Royalties Patents Supreme Court of the United States

News & Analysis as of

The Finite Life of a Patent Upheld: No Royalties After Expiration

The U.S. Supreme Court, in a 6 to 3 ruling citing stare decisis, upheld the half-century rule against royalty payments accruing after expiration of a patent. The Court’s decision in Kimble v. Marvel Entertainment, LLC is a...more

Rebuffing Critics, Supreme Court Re-Affirms Ban on Post-Expiration Patent Royalties

Fifty years ago, in Brulotte v. Thys Co., the U.S. Supreme Court held that the collection of royalties after a patent’s expiration constitutes per se patent misuse. Brulotte has been widely criticized as economically...more

Supreme Court Upholds Brulotte Rule Prohibiting Post-Expiration Patent Royalties

On June 22, 2015, the Supreme Court issued its decision in Kimble v. Marvel Entertainment, LLC, upholding the rule, first announced in Brulotte v. Thys Co., 379 U. S. 29 (1964), that an agreement allowing a patent owner to...more

The 'Super Powered' Rule of Stare Decisis Defeats Spider Man

The Supreme Court of the United States, in a 6-3 decision, left undisturbed the rule from its 51-year-old decision in Brulotte v. Thys Co. (1964), invoking stare decisis and rejecting arguments seeking to overturn the rule...more

U.S. Supreme Court Confirms That Post Patent Expiration Royalties Are Prohibited

Background of the Case - The dispute in Stephen Kimble v. Marvel Enterprises, Inc., Case No. 13-720, ___ U.S. ___ (2015), arose out of a 2001 settlement of a prior lawsuit between the parties. The prior suit had...more

Getting Tangled in the Web of a Hybrid Royalty Clause Part II: Supreme Court Re-affirms Brulotte Decision

In July of 2013, I wrote a blog post about the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeal’s decision in Kimble v. Marvel Entertainment LLC and its effect upon royalty provisions in hybrid IP license agreements. (...) By “hybrid” I am...more

Supreme Court Declines To Overrule Brulotte Rule: Post-Expiration Patent Royalties Remain Unlawful

Background - Fifty years ago, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that a patent license agreement that requires the licensee to pay royalties after the expiration of the licensed patent is unlawful per se, because such payments...more

Supreme Court Leaves Post-Patent Expiration Royalty Rule in Place

The U.S. Supreme Court today in Kimble v. Marvel Entertainment, LLC upheld the longstanding Brulotte rule that a patent owner cannot continue to receive royalties for sales made after its patent expires. In a 6-3 decision,...more

Kimble and Post-Expiration Royalties: The Next Big Thing, or Much Ado About Nothing?

Today, as we previewed here, the US Supreme Court analyzed the question of whether patent holders should be allowed to contract for royalty payments that continue to accrue after the expiration of the subject patent. While...more

The Year Ahead in Patent Law - 2015

With the advent of the America Invents Act (AIA), public perception of frivolous patent litigation, frequently surrounding cases filed by non-practicing entities (NPEs), has received increasing legislative attention. Although...more

IP Newsletter - January 2015

In This Issue: - Castle Defense: Federal Circuit Reinforces Patent Damages Gate in VirnetX - Standards Patent Licensing: Always Apportionment, Sometimes Stacking - Supreme Court to Consider Good-Faith...more

Supreme Court Corner: Q4 2014

KIMBLE V. MARVEL ENTERPRISES, INC. Patent Licensing - Cert. Pending - Issue: Whether the Supreme Court should overrule Brulotte v. Thys Co., which held “a patentee’s use of a royalty agreement that projects...more

Will the Supreme Court Remove Brulotte’s Shadow Over Patent Licensing?

Fifty years ago, in Brulotte v. Thys Co., the U.S. Supreme Court held that the collection of royalties after a patent’s expiration constitutes per se patent misuse. Although criticized by scholars, antitrust agencies, and the...more

Supreme Court 2014 Patent Preview

On average, the U.S. Supreme Court historically hears fewer than one patent case each term. For example, in the 14 years between 1982 and 1995, the Court decided only five patent cases. In the seven years between 1995 and...more

Supreme Court to Decide Whether License Agreements May Require Payment of Royalties After Patent Expiration

The U.S. Supreme Court Friday agreed to revisit a longstanding precedent that bars patent owners from collecting royalties after their patents have expired, even if those post-expiration payments represent compensation for...more

U.S. Supreme Court Holds That Patentees Bear the Burden of Proof of Infringement in DJ Actions Brought by Licensee

A patentee bears the burden of proving infringement when a licensee seeks a declaratory judgment of non-infringement, the U.S. Supreme Court has held. The ruling reversed the Federal Circuit and clarified declaratory...more

The Supreme Court: Cases to Watch in the October 2013 Term

This week marks the first Monday in October, which for Supreme Court watchers is a holiday: the start of a new term. While not everyone gets that excited about the new term, there are several cases that the Court intends to...more

Instapundit: America's IP Laws Need to be "Pruned Back"  [Video]

May 24 (Bloomberg Law) -- Under current intellectual property law, a consumer who unlocks his or her own cellphone can be convicted as a felon. Law professor and Instapundit founder Glenn Reynolds says such a scenario is...more

U.S. Supreme Court to Review Burden of Proof to Apply in Patent Licensee Challenges

In 2007, the United States Supreme Court ruled that patent licensees could challenge their obligation to pay patent license royalties under a license agreement without first breaching the license agreement by halting royalty...more

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