In-House Law Clinics versus Doctrinal Instruction

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It is the conventional wisdom among today’s academics that law students are better off participating in clinical programs administered in-house by the law schools than taking traditional courses in agency and trust law. Charles E. Rounds, Jr. disagrees and explains why in the attached essay, which was published June 30, 2011 by The National Association of Scholars (NAS) on its website. Rounds’ reasons are both practical and cultural. Simultaneously, the NAS published on the website an essay by David French, Esq., which takes the side of the academics in this debate.

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Published In: Administrative Agency Updates, Education Updates, Professional Malpractice Updates, Securities Updates, Wills, Trusts, & Estate Planning Updates

DISCLAIMER: Because of the generality of this update, the information provided herein may not be applicable in all situations and should not be acted upon without specific legal advice based on particular situations.

© Charles E. Rounds, Jr., Suffolk University Law School | Attorney Advertising

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Charles E. Rounds, Jr.
Suffolk University Law School

Professor of Law, Suffolk University Law School. Tenure granted: 1990. Author: Loring and... View Profile »


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