Trademark Misuse Is ^Almost^ Never an Antitrust Injury

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Trademarks are commonly thought to convey no market power. In RJ Machine Co. v. Canada Pipeline Accessories Co., Case No. 1:13-cv-00579-SS (W.D. Tex. Nov. 22, 2013) (Sparks, J.), the court dismissed antitrust claims predicated upon alleged trademark misuse – but interestingly left the door (slightly) open to future claims based on similar conduct.

The case involves flow conditioners in oil pipelines. The defendant had a patent on a type of flow conditioner which expired in 2011. The defendant also obtained a trademark registration for the terms “50E” and “CPA-50E” for certain flow conditioners. Additionally, the defendant allegedly claims the design of its 50E flow conditioner comprises non-functional, distinctive, and protectable trade dress.

The plaintiff (a potential market entrant) claimed that the defendant threatened to sue if the plaintiff advertised or marketed a flow conditioner using the design taught in the expired patent or used the term “50E” to identify its flow conditioner, and brought antitrust and other claims. The court dismissed the antitrust claims because the defendant was allegedly enforcing registered trademarks, and the exercise and enforcement of those marks could not be a “sham” or in “bad faith” under a Noerr-Pennington type analysis.

However, the court did not entirely agree with the defendant that enforcement of trademarks and claimed trade dress can never be considered an antitrust injury because the plaintiff “in order to escape the clutches of an alleged trademark monopoly” can just market its product under a different name. The court noted that

RJ Machine contends the term “50E”, based on the history and development of the market for this product, is the only term consumers associate with this flow conditioner. In addition, according to RJ Machine’s allegations, Canada Pipeline has been able to “lock in” consumers of 50E conditioners because they can only be replaced by flow conditioners with the same 50E design. The anticompetitive argument is even more persuasive when it comes to trade dress. If the 50E design is as functional as RJ Machine alleges, it would be difficult, if not impossible, for RJ Machine to compete in the flow conditioner market without using the same functional design Canada Pipeline is claiming to be its trade dress.

The decision thus leaves open the theoretical possibility that in certain unusual situations, trademark assertion or misuse could lead to antitrust injury.

[View source.]

Topics:  Antitrust Provisions, Trademark Investigations, Trademarks

Published In: Antitrust & Trade Regulation Updates, General Business Updates, Intellectual Property Updates

DISCLAIMER: Because of the generality of this update, the information provided herein may not be applicable in all situations and should not be acted upon without specific legal advice based on particular situations.

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