Sapin II Law: The New French Anticorruption System| La Loi Sapin II: Le nouveau dispositif français anti-corruption

Morgan Lewis
Contact

Morgan Lewis

Français

The new system strengthens the French anticorruption arsenal from this year, drawing upon the US and UK regimes.

Law No. 2016-1691, known as “Sapin II Law”, is aimed at bringing French legislation in line with the most exacting European and international standards in the fight against corruption and at improving France’s image on the matter abroad. Indeed, until then, France was ranked only 23rd with a score of 69 out of 100, according to the Corruption Perceptions Index 2016 published on the website of the NGO, Transparency International.

The Sapin II Law is modelled, in particular, on the US (Foreign Corrupt Practices Act or FCPA – 1977) and UK (United Kingdom Bribery Act – 2010) anticorruption regimes.

Most provisions of the Sapin II Law entered into force in June 2017.

Significant Features

The main additional provisions of the Sapin II Law are the following:

  1. Creation of an anticorruption structure: Agence française anticorruption (AFA, the French anticorruption agency)
  2. Implementation of a program to prevent and detect corruption for the relevant companies with at least 500 employees and a turnover exceeding €100 million ($119.5 million)
  3. Establishment of a criminal settlement procedure, restricted to corporate entities, referred to as convention judiciaire d’intérêt public (judicial convention in the public interest), to avoid being convicted
  4. Extension of the extraterritorial application of French criminal law in international corruption matters
  5. Increased protection of whistleblower status and broadening of the definition thereof

1. Creation of an anticorruption structure: Agence française anticorruption

The AFA falls within the remit of the ministers of justice and of budget. It replaces the Service central de prévention de la corruption (SCPC, Central Corruption Prevention Department) with reinforced powers and broadened duties.

It is primarily entrusted with advisory, assistance, and control tasks, notably by

  • participating in preventing and detecting acts of corruption, influence peddling, misappropriation, illegal taking of interest, embezzlement of public funds, and favoritism;
  • drafting recommendations to help corporate entities comply with their obligations and implement appropriate internal procedures to prevent and detect corruption;
  • checking the reality and efficiency of the anticorruption compliance mechanisms in place, in particular by companies; and
  • punishing any identified breaches.

The AFA also ensures observance of Law No. 68-678 of 26 July 1968 (known as “Blocking Statute”) governing the procedure applicable in disclosing sensitive data outside French territory.

2. Implementation of a program to prevent and detect corruption for the relevant companies with at least 500 employees and a turnover exceeding100 million

Scope

Article 17 of the Sapin II Law introduces a system for corruption prevention and detection aiming to prevent and detect acts of corruption or influence peddling, in France or abroad, for companies

  • with at least 500 employees, or belonging to a group of companies whose parent company has its registered office in France and which hires at least 500 employees, AND
  • whose turnover or consolidated turnover exceeds €100 million.

For subsidiaries[1] and controlled companies[2], a distinction should be made according to whether a French or a foreign group is concerned:

  • Subsidiary or controlled company of a French group: Article 17 of the Sapin II Law applies to companies that do not have their registered office in France and that do not meet the conditions relating to the number of employees and turnover provided that (i) the parent company located in France generates a consolidated turnover in excess of €100 million and (ii) the group to which it belongs hires more than 500 employees.
  • Subsidiary or controlled company of a foreign group: Article 17 does not apply (unless the subsidiary or controlled company itself hires at least 500 employees and generates a turnover in excess €100 million).

The corporate entity and its management are both in charge of implementing this system, and they may both incur criminal liability.

Content of the system for corruption prevention and detection

The anticorruption system within the relevant companies must include

  • a code of conduct defining the types of behavior to be prohibited as they are likely to constitute acts of corruption or influence peddling. This code of conduct will have to be incorporated into the company’s rules of procedure;
  • an internal whistleblowing system intended to allow collecting the alerts issued by employees regarding situations that are contrary to the company’s code of conduct;
  • a risks mapping intended to identify risks according to the business lines and geographical areas where the company carries out business;
  • procedures for assessing the situation of clients, first and middle-tier suppliers in the light of the risks mapping;
  • accounting controls, whether internal or external, intended to make sure the books, registers, and accounts are not used to conceal acts of corruption or influence peddling;
  • a training program intended for the executives and staff members who are most exposed to risks of corruption and influence peddling;
  • disciplinary arrangements for imposing penalties on the company’s employees in case of breach of the company’s code of conduct; and
  • a system for internal control and assessment of the implemented measures.

Penalties

When a breach is identified, the AFA’s commission des sanctions (enforcement committee) can order the company to adapt its corruption prevention and detection system within a time period it shall determine (not to exceed three years), but can also impose a financial penalty of up to €200,000 ($239,000) for individuals and up to €1 million ($1.19 million) for corporate entities (this amount being “proportionate to the seriousness of the breaches established and to the financial situation of the relevant individual or corporate entity”).

In case of conviction for acts of corruption, the company may be compelled to complete, under the AFA’s control, for a maximum period of five years, a compliance program to establish the existence and implementation of the corruption prevention and detection system.

Finally, the AFA can order the publication of its decisions, which could harm the company’s image.

3. Establishment of a criminal settlement procedure, referred to as convention judiciaire d'intérêt public (judicial convention in the public interest)

The Sapin II Law introduces a criminal settlement procedure called “convention judiciaire d’intérêt public” (CJIP) (judicial convention in the public interest) for such offences as corruption, influence peddling, and laundering the proceeds of tax fraud. This procedure is similar to the deferred prosecution agreement (DPA) in US and UK laws.

The CJIP is restricted to corporate entities. It can be proposed either before the initiation of any public action or when the criminal proceedings have already been commenced.

Subject to the approval of the public prosecutor or the examining magistrate, the CJIP may impose one or more of the following obligations:

  • Payment of a fine (known as “in the public interest”) determined proportionally to the benefits resulting from the identified breaches, which can reach up to 30% of the company’s average turnover calculated over the previous three years.
  • Implementation, under the AFA’s control, for a maximum of three years, of an anticorruption compliance program.
  • Payment of damages to the victim of the offence, if identified.

First application

The first CJIP was entered into on 14 November 2017, in the HSBC Private Bank Suisse SA case, in the context of the investigation for aggravated laundering the proceeds of tax fraud of €1.6 billion ($1.9 billion), where HSBC had been placed under judicial examination on 18 November 2014. HSBC accepted to pay a fine of €300 million ($358.6 million). Two former executives are still being criminally prosecuted.

Airbus is the first French company to use this procedure that can eventually lead to a CJIP, in return for its self-reporting and the implementation of preventive measures.

Advantages

This CJIP does not give rise to a conviction certificate and has neither the nature nor the effects of a criminal conviction sentence (it is therefore not entered in Section 1 of the criminal record). Moreover, the information provided by the company as part of this procedure cannot be used for potential future criminal proceedings.

Disadvantages

The CJIP is published in a press release of the public prosecutor and on the AFA’s website.

4. Extension of the extraterritorial application of French criminal law in international corruption matters

The Sapin II Law extends the territorial scope of corruption and influence peddling offences involving non-French individuals or corporate entities.

French criminal law is henceforth applicable when acts of corruption or influence peddling are committed abroad not only by a French citizen or by a person usually residing in France but also by a person “carrying out all or part of his economic activity on the French territory” (Article 435-11-2 of the Criminal Code).

This concept remains to be clarified (will the simple entry into a contract in France, sale of a product in France, solicitation of French clients, or payment of dividends to French companies suffice to be deemed to form “part of the economic activity”?), but should contribute to widening the extraterritorial scope of French criminal law.

5. Increased protection of whistleblower status and broadening of the definition thereof

Article 6 of the Sapin II Law defines a whistleblower as “an individual who discloses or reports, in a disinterested manner and in good faith, a crime or an offence, a serious and manifest breach of an international commitment duly ratified or approved by France, an unilateral act of an international organization adopted on the basis of such a commitment, of the law or regulations, or a serious threat or harm to general interest, which he or she has become personally aware of”.

While whistleblowing mechanisms already existed in certain areas, the Sapin II Law has created a common set of rights to all whistleblowers. These rights, the non-application of which is criminally punished, include inter alia

  • the guarantee to preserve the whistleblower’s anonymity;
  • the prohibition to dismiss, penalize, or discriminate against the whistleblower who has observed the whistleblowing procedure; and
  • the whistleblower’s lack of criminal liability provided that the definition criteria laid out by the Sapin II Law are fulfilled, that disclosure of the information “is necessary and proportionate to safeguard the interests at stake” and that it is made in compliance with the whistleblowing procedures.

However, the Sapin II Law does not provide for an incentive system for whistleblowers like those in place in the United States, where the whistleblower can receive a portion of the fines imposed on the company that breached its obligations.


[1] Within the meaning of Article L. 233-1 of the Commercial Code.

[2] Within the meaning of Article L. 233-3 of the Commercial Code.



English

Principaux points de ce nouveau dispositif, qui renforce l’arsenal anti-corruption français depuis cette année, en s’inspirant des régimes américain et anglais.

La loi n°2016-1691, dite « loi Sapin II », a pour objet d’aligner la législation française sur les standards européens et internationaux les plus exigeants, en matière de lutte contre la corruption et d’améliorer l’image de la France en la matière, à l’étranger. En effet, jusque-là la France n’arrivait qu’au 23ème rang avec un score de 69 sur 100, selon l’index de perception de la corruption 2016 publié sur le site Internet de l’ONG Transparency International.

La loi Sapin II s’inspire, notamment, des régimes anti-corruption américains (Foreign Corrupt Practice Act ou FCPA – 1977) et anglais (United Kingdom Bribery Act – 2010).

La plupart des dispositions de la loi Sapin II sont entrées en vigueur en juin 2017.

Ce que vous devez retenir

Les principaux apports de la loi Sapin II, sont les suivants:

  1. Création d’une structure de lutte anti-corruption: l’Agence française anti-corruption (« AFA »)
  2. Mise en place d’un programme de prévention et de détection de la corruption pour les entreprises concernées d’au moins 500 salariés et réalisant un chiffre d’affaires supérieur à 100 millions d’euros
  3. Institution d’une procédure de transaction pénale, limitée aux personnes morales, intitulée convention judiciaire d’intérêt public, pour éviter une condamnation
  4. Extension de l’application extraterritoriale du droit pénal français en matière de corruption internationale
  5. Amélioration de la protection du statut de lanceur d’alerte et élargissement de sa définition

1. Création d’une structure de lutte anti-corruption: l’Agence française anticorruption

L’AFA dépend des ministres de la justice et du budget. Elle remplace le Service central de prévention de la corruption (« SCPC ») avec des pouvoirs renforcés et un élargissement de sa mission.

Elle assure principalement des missions de conseil, d’assistance et de contrôle en

  • participant à la prévention et à détection des faits de corruption, de trafic d’influence, de concussion, de prise illégale d’intérêt, de détournement de fonds publics et de favoritisme ;
  • élaborant des recommandations destinées à aider les personnes morales à respecter leurs obligations et à adopter des procédures internes adéquates pour empêcher et détecter la corruption ;
  • contrôlant la réalité et l’efficience des mécanismes de conformité anticorruption mis en œuvre, notamment par les sociétés ; et
  • sanctionnant les manquements constatés.

L’AFA veille aussi au respect de la loi n° 68-678 du 26 juillet 1968 (dite loi de blocage ou « Blocking Statute ») régissant la procédure applicable à la communication hors du territoire français des informations sensibles.

2. Mise en place d’un programme de prévention et de détection de la corruption pour les entreprises concernées d’au moins 500 salariés et réalisant un chiffre d’affaires supérieur à 100 millions d’euros

Champ d’application

L’article 17 de la loi Sapin II met en place un dispositif de prévention et de détection de la corruption destiné à prévenir et à détecter les faits de corruption ou de trafic d'influence, en France ou à l'étranger, pour les sociétés

  • employant au moins 500 salariés, ou appartenant à un groupe de sociétés dont la société-mère a son siège social en France et dont l'effectif comprend au moins 500 salariés, ET
  • dont le chiffre d'affaires ou le chiffre d'affaires consolidé est supérieur à 100 millions d'euros.

Pour les filiales[1] et les sociétés contrôlées[2], il faut distinguer selon qu’il s’agit d’un groupe français ou étranger:

  • Filiale ou société contrôlée d’un groupe français: l’article 17 de la loi Sapin II s’applique à une société n’ayant pas son siège social en France et ne remplissant pas les conditions de nombre de salariés et de chiffre d’affaires dès lors que (i) la société-mère située en France réalise un chiffre d'affaires consolidé supérieur à 100 millions d’euros et (ii) que le groupe auquel elle appartient emploie plus de 500 salariés.
  • Filiale ou société contrôlée d’un groupe étranger: l’article 17 ne s’applique pas (sauf si la filiale ou la société contrôlée emploie elle-même au moins 500 salariés et réalise un chiffre d’affaires de plus de 100 millions d’euros).

Sont responsables de la mise en place de ce dispositif à la fois la personne morale et ses dirigeants, qui peuvent tous deux engager leur responsabilité pénale.

Contenu du dispositif de prévention et de détection de la corruption

Le dispositif anti-corruption au sein des sociétés concernées doit comprendre

  • un code de conduite définissant les comportements à proscrire car susceptibles de caractériser des faits de corruption ou de trafic d'influence. Ce code de conduite devra être intégré au règlement intérieur de l'entreprise ;
  • un dispositif d'alerte interne destiné à permettre le recueil des signalements émanant d'employés concernant des situations contraires au code de conduite de la société ;
  • une cartographie des risques destinée à identifier les risques en fonction des secteurs d’activités et des zones géographiques dans lesquelles l’entreprise exerce son activité ;
  • des procédures d'évaluation de la situation des clients, fournisseurs de premier rang et intermédiaires au regard de la cartographie des risques ;
  • des procédures de contrôles comptables, internes ou externes, destinées à s'assurer que les livres, registres et comptes ne sont pas utilisés pour masquer des faits de corruption ou de trafic d'influence ;
  • un programme de formation destiné aux cadres et aux personnels les plus exposés aux risques de corruption et de trafic d'influence ;
  • un régime disciplinaire permettant de sanctionner les salariés de la société en cas de violation du code de conduite de la société ; et
  • un dispositif de contrôle et d'évaluation interne des mesures mises en œuvre.

Sanctions

En cas de manquement constaté, la commission des sanctions de l’AFA peut enjoindre à la société d’adapter son dispositif de prévention et de détection des faits de corruption dans un délai qu’elle fixe (ne pouvant excéder 3 ans) mais aussi prononcer une sanction pécuniaire d’un montant pouvant aller jusqu’à 200.000 euros pour les personnes physiques et jusqu’à 1 million d’euros pour les personnes morales (le montant étant « proportionné à la gravité des manquements constatés et à la situation financière de la personne physique ou morale sanctionnée »).

En cas de condamnation pour des faits de corruption, la société pourra être contrainte de se soumettre, sous le contrôle de l'AFA, pour une durée maximale de cinq ans, à un programme de mise en conformité destiné à s'assurer de l'existence et de la mise en œuvre en du dispositif de prévention et de détection des faits de corruption.

Enfin, l’AFA pourra ordonner la publication de ses décisions, mesure pouvant porter préjudice à l’image de la société sanctionnée.

3. Institution d’une procédure de transaction pénale, intitulée convention judiciaire d’intérêt public

La loi Sapin II crée une procédure de transaction pénale appelée « convention judiciaire d’intérêt public » (« CJIP ») pour les délits de corruption, trafic d’influence, blanchiment de fraude fiscale et infractions connexes.

Cette procédure est comparable au deferred prosecution agreement (« DPA ») en droit américain ou anglais, en la matière.

La CJIP est limitée aux personnes morales. Elle peut être proposée aussi bien avant que l’action publique a été mise en mouvement ou une fois les poursuites pénales déjà initiées.

En cas d’accord du procureur ou du juge d’instruction, la CJIP pourra imposer une ou plusieurs des obligations suivantes :

  • Le paiement d’une amende (dite « d’intérêt public ») fixée de manière proportionnée aux avantages tirés des manquements constatés, son montant peut atteindre jusqu’à 30% du chiffre d’affaires moyen de la société calculé sur les trois dernières années.
  • La mise en place, sous le contrôle de l’AFA, pendant une durée maximum de 3 ans, d’un programme de conformité anti-corruption.
  • Le paiement de dommages-intérêts à la victime de l’infraction lorsque celle-ci est identifiée.

Première application

La première CJIP a été conclue le 14 novembre 2017, dans l’affaire HSBC Private Bank Suisse SA, dans le cadre de l’enquête pour blanchiment aggravé de fraude fiscale à hauteur de 1,6 milliards d’euros, dans laquelle HSBC avait été mise en examen le 18 novembre 2014. HSBC a accepté de payer une amende de 300 millions d’euros. Deux anciens dirigeants restent pénalement poursuivis.

Airbus est la première entreprise française à utiliser cette procédure pouvant aboutir à une CJIP à terme, en contrepartie de son auto-dénonciation et de la mise en place de mesures préventives.

Avantages

Cette CJIP n’emporte pas de déclaration de culpabilité et n’a ni la nature ni les effets d’un jugement de condamnation pénale (elle n’est ainsi pas inscrite au bulletin n°1 du casier judiciaire). De plus, les informations communiquées par la société durant cette procédure ne pourront être utilisées lors d’éventuelles poursuites pénales ultérieures.

Inconvénients

La CJIP fait l'objet d'un communiqué de presse du procureur de la République et est publiée sur le site Internet de l’AFA.

4. Extension de l’application extraterritoriale du droit pénal français en matière de corruption internationale

La loi Sapin II étend le champ d’application territorial des infractions de corruption et de trafic d’influence impliquant des personnes physiques ou morales de nationalité étrangère.

Dorénavant, la loi pénale française est applicable lorsque des faits de corruption ou de trafic d’influence sont commis à l’étranger non seulement par un Français ou par une personne résidant habituellement en France mais aussi par une personne « exerçant tout ou partie de son activité économique sur le territoire français » (article 435-11-2 du Code pénal).
Cette notion reste à préciser (la simple conclusion d’un contrat en France, la vente de produit en France, le démarchage de clients français, le paiement de dividendes à des sociétés françaises seront-ils suffisants pour être considérés comme une « partie de l’activité économique » ?) mais devrait entraîner un élargissement du champ d’application extraterritorial du droit pénal français.

5. Amélioration de la protection du statut de lanceur d’alerte et élargissement de sa définition

L’article 6 de la loi Sapin II définit le lanceur d’alerte comme « une personne physique qui révèle ou signale, de manière désintéressée et de bonne foi, un crime ou un délit, une violation grave et manifeste d'un engagement international régulièrement ratifié ou approuvé par la France, d'un acte unilatéral d'une organisation internationale pris sur le fondement d'un tel engagement, de la loi ou du règlement, ou une menace ou un préjudice graves pour l'intérêt général, dont elle a eu personnellement connaissance ».

Si des mécanismes d’alerte existaient déjà dans certains domaines, la loi Sapin II a créé un socle de droits communs à tous les lanceurs d’alerte. Au rang de ces droits, dont l’inapplication est pénalement sanctionnée, figurent notamment :

  • la garantie de la préservation de l’anonymat du lanceur d’alerte;
  • l’interdiction de licencier, sanctionner ou discriminer le lanceur d’alerte qui a respecté la procédure de signalement des alertes; et
  • l’irresponsabilité pénale du lanceur d’alerte dès lors que les critères de définition fixés par la loi Sapin II sont remplis, que la divulgation de l’information « est nécessaire et proportionnée à la sauvegarde des intérêts en cause » et qu'elle intervient dans le respect des procédures de signalement des alertes.

En revanche, la loi Sapin II ne prévoit pas de système d’intéressement des dénonciateurs comme cela peut exister aux Etats-Unis où le dénonciateur peut percevoir un pourcentage des amendes prononcées contre la société ayant manqué à ses obligations.


[1] Au sens de l’article L. 233-1 du Code de commerce.

[2] Au sens de l’article L. 233-3 du Code de commerce.

 

DISCLAIMER: Because of the generality of this update, the information provided herein may not be applicable in all situations and should not be acted upon without specific legal advice based on particular situations.

© Morgan Lewis | Attorney Advertising

Written by:

Morgan Lewis
Contact
more
less

Morgan Lewis on:

Reporters on Deadline

"My best business intelligence, in one easy email…"

Your first step to building a free, personalized, morning email brief covering pertinent authors and topics on JD Supra:
*By using the service, you signify your acceptance of JD Supra's Privacy Policy.
Custom Email Digest
- hide
- hide

This website uses cookies to improve user experience, track anonymous site usage, store authorization tokens and permit sharing on social media networks. By continuing to browse this website you accept the use of cookies. Click here to read more about how we use cookies.