Supreme Court of the United States Myriad

The United States Supreme Court is the highest court of the United States and is charged with interpreting federal law, including the United States Constitution. The Court's docket is largely discretionary... more +
The United States Supreme Court is the highest court of the United States and is charged with interpreting federal law, including the United States Constitution. The Court's docket is largely discretionary with only a limited number of cases granted review each term.  The Court is comprised of one chief justice and eight associate justices, who are nominated by the President and confirmed by the Senate to hold lifetime positions. less -
News & Analysis as of

Eligibility of Isolated Nucleic Acid: Australian and U.S. Standards

This is the second of a two-part series comparing Australian and U.S. law and will focus on patent eligibility of an isolated nucleic acid sequence. Are the patent eligibility standards for isolated nucleic acid...more

Top Stories of 2015: #11 to #15

After reflecting upon the events of the past twelve months, Patent Docs presents its ninth annual list of top patent stories. For 2015, we identified twenty stories that were covered on Patent Docs last year that we believe...more

Top Stories of 2015: #16 to #20

After reflecting upon the events of the past twelve months, Patent Docs presents its ninth annual list of top patent stories. For 2015, we identified twenty stories that were covered on Patent Docs last year that we believe...more

Australian Patent Office Proposes “Coding Only” Sequence Ban

Coming soon after the High Court’s “Myriad decision” in Australia, the Australian Patent Office has proposed guidelines that would effectively limit the ban on patent-eligibility of DNA sequences to nucleic acids that code...more

Can a natural product still be patented in Australia?

Yes. While various commentaries have suggested that patentable subject matter will be restricted in Australia under the recent High Court Myriad decision to exclude naturally occurring products (whether or not isolated), my...more

Can we patent products found in nature? It's complicated. An update on Australia's Myriad decision...

It remains to be seen if this new Myriad decision in Australia will be extended as it was in the U.S. to prevent virtually any product found in nature from being patented....more

What did the Australian High Court actually say about the patent eligibility of cDNA?

As the dust from the impact of the Australian Myriad decision begins to settle, now is the time to revisit what many have said regarding patent eligibility of cDNA, against what the final appeal Court actually said. On...more

“Does a nucleic acid constitute patent eligible subject matter under Australia law?”

That is the question that we hoped Australia’s final appeal Court to have answered in the Myriad decision that it handed down last week. Some observers have been quite forthright on the point: ‘Yes, the High Court of...more

Australian High Court Rules Gene Patents Unpatentable

Like the United States Supreme Court, the High Court of Australia has determined that Myriad’s patents directed to purified and isolated DNA molecules encoding the BRCA genes are unpatentable. Indeed, the Australian Court...more

News from Abroad: Australian High Court Has Ruled in Myriad Gene Patent Case

The Australian High Court yesterday unanimously overturned six lower court judges and dismissed some very careful reasoning to not only follow the U.S. Supreme Court in invalidating claims to the BRCA1 and 2 gene sequences,...more

News from Abroad: High Court Rules Myriad's BRCA Genes Not Patentable Subject Matter in Australia

Just over one year after the Full Federal Court of Australia unanimously upheld an earlier Federal Court decision that naturally occurring nucleic acid molecules are patentable in Australia, the High Court of Australia has...more

Australia High Court Rules Against Gene Patents

Colleagues in Australia have been spreading the bad news: The High Court of Australia followed the lead (?) of the U.S. Supreme Court and determined that Myriad cannot patent the isolated BRCA1 gene in Australia. Thanks to...more

High Court of Australia determines isolated BRCA1 gene not patentable in Australia

The High Court of Australia has unanimously overturned previous decisions from lower courts and has held that certain claims to Myriad's patent for isolated BRCA1 nucleic acid molecules are not patentable in Australia...more

Strong Support for Sequenom’s Petition for Rehearing En Banc

In Ariosa Diagnostics Inc. v. Sequenom Inc., 788 F.3d 1371 (Fed. Cir. 2015), a Federal Circuit panel held that Sequenom Inc.’s prenatal diagnosis patent claims patent ineligible subject matter under the two-step test of Mayo...more

Protecting Diagnostic Innovation – Two Actor Infringement Liability

In Akamai Techs. Inc. v. Limelight Networks, Inc., (August 13, 2015 Fed. Cir.) an en banc Federal Circuit unanimously held that direct infringement under Section 271(a) can occur...more

Sequenom Seeks Rehearing En Banc

Sequenom, Inc. has filed a petition for rehearing en banc of the Federal Circuit decision that held its diagnostic method claims invalid under 35 USC § 101. (You can read my synopsis of that decision here). Stakeholders in...more

Further Guidance from the PTO

And yet diagnostic methods are still wandering in the wilderness… The PTO has issued yet another revision of its Subject Matter Eligibility Guidance for Examiners. The ?rst of these Guidance documents arrived in March...more

Myriad Throws in the Towel

In the aftermath of the Supreme Court's decision in AMP v. Myriad Genetics in 2013, Myriad (paradoxically to those either not paying attention or who over interpreted the scope of the Court's holding in its opinion) filed...more

Can Any DNA Claims Still Be Patented?

In a decision issued December 17, 2014, in In Re BRCA1- And BRCA2-Based Hereditary Cancer Test Patent Litigation (Myriad II), the Federal Circuit invalidated Myriad’s primer claims and detection method claims under 35 USC §...more

Guest Post: Myriad -- A Direct and Unexceptional Approach

Is there a chain of reasoning that leads to the outcome in Myriad more shortly and directly than that outlined by Justice Thomas and without invoking judicial exceptions? It is strongly arguable that this is indeed the case...more

The USPTO Patent Subject Matter Eligibility Guidance TRIPS Over Treaty Requirements

The “Myriad-Mayo” patent subject matter eligibility guidance issued March 4, 2014 reflects the USPTO’s interpretation of Supreme Court cases interpreting and applying 35 USC § 101 to claims involving laws of nature, natural...more

Why Are Method of Treatment Claims and Method of Manufacture Claims Subject to Scrutiny Under the USPTO Patent Subject Matter...

The USPTO has asked for written comments on its patent subject matter eligibility guidance by July 31, 2014. In this article, I discuss why therapeutic method claims and method of manufacture claims should not be subject to...more

Docs @ BIO: The Rest of the Story - Bloomberg BNA Hosts Panel on Subject Matter Eligibility

Last month at the BIO convention, Randy Kubetin, Managing Editor of Bloomberg BNA's Life Sciences Law & Industry Report moderated a panel entitled "Patent Eligibility from the Trenches: Practical Implications of the Supreme...more

Federal Circuit Dismisses WARF Stem Cell Case – A Missed Opportunity

Recently in Consumer Watchdog v. Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation, No. 2013-1377 (Fed. Cir. 2014), the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit (Federal Circuit) dismissed Appellant Consumer Watchdog’s appeal on the...more

USPTO Holds Forum on Subject Matter Eligibility -- Part II

Last Friday, the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office held a four-hour long forum to receive public feedback on the Myriad-Mayo Guidance, which was issued by the Office on March 4. According to the Office's Guidance webpage, the...more

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