White House Releases First-Ever “National Strategy On Gender Equity And Equality”

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Seyfarth Synopsis: Following the March 8, 2021 Executive Order establishing the White House Gender Policy Council, on October 22, 2021 the White House released the first-ever U.S. Government National Strategy on Gender Equity and Equality. The EEOC contributed to the Strategy and supports its full implementation, suggesting that gender-related issues – including the gender wage gap – may be among the Commission’s top priorities in its FY 2022 enforcement agenda.

As part of President Biden’s March 8, 2021 Executive Order 14020 establishing the White House Gender Policy Council (see here), on October 22, 2021 the White House released the first-ever U.S. Government National Strategy on Gender Equity and Equality (available here).

The Strategy has three main sections. Section One establishes guiding principles undergirding the strategy to advance gender equity and equality. Section Two outlines the following ten interconnected priorities: (1) economic security; (2) gender-based violence; (3) health; (4) education; (5) justice and immigration; (6) human rights and equality under the law; (7) security and humanitarian relief; (8) climate change; (9) science and technology; and (10) democracy, participation, and leadership. Section Three elaborates on the whole-of-government effort that is required for implementation, ensuring that a focus on gender is mainstreamed across the work of the federal government.

Strategy On Improving Economic Security And Accelerating Economic Growth

The Strategy Paper’s “economic security” priority includes subsections on “Promoting Economic Competitiveness by Advancing Women’s Employment in Well-Paying Jobs” and “Addressing Persistent Gender Discrimination and Systemic Barriers to Full Workforce Participation.” Under the Strategy Paper, the White House will “ensure that women have the support they need to enter, stay, and advance in the labor force, and encourage their access to well-paying, good quality jobs,” “ensure that women have a free and fair choice to join a union and that domestic workers receive the legal benefits and protections they deserve,” and “seek increased pay for jobs that are disproportionately held by women by pursuing an increase in the minimum wage and the elimination of the tipped minimum wage and the subminimum wage for all workers, including those with disabilities.”

Furthermore, to close the gender wage gap in the U.S., the White House will “work to strengthen laws prohibiting wage discrimination on the basis of gender, race, and other characteristics, and . . . increase resources for enforcement,” “promote pay transparency, taking steps to increase analysis of pay gaps on the basis of gender, race, and other factors, and outline plans to eliminate these disparities,” “pursue policies to eliminate reliance on prior salary history in compensation decisions, which can perpetuate and compound the effects of prior discrimination,” and “support policies to prohibit discrimination against pregnant and parenting workers.” To eliminate harassment and other forms of workplace discrimination, the White House will support “increasing transparency and accountability by ending forced arbitration and mandatory nondisclosure agreements that prevent workers from pursuing their day in court and by strengthening prevention efforts to create a work environment where all workers can thrive.”

Section III (“Implementation”) requires each federal agency to establish at least three goals to advance the Strategy’s objectives, and detail the plans and resources needed to achieve their goals. Specifically, “agencies should identify, under the auspices of their three priority goals: (i) the gender gaps they aim to close; (ii) outcome measures; and (iii) budgetary, staff, and other needs to achieve targeted objectives.” To ensure effective implementation of the Strategy Paper, the White House will also “embark on a government-wide effort to strengthen data collection and analysis and close gender data gaps.”

EEOC “Supports Full Implementation” Of White House Strategy

The EEOC issued a press release (see here) the same day the Strategy Paper was released, noting the Commission’s contribution to the White House’s Strategy Paper and supporting its full implementation. EEOC Chair Charlotte A. Burrows stated:

The COVID-19 pandemic’s disparate impact on women generally and women of color in particular makes it more urgent than ever to ensure that gender is not a barrier to economic security and opportunities in the workplace. This strategy’s goals to promote pay equity, eliminate harassment and other forms of employment discrimination, and support the nation’s caregivers are all important EEOC priorities.

As previously noted (here), the EEOC’s litigation enforcement activity showed signs of recovering in fiscal year 2021 following the Commission’s down year in FY 2020 – forecasting a busy year in FY 2021 for the EEOC and employers. The EEOC’s public support for full implementation of the White House’s National Strategy on Gender Equity and Equality indicates that issues relating to gender equity may be priorities for the Commission in FY 2022.

DISCLAIMER: Because of the generality of this update, the information provided herein may not be applicable in all situations and should not be acted upon without specific legal advice based on particular situations.

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