Social Links: NJ court allows police to read suspects’ private messages; tech companies’ increased control over users’ devices; an app that blocks political posts

Morrison & Foerster LLP - Social Media
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A New Jersey court rules that state police can examine a suspect’s private social media messages without having to apply for an order under the state’s wiretapping laws.

Technology companies are exercising a lot of control ever over users’ devices remotely, and it’s implicating privacy issues.

Social media companies are reportedly considering putting up on their platforms police icons that will allow police officers in the UK to access the chats of users who click the icons when they feel threatened.

With the help of bots and cyborgs, a 68-year-old Chicago retiree posts more than 1,000 pro-Republican messages to Twitter a day.

Interested in a good, basic—but comprehensive—overview of blockchain and its potential impact that can be read in one sitting? Here it is.

Here are some tips on how brands can use social artificial intelligence to their advantage.

Weary of all the political posts in your newsfeed? Try this app.

Guess which celebrity  posted the first Instagram photo to win more than 7.2 million likes in less than 24 hours?

A robot developed by Google could be representative of how robots “look and operate in the future.” It’s also a little creepy.

[View source.]

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