In This Issue:

- Harassment. Are your executive training programs effective?

- State Round-Up. Learn about the latest employment law news in your state

- Unions. Harold Coxson and Baker Wyche discuss the new proposed persuader regulations and their potential

impact on your workplace

- O-D News. Firm expands international presence with London office

- Supreme Court. The new term has begun— what’s in store for employers?

- “You Say ADA, I Say FMLA” Worker’s Failure To Return From Leave Justified Her Discharge

- ICE Changes Its Position On Form I-9, Again Finds Pre-Population Of Data May Be Allowed

- The Rise Of “Worker Centers”: Big Labor’s Trojan Horse

- Excerpt from Harassment. Are your executive training programs effective?:

Recently, after the mayor of a major U.S. city was forced to resign amid allegations of sexual harassment, I was asked by several people if I believed that the problem was a lack of training. “After all,” one person reasoned, “the mayor did say that he missed the anti-harassment training and was unaware that what he did could be considered harassment.” My answer was, “It depends” (a popular lawyer response). Whether or not training would have made a difference depends on several factors, including: where the emphasis would have been placed in the training; and his openness to the message of the training.

In my experience, the most important variable in helping executives understand harassment is program emphasis. Many executive training programs (those geared toward C-suite occupants) misplace the focus. While it is important to address the types of harassment such as quid pro quo (tangible job harassment) and hostile work environment, two issues continue to trip up many at the head of their organizations: (1) the extension of the workplace; and (2) the relationship between power and feelings.

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