Documentation Needed for Deferred Action

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Soon after announcing the launch of a “deferred action” program to suspend immigration enforcement actions against qualifying individuals who came to the U.S. as children, the White House and the Department of Homeland Security started to issue clarifying interpretations related to the elements needed for qualification.

These authorities have made it clear that individuals who wish to qualify for deferred action must be prepared to present documentation that will prove that they: (1) came to the U.S. before age 16; (2) have resided in the U.S. continuously for at least five years prior to and including June 15, 2012 (when the program became effective); and (3) are currently enrolled in or graduated from high school, have a GED or have honorably served in the Coast Guard or Armed Forces of the United States.

In order to prove these elements of qualification, an immigrant may make use of financial records, medical records, school records, employment records, military records, and any other public or private records that are genuine and sufficiently credible to act as reliable evidence.

Generally, when it comes to evidence, more is better, but there are exceptions, which can be explained by an experienced immigration lawyer.

There are also other elements to the qualification for deferred action, but those too can be explained by experienced counsel.

If you are an individual in need of immigration assistance, do not hesitate to contact our office for an appointment to speak with a qualified immigration lawyer at (847) 564-0712. You can also check out our immigration law Website for more information on how we might assist you in any of a variety of ways.

Topics:  Deferred Action, DHS, Undocumented Immigrants

Published In: Administrative Agency Updates, Immigration Updates

DISCLAIMER: Because of the generality of this update, the information provided herein may not be applicable in all situations and should not be acted upon without specific legal advice based on particular situations.

© Ronald Shapiro | Attorney Advertising

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