News & Analysis as of

Mootness Covenant Not to Sue

Case Summary - PPG Industries, Inc. v. Valspar Sourcing, Inc.

In a non-precedential decision, the Federal Circuit found that appellant PPG had Article III standing to file an appeal from two inter partes reexaminations. However, the Court found that appellee Valspar’s subsequent...more

In Onboard Wi-Fi Case, Covenant Not To Sue Has Wide Range

Judge Jeffrey Alker Meyer of the District of Connecticut recently released an opinion that is significant to litigants on either side of a covenant not to sue. In a complex case with a host of claims and counterclaims...more

Covenant Not to Sue Insufficient to Warrant Dismissal of Counterclaims Where Covenant Contained Reservation of Rights

The plaintiff filed a motion to dismiss the defendants' patent invalidity counterclaims for lack of subject matter jurisdiction pursuant to Fed.R.Civ.P. Rule 12(b)(1) because the plaintiff withdrew its patent infringement...more

Court Of Chancery Calculates Mootness Benefit In Post-Trulia Decision

by Morris James LLP on

This is an interesting decision for two reasons. First, the decision awards a mootness fee for disclosures and changes to deal protection measures in a merger gone bust. Thus, the opinion is useful precedent in the...more

Intellectual Property Bulletin - Winter 2013

by Fenwick & West LLP on

In This Bulletin: - Just Moot It: Supreme Court in Already v. Nike Clarifies When a Covenant Not to Sue Can Kill a Declaratory Judgment Case - Murky Waters: Post-Approval Regulatory Activities and the §...more

Intellectual Property Newsletter - January 2013

by King & Spalding on

In This Issue: *News From the Bench - Enough Already, Supreme Court Tells Petitioner in Mythology-Laced Opinion. - Divided Fed. Circuit Affirms Patentability of Claims to a 12-Can Dispenser...more

Enforcement Implications of Already, LLC v. Nike, Inc.

by Morgan Lewis on

Brand owner's broad covenant not to sue may render invalidity counterclaims moot. On January 9, the U.S. Supreme Court in Already, LLC v. Nike, Inc. held that a plaintiff trademark owner's dismissal of its infringement...more

A Covenant Not to Sue May Avoid Invalidity Claims

Last week, in Already, LLC v. Nike, Inc. (opinion attached), the Supreme Court unanimously decided that the voluntary cessation doctrine, most often used when a defendant claims its voluntary compliance moots a case where it...more

Just Moot It: Supreme Court in Already v. Nike Clarifies When a Covenant Not to Sue Can Kill a Declaratory Judgment Case

by Fenwick & West LLP on

In 2007, the Supreme Court in MedImmune v. Genentech broadened the scope of declaratory judgment jurisdiction, making it easier for parties fearing IP claims to bring defensive lawsuits. Last week, the Court made it easier...more

Supreme Court: Broad Covenant Not to Sue Negates Jurisdiction over Counterclaims for Non-Infringement and Cancellation of...

by McDermott Will & Emery on

In Already, LLC v. Nike, Inc., the Supreme Court of the United States ruled that the trademark plaintiff’s voluntary dismissal of its infringement suit, together with a covenant not to sue, deprived the district court of...more

Already v. Nike: The Supreme Court Finds Covenant Not to Sue Made Competitor’s Claim for Invalidity of Trademark Moot

by Morrison & Foerster LLP on

The U.S. Supreme Court issued its opinion yesterday in the closely-watched case, Already, LLC v. Nike, Inc. In a decision that is almost certain to affect patent owners as well, the Court unanimously affirmed the Second...more

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