California Lawyer 2013 Roundtable Series: False Claims

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Explore:  False Claims Act Fraud

The Federal False Claims Act — Originally Intended To Stop Fraud Against the Union Army during the Civil War — seemed destined to fade into history after 1943, when Congress limited the rewards and evidence it allowed. But Congress revived the law amid Reagan-era defense procurement scandals, and California led a parade of states adopting similar statutes. The laws let people who uncover fraud sue for recovery on the government’s behalf and retain some of the damages awarded; in California, people can sue in the interest of local governments and agencies as well as the state. The reach of the federal law broadened with the Fraud Enforcement and Recovery Act of 2009 (Pub. L. No. 111-21), and the boom in False Claims Act practice has shown no sign of letting up since. Here’s an update with Maria Ellinikos of Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld; Ryan Hassanein of Morrison & Foerster; Lexi Hazam of Lieff Cabraser Heimann & Bernstein; and Sara Winslow of the U.S. Attorney’s office, Northern District of California. The discussion was moderated by California Lawyer and reported by Cherree P. Peterson of Barkley Court Reporters.

Originally published in California Lawyer on December 2, 2013.

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Topics:  False Claims Act, Fraud

Published In: Civil Procedure Updates, Civil Remedies Updates, Government Contracting Updates, Health Updates, Labor & Employment Updates

DISCLAIMER: Because of the generality of this update, the information provided herein may not be applicable in all situations and should not be acted upon without specific legal advice based on particular situations.

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