Why Beyoncé and Jay-Z’s “Blue Ivy Carter” Trademark Application Actually Makes Sense

Over the last few weeks, many have commented about Beyoncé and Jay-Z’s decision to apply for trademark protection for the name of their newborn child — Blue Ivy Carter.  Many have observed that the move will protect Blue Ivy and the family from exploitation, while others have accused the celebrity couple of trying to cash in on their own offspring by making themselves “poised to earn even more thanks to their recent move to trademark their baby’s name.”  But before you make up your mind, let’s stop and think about just how famous this baby is.

Celebrity Babies

For starters, it’s not just the unique name that makes Blue Ivy famous.  After all, plenty of celebrities have kids with bizarre names:  Kal-El Cage (Nicolas Cage), Bear Blu Jarecky (Alicia Silverstone), Pilot Inspektor (Jason Lee), Moxie Crimefighter (Penn Jillette), Fifi Trixibelle (Bob Geldof and Paula Yates), Apple (Gwyneth Paltrow and Chris Martin), Kyd Duchovny (David Duchovny and Tea Leoni), Sage Moonblood (Sylvester Stallone), Prince Michael II a/k/a “Blanket” (Michael Jackson), Dweezil and Moon Unit (Frank Zappa) and, of course, Jermajesty Jackson (Jermaine Jackson).  But how many people can you name that were truly famous during their infancy?  There’s Louise Brown — the world’s first in-vitro baby.  And, of course, Chas Lindbergh (a/k/a the “Lindbergh Baby”).  But that’s about it.

Blue Ivy, on the other hand, is not just famous for her name and parentage.  Within 48 hours of her birth, Jay-Z released the song “Glory,” which incorporated Blue Ivy’s baby-noises and made her the youngest person ever to appear on a billboard chart.  The Huffington Post currently has an entire page dedicated to Blue Ivy, with a tag-line that reads “Some news is so big it needs its own page.”

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