligation amount that exceeds the amount for the maximum limitation on the original principal obligation of a mortgage in effect for a residence of the applicable size, as of the date of the interest rate set, pursuant to the sixth sentence of section 305(a)(2) of the Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation Act (12 U.S.C. 1454); or
  • By 3.5 or more percentage points, for a subordinate lien residential mortgage loan.

The definition of “higher-risk mortgage” expressly excludes “qualified mortgages” as defined in TILA section 129C, and “reverse mortgage loans that are qualified mortgages” as defined in TILA section 129C. 15 U.S.C. 1639c.

For higher-priced mortgage loans, the rule requires a creditor to use a licensed or certified appraiser who prepares a written appraisal report based on a physical inspection of the interior of the property. The rule also requires creditors to disclose to an applicant information about the purpose of the appraisal and provide a consumer with a free copy of any appraisal report. If the seller acquired the property for a lower price during the prior six months and the price difference exceeds certain thresholds, a creditor will have to obtain a second appraisal at no cost to the consumer. This requirement for higher-priced home-purchase mortgage loans is intended to address fraudulent property flipping by seeking to ensure that the value of the property legitimately increased.

The rule exempts several types of loans, such as qualified mortgages, temporary bridge loans and construction loans, loans for new manufactured homes, and loans for mobile homes, trailers and boats that are dwellings. The rule also has exemptions from the second appraisal requirement to facilitate loans in rural areas and other transactions. The rule is scheduled to become effective on January 18, 2014.

In response to public comments, the agencies intend to publish a supplemental proposal to request additional comment on possible exemptions for “streamlined” refinance programs and small dollar loans, as well as to seek clarification on whether the rule should apply to loans secured by existing manufactured homes and certain other property types.

Read more.

 

Topics:  CFPB, Dodd-Frank, FDIC, Federal Reserve, FHA, Higher-Priced Mortgage Loans, Mortgages, TILA

Published In: General Business Updates, Consumer Protection Updates, Finance & Banking Updates, Residential Real Estate Updates

DISCLAIMER: Because of the generality of this update, the information provided herein may not be applicable in all situations and should not be acted upon without specific legal advice based on particular situations.

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