FAIL: Union Argues Arbitration Panel Should Ignore Public Employers' Ability to Pay

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Yeah, I know, crazy right? Here is the story. Apparently the Union did not think so. When the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees ("Union") and the City of Philadelphia ("City") could not reach terms on a new collective bargaining agreement, they submitted the dispute to binding interest arbitration.

The Union was seeking, among other things, 8 percent annual wage increases! The City countered that it simply did not have the money to fund the Union's demands. The Union argued that the City's financial health was irrelevant. Huh? How can you pay for something if you don't have any money?

The Union's argument was essentially – cut programs, raise taxes, lay off other workers we don't care; how you pay for our 8 percent annual pay increases is your problem not ours! Insane, right?

Thankfully, the arbitration panel rejected the Union's argument and determined that it was appropriate to consider the City's ability to pay. However, the Union was undeterred. The Union petitioned the court to vacate the arbitration decision, arguing that the panel should not have considered the financial health of the City when rejecting their hefty wage increases. Thankfully, the court disagreed.

The court concluded that the Union's arguments lacked merit, and that it was appropriate for the arbitration panel to consider ability to pay when making decisions regarding wages and other compensation related items.

Thankfully, the arbitration panel and the court brought some sanity to what seemed like an insane dispute. Ability to pay is obviously highly relevant to consideration of pay and benefit demands. Public employers are facing increasing budget constraints these days and are often on the brink of distressed status. When evaluating union demands, public employers must consider their ability to pay and when appropriate explain to the union early and often that the budget simply cannot tolerate increased expenses. Where appropriate, lay the foundation for demonstrating the financial inability to meet the union's demands.

Topics:  Arbitration, Collective Bargaining, Mandatory Arbitration Clauses, Municipalities, Unions

Published In: Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) Updates, Labor & Employment Updates

DISCLAIMER: Because of the generality of this update, the information provided herein may not be applicable in all situations and should not be acted upon without specific legal advice based on particular situations.

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