SPECIAL REPORT: Fintech, Regtech and the Role of compliance in 2020: Executive Summary (Part One)

Authors: Susannah Hammond & Ashley Kovas

The ebb and flow of attitudes on the adoption and use of technology has evolving ramifications for firms and their compliance functions, according to the findings of Thomson Reuters Regulatory Intelligence’s fourth annual survey assessing the impact of developments in fintech and regtech on the role of the compliance function in financial services. This year's survey results represent the views and experiences of almost 400 compliance and risk practitioners worldwide. During the lifetime of the report it has had nearly 2,000 responses and been downloaded nearly 10,000 times by firms, risk and compliance practitioners, regulators, consultancies, law firms and global systemically-important financial institutions (G-SIFIs).

The report also highlights the shifting role of the regulator and concerns about best or better practice approaches to tackle the rise of cyber risk.

The findings have become a trusted source of insight for firms, regulators and their advisers alike. They are intended to help regulated firms with planning, resourcing and direction, and to allow them to benchmark whether their resources, skills, strategy and expectations are in line with those of the wider industry. As with previous reports, regional and G-SIFI results are split out where they highlight any particular trend.

One challenge for firms is the need to acquire the skill sets which are essential if they are to reap the expected benefits of technological solutions. Equally, regulators and policymakers need to have the appropriate up-to-date skillsets to enable consistent oversight of the use of technology in financial services. Firms themselves, and G-SIFIs in particular, have made substantial investments in skills and the upgrading of legacy systems.

Key findings

  • The involvement of risk and compliance functions in their firm's approach to fintech, regtech and insurtech continues to evolve. Some 65% of firms reported their risk and compliance function was either fully engaged and consulted or had some involvement (59% in prior year). In the G-SIFI population 69% reported at least some involvement with those reporting their compliance function as being fully engaged and consulted almost doubling from 13% to 25%. There is an even more positive picture presented on increasing board involvement in the firm's approach to fintech, regtech and insurtech. A total of 62% of firms reported their board being fully engaged and consulted or having some involvement, up from 54% in the prior year. For G-SIFIs 85% reported their board being fully engaged and consulted or having some involvement, up from 56% in the prior year. In particular, 37% of G-SIFIs reported their board was fully engaged with and consulted on the firm's approach to fintech, regtech and insurtech, up from 13% in the prior year.
  • Opinion on technological innovation and digital disruption has fluctuated in the past couple of years. Overall, the level of positivity about fintech innovation and digital disruption has increased, after a slight dip in 2018. In 2019, 83% of firms have a positive view of fintech innovation (23% extremely positive, 60% mostly positive), compared with 74% in 2018 and 83% in 2017. In the G-SIFI population the positivity rises to 92%. There are regional variations, with the UK and Europe reporting a 97% positive view at one end going down to a 75% positive view in the United States.
  • There has been a similar ebb and flow of opinion about regtech innovation and digital disruption although at lower levels. A total of 77% reported either an extremely or mostly positive view, up from 71% in the prior year. For G-SIFIs 81% had a positive view, up from 76% in the prior year.
  • G-SIFIs have reported a significant investment in specialist skills for both risk and compliance functions and at board level. Some 21% of G-SIFIs reported they had invested in and/or appointed people with specialist skills to the board to accommodate developments in fintech, insurtech and regtech, up from 2% in the prior year. This means in turn 79% of G-SIFIs have not completed their work in this area, which is potentially disturbing. Similarly, 25% of G-SIFIs have invested in specialist skills for the risk and compliance functions, up from 9% in the prior year. In the wider population 10% reported investing in specialist skills at board level and 16% reported investing in specialist skills for the risk and compliance function. A quarter (26%) reported they have yet to invest in specialist skills for the risk and compliance function, but they know it is needed (32% for board-level specialist skills). Again, these figures suggest 75% of G-SIFIs have not fully upgraded their risk and compliance functions, rising to 84% in the wider population.
  • The greatest financial technology challenge firms expect to face in the next 12 months have changed in nature since the previous survey, with the top three challenges cited as keeping up with technological advancements; budgetary limitations, lack of investment and cost; and data security. In prior years, the biggest challenges related to the need to upgrade legacy systems and processes as well as budgetary limitations, the adequacy and availability of skilled resources together with the need for cyber resilience. In terms of the greatest benefits expected to be seen from financial technology in the next 12 months the top three are a strengthening of operational efficiency, improved services for customers and greater business opportunities.
  • G-SIFIs are leading the way on the implementation of regtech solutions. Some 14% of G-SIFIs have implemented a regtech solution, up from 9% in the prior year with 75% (52% in the prior year) reporting they have either fully or partially implemented a regtech solution to help manage compliance. In the wider population, 17% reported implementing a regtech solution, up from 8% in the prior year. The 2018 numbers overall showed a profound dip from 2017 when 29% of G-SIFIs and 30% of firms reported implementing a regtech solution, perhaps highlighting that early adoption of regtech solutions was less than smooth.
  • Where firms has not yet deployed fintech or regtech solutions various reasons were cited as to what was holding them back. Significantly, one third of firms cited lack of investment; a similar number of firms pointed to a lack of in-house skills and information security/data protection concerns. Some 14% of firms and 12% of G-SIFIs reported they had taken a deliberate strategic decision not to deploy fintech or regtech solutions yet.
  • There continues to be substantial variation in the overall budget available for regtech solutions. A total of 38% of firms (31% in prior year) reported that the expected budget would grow in the coming year, however, 31% said they lack a budget for regtech (25% in the prior year). For G-SIFIs 48% expected the budget to grow (36% in prior year), with 12% reporting no budget for regtech solutions (6% in the prior year).

We hope the findings are useful in developing and benchmarking your firm's practices.

Read the full report here and subscribe to our page updates for upcoming extract releases.

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Thomson Reuters Regulatory Intelligence and Compliance Learning
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