Defamation Copyright

Defamation is a false statement, either written or oral, that harms the reputation of another person. In order to recover for defamation, a victim must establish that 1) the statement was false 2) the statement... more +
Defamation is a false statement, either written or oral, that harms the reputation of another person. In order to recover for defamation, a victim must establish that 1) the statement was false 2) the statement was communicated or published to a third party 3) the defendant caused the statement to be communicated or published, either intentionally or at least negligently 4) some harm was suffered as a result. less -
News & Analysis as of

An Update On The Legal Implications Of User-Generated Content: Facebook, Youtube, Twitter, And Instagram

Traditionally, media companies (as well as non-media companies) almost exclusively utilized their own content. However, because of the exponential growth in the public’s desire and ability to interconnect through social media...more

Copyright As An Online Reputation Management Tool: A Round Hole For A Square Peg

So, how is copyright law doing as an online reputation management tool? We have written many times recently about the use of copyright law to do what defamation law can’t: take stuff down from the internet. A...more

A Tough Assignment: The Use of Copyright Law to Squelch, and Preserve, Negative Online Reviews of Doctors and Lawyers

There are few things more terrifying to a doctor, lawyer or other professional than a bad online review. Online reviews are frequently uncivil, often indelible and in some cases outright false. Meanwhile, Section 230 of the...more

Another Piece of the Puzzle: Social Media Concerns (Just) Outside the Employment Relationship

This blog has focused heavily on social media-related issues that arise in the employer/employee relationship and that have been a continual challenge for employers over the last decade. Employment-related social media issues...more

A Legal Guide To The Use Of Social Media In The Workplace

In This Issue: - Introduction - Social Media And The Employment Relationship - Wage And Hour Considerations - Discrimination Laws - Protected Activity Laws - Applicant Screening...more

Private-Sector Employers: Updating Your Social Media Policies - BB&K's Joseph Ortiz Writes About the Ever-Evolving Regulations...

Most companies focus their social media policies almost entirely on listing the things the employer finds unacceptable to post and share: - Avoid defamation, obscenities or other inappropriate content. - Never...more

Business Law Newsletter - January 2013

In This Issue: - Written Contracts and the Statute of Limitations...Page 1 - Website Owners: Who is Liable for Third Party Postings on Your Website?...Page 2 - Business Tort Brings Sanctions...Page 3 -...more

Network Interference: A Legal Guide to the Commercial Risks and Rewards of the Social Media Phenomenon (2nd Edition)

In October 2009, we published the first edition of this White Paper, focusing primarily on social media issues in the United States. The response was overwhelming and far beyond our expectation — clients, friends, press and...more

Website Owners: Who Is Liable For Third Party Postings On Your Website?

A recent Fairfax County defamation case involving a consumer’s scathing postings against a contractor on Yelp and Angie’s List raises the issue as to who can be held liable for postings made by third parties. Can the...more

Most Popular Posts Of 2012

Yes, it’s the lazy way to do a post during the week before Christmas and New Year. In my next post, we will use this information to help predict the trends of legal issues for online media, marketing, internet law and...more

10 Results
|
View per page
Page: of 1