What Happens to Your Debts When You Die?

Chambliss, Bahner & Stophel, P.C.
Contact

Chambliss, Bahner & Stophel, P.C.When you die, your debts do not expire with you. Most debt still needs to be paid off, if possible. However, who is responsible for paying the debt depends on the type of debt, and some assets are protected from being used to satisfy a debt.

Outstanding debt may include mortgages, credit card bills, car loans, personal loans, or condominium fees -- even car leases, where death is considered “early termination” of a contract.

Usually your estate is responsible for paying any debts you leave behind. If the estate does not have enough money, the debts will go unpaid. In general, debt collectors may not try to collect payment from your relatives and heirs. However, there are some exceptions. Co-signers and guarantors of a particular debt are responsible for that debt, and someone who held property jointly with you would be responsible for any debts on the joint property. In addition, spouses in “community property” states -- states where property acquired during marriage is owned jointly by both spouses -- may be responsible for some debt.

Creditors are paid from the part of your estate that passes through probate, which means any property that passes through a will. The person who is appointed personal representative or executor of your estate is responsible for making sure the creditors are paid. The personal representative uses estate assets to pay off the debts before any money passes to heirs. If you have significant debts, it is possible that your entire estate will be used to pay creditors.

Creditors cannot be paid from any assets that pass directly to a beneficiary. For example, a jointly held bank account would pass directly to the joint owner, and the funds in that account could not be used to pay creditors. Similarly, life insurance policies pass directly to the beneficiaries, so creditors do not have access to those funds. Whether or not a creditor can access funds in a trust depends on state law as well as what kind of trust it is. Consult with your attorney to determine if your assets are protected.

DISCLAIMER: Because of the generality of this update, the information provided herein may not be applicable in all situations and should not be acted upon without specific legal advice based on particular situations.

© Chambliss, Bahner & Stophel, P.C. | Attorney Advertising

Written by:

Chambliss, Bahner & Stophel, P.C.
Contact
more
less

Chambliss, Bahner & Stophel, P.C. on:

Reporters on Deadline

"My best business intelligence, in one easy email…"

Your first step to building a free, personalized, morning email brief covering pertinent authors and topics on JD Supra:
*By using the service, you signify your acceptance of JD Supra's Privacy Policy.
Custom Email Digest
- hide
- hide

This website uses cookies to improve user experience, track anonymous site usage, store authorization tokens and permit sharing on social media networks. By continuing to browse this website you accept the use of cookies. Click here to read more about how we use cookies.