IP: Three things to know about mediating licensing disputes - Follow these tips to have the best opportunity for settlement in IP cases

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The number of IP disputes resolved in mediation has continued to increase as more attorneys make efforts to find a speedy resolution and cut litigation time and cost for their clients. Only a small percentage of costly patent infringement cases actually go to trial, and approximately 90 percent of them are settled, often by entering into a licensing agreement covering future use.

Business people and their counsel recognize that mediation is a cost-effective, low-risk process with a remarkably high success rate when conducted by an experienced mediator. In mediation, the parties avoid the risk of trial and remain in control of the resolution rather than turning it over to a third party, a judge or jury. Also, mediation is a good way to preserve business relationships, something that often is important in a licensing dispute. In order to have the best opportunity for settlement, counsel should consider the following three points...

Originally published in Inside Counsel on April 2, 2013.

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Topics:  Dispute Resolution, Infringement, Licenses, Mediation, Patents, Settlement

Published In: Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) Updates, General Business Updates, Intellectual Property Updates

DISCLAIMER: Because of the generality of this update, the information provided herein may not be applicable in all situations and should not be acted upon without specific legal advice based on particular situations.

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