What O.J. Simpson’s Case Did for Domestic Violence

more+
less-

About 20 years ago, a significant shift occurred in how the legal system in California and across the country dealt with domestic violence.  This can be attributed to the murders of Nicole Brown Simpson and Ron Goldman ? her ex-husband O.J. Simpson infamously received a not guilty verdict, despite several incidents of domestic violence that preceded the murder. Today, law enforcement takes a much more aggressive approach in their response to domestic violence related offenses.

Prior to this time, when police were called to a home ? usually by the allegedly abused party (who is usually, but not always, the wife or girlfriend) ? the victim often would recant the complaint and the abusive spouse would get off with no charges filed. However, because prosecutors are determined to break the "cycle of violence," a call today to 911 will trigger very specific legal actions against the alleged abuser, even in circumstances where there is an absence of any physical evidence:

  • He (or she) will likely be booked on charges if a complaint is made, even without corroborating evidence such as bruises or wounds on the victim. A recantation from the victim will not result in dismissal of the charge.
  • The arrest charge level is often a felony, resulting in a felony bail amount of $50,000, even though the alleged act would be considered misdemeanor at worst.
  • If convicted, a person would be subject to penalties such as probation, fines, community labor, mandatory completion of a 52 week batterers program, not mention loss of liberties such a the right to own or possess a firearm.

With a judicial system more strongly bent on prosecution and punishment than ever before, a person accused of domestic violence ? even within the context of divorce, where false accusations are commonly made to gain advantage ? needs solid legal representation. Contact an experienced domestic violence attorney as soon as possible after an accusation is made.

- See more at: http://www.formerdistrictattorneys.com/blog/what-o-j-simpsons-case-did-for-domestic-violence/#top

About 20 years ago, a significant shift occurred in how the legal system in California and across the country dealt with domestic violence.  This can be attributed to the murders of Nicole Brown Simpson and Ron Goldman ? her ex-husband O.J. Simpson infamously received a not guilty verdict, despite several incidents of domestic violence that preceded the murder. Today, law enforcement takes a much more aggressive approach in their response to domestic violence related offenses.

Prior to this time, when police were called to a home ? usually by the allegedly abused party (who is usually, but not always, the wife or girlfriend) ? the victim often would recant the complaint and the abusive spouse would get off with no charges filed. However, because prosecutors are determined to break the "cycle of violence," a call today to 911 will trigger very specific legal actions against the alleged abuser, even in circumstances where there is an absence of any physical evidence:

  • He (or she) will likely be booked on charges if a complaint is made, even without corroborating evidence such as bruises or wounds on the victim. A recantation from the victim will not result in dismissal of the charge.
  • The arrest charge level is often a felony, resulting in a felony bail amount of $50,000, even though the alleged act would be considered misdemeanor at worst.
  • If convicted, a person would be subject to penalties such as probation, fines, community labor, mandatory completion of a 52 week batterers program, not mention loss of liberties such a the right to own or possess a firearm.

With a judicial system more strongly bent on prosecution and punishment than ever before, a person accused of domestic violence ? even within the context of divorce, where false accusations are commonly made to gain advantage ? needs solid legal representation.

Topics:  Criminal Prosecution, Domestic Violence, O.J. Simpson

Published In: Criminal Law Updates

DISCLAIMER: Because of the generality of this update, the information provided herein may not be applicable in all situations and should not be acted upon without specific legal advice based on particular situations.

© Takakjian & Sitkoff, LLP | Attorney Advertising

Don't miss a thing! Build a custom news brief:

Read fresh new writing on compliance, cybersecurity, Dodd-Frank, whistleblowers, social media, hiring & firing, patent reform, the NLRB, Obamacare, the SEC…

…or whatever matters the most to you. Follow authors, firms, and topics on JD Supra.

Create your news brief now - it's free and easy »