NLRB Permits Use of Giant Inflatable Rats Against Employers with Whom Unions Have No Labor Dispute

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Recently, the National Labor Relations Board decided that a union’s positioning of a giant inflatable rat near the entrance of a construction project at an acute care hospital where neutral employers worked (i.e., those with whom the union has no labor dispute) does not violate the National Labor Relations Act. Sheet Metal Workers Int’l Assoc., Local 15 (Brandon Reg’l Med. Ctr.), 356 NLRB No. 162 (May 26, 2011).

In what has become a common pattern with the Board, Chairman Liebman and Members Pearce and Becker were in the majority, and Member Hayes dissented.

The National Labor Relations Act prohibits unions from inducing strikes or picketing against neutral employers (also called secondary employers) with whom the unions have no labor dispute, but it does not prevent unions from engaging in this activity against employers with whom the unions have the dispute (called primary employers). Where primary and neutral employers work side-by-side at a worksite (like a construction project), the Act prohibits unions from picketing the worksite since doing so embroils neutral employers in a labor dispute over which they have no control.

Please see full article below for more information.

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Published In: Administrative Agency Updates, Constitutional Law Updates, Labor & Employment Updates

DISCLAIMER: Because of the generality of this update, the information provided herein may not be applicable in all situations and should not be acted upon without specific legal advice based on particular situations.

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