The Four Main Advantages of Trial Lawyer against Expert Witness

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In the first part of this article series, I described the reasons that a trial attorney needs to cross-examine an expert witness.

Against the expert witness defending his home territory, the trial lawyer has four main advantages.

1) The trial lawyer can choose not to ask any questions at all, or more likely, can choose not to ask certain questions. He can avoid certain battlefields. The task of preparing to cross-examine an expert witness is largely one of determining which questions NOT to ask.

2) The trial lawyer can choose to ask only questions which require either a “yes” or a “no” answer. He can take away the expert’s most potent weapon – the monologue.

3) The trial lawyer can learn the specific narrow aspect of the expert’s subject matter that is relevant to the specific issue being tried. He can learn that part of the territory on which the battle will be fought.

4) And finally, the trial lawyer can analyze and criticize the expert’s answers in the home territory of final argument, on his own turf, where the expert is speechless.

Effective use of these four advantages minimizes the expert’s strength, his expertise in the subject matter, and maximizes the trial lawyer’s strength, the ability to question narrowly then comment on the answer without reply.

Put it in perspective, right at the start. The average expert witness knows as much about his or her field as you know about law.

“That means a lot of different things. It means, for example, that the knowledge and ability of nearly any expert is uneven. It means that the typical doctor knows no more about hepatitis, pyloric stenosis or coronary arrhythmia than the average lawyer knows about promissory estoppels, renvoi, or the doctrine of worthier title. It means that a lawyer can learn enough about the flash point of waxes to cross-examine an electrical engineer who specified wax paper condensers in a color television set designed to operate at just 5 degrees lower than the burning point of wax. It also means that the witness – unless he has had previous courtroom experience – is going to be scared.” McElhaney, Trial Notebook, page 167. *

In the remaining parts of this article series, I will discuss:

  • The three conceptual categories of potential lines of questioning;
  • Final preparation for the cross-examination;
  • The Ten Commandments of cross-examination, plus four more.
  • An example cross-examination of a defense economist.

* McElhaney, James W., Trial Notebook, The American Bar Association, 1981

 

Topics:  Cross Examination, Expert Testimony, Expert Witness

Published In: Civil Procedure Updates, Personal Injury Updates

DISCLAIMER: Because of the generality of this update, the information provided herein may not be applicable in all situations and should not be acted upon without specific legal advice based on particular situations.

© Brett Murphy PLLC | Attorney Advertising

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