Supreme Court of the United States Statute of Limitations

The United States Supreme Court is the highest court of the United States and is charged with interpreting federal law, including the United States Constitution. The Court's docket is largely discretionary... more +
The United States Supreme Court is the highest court of the United States and is charged with interpreting federal law, including the United States Constitution. The Court's docket is largely discretionary with only a limited number of cases granted review each term.  The Court is comprised of one chief justice and eight associate justices, who are nominated by the President and confirmed by the Senate to hold lifetime positions. less -
News & Analysis as of

Tibble Supreme Court Argument: Fiduciaries Must Monitor Investments

Section 413 of ERISA provides in general that no action for breach of fiduciary duty may be brought after the earlier of: (1) six years after (A) the date of the last action which constituted a part of the breach, or (B) in...more

The Truth in Lending Act and Rescission: Lessons Learned by Lenders from Jesinoski v. Countrywide

The Supreme Court just made mortgage rescission a little bit easier for borrowers and scarier for lenders in Jesinoski v. Countrywide Home Loans. Under the Truth in Lending Act, 15 U.S.C. §1601-1677 (“TILA”), mortgage lenders...more

Supreme Court Issues Significant Decision Interpreting Truth In Lending Act

In a unanimous decision issued on January 13, the Supreme Court held that a borrower exercises its right to rescind under Section 1635 of the Truth In Lending Act (TILA), simply by notifying its creditor of its intent to...more

Truth In Lending Act Requires Notice, Not Suit

In a unanimous and brief five page opinion, both rarities for the U.S. Supreme Court, the decision in Jesinoski v. Countrywide Home Loans (Docket 13-684, Jan. 13, 2015) made clear that the Federal Truth in Lending Act...more

Rescission of Home Mortgage Loans

The Truth-in-Lending Act (“Act”) was adopted in 1969. It has spawned dozens of lawsuits and hundreds of administrative rules and interpretations. Recently, the United States Supreme Court had an opportunity to address the...more

Borrowers Need Not File Suit to Rescind Mortgage Loan Under TILA, U.S. Supreme Court Holds

Why it matters - In a victory for consumers, the U.S. Supreme Court unanimously ruled that the Truth in Lending Act (TILA) does not require borrowers to file suit to rescind a mortgage loan transaction within the...more

Supreme Court Rules Written Notice Is Sufficient to Rescind under TILA

Action Item: In light of the United States Supreme Court’s decision in Jesinoski, lenders should be aware that written notice provided by the borrower, within three years of the loan consummation, is sufficient to exercise...more

Supreme Court Hears Argument On Two Procedural Issues In False Claims Act Litigation

On January 13, 2015, the United States Supreme Court heard oral argument in Kellogg Brown & Root v. United States ex rel. Carter, No. 12-1497, a False Claims Act (FCA) qui tam case involving allegations of fraudulent billing...more

Supreme Court Eases Requirements for Homeowners Rescinding Mortgages

The U.S. Supreme Court recently held in Jesinoski v. Countrywide Home Loans, Inc. that borrowers exercising their right to rescind mortgages under the Truth in Lending Act (“TILA”) only need to provide written notice to...more

No Lawsuit Required to Rescind: U.S. Supreme Court Clarifies Mortgage Rescission Notification Requirements for Borrowers under...

Background of Notice versus Lawsuit Issue - The Truth in Lending Act (“TILA”), as implemented by Regulation Z, provides borrowers with a powerful tool: the right to rescind certain mortgage loan transactions. This...more

High Court Clarifies TILA Rescission Procedure

In Jesinoski v. Countrywide Home Loans, et al. (No. 13-684), the U.S. Supreme Court has eased the process by which a borrower may seek to walk away from his home mortgages, holding that the borrower, in order to avail himself...more

Supreme Court Unanimously Resolves Circuit Split Regarding Notice Requirement for Truth in Lending Act Right of Rescission

In Jesinoski v. Countrywide Home Loans, Inc., decided January 13, 2015, the United States Supreme Court resolved a circuit split and clarified that borrowers need not file a complaint in order to invoke their right to rescind...more

The U.S. Supreme Court Unanimously Rules Against the Creditor in Jesinoski

We predicted here that at least five U.S. Supreme Court Justices would reject the creditor’s argument in Jesinoski v. Countrywide Home Loans, Inc. that a borrower must file a lawsuit within three years of the consummation of...more

Special Alert: Supreme Court Holds That Notice of Rescission Is Sufficient For Borrowers to Exercise TILA’s Extended Right to...

The Supreme Court on January 13, 2015 held in Jesinoski v. Countrywide Home Loans, Inc. that a borrower seeking to rescind a loan pursuant to the Truth In Lending Act’s (“TILA’s”) extended right of rescission need only submit...more

SCOTUS Ruling Makes it Easier for Borrowers to Rescind Home Loan Under Truth in Lending Act

On January 13, 2015, the U.S. Supreme Court unanimously ruled that borrowers may reserve and effect their right to rescission by simply notifying creditors of their intent to rescind a loan within three years after receiving...more

Supreme Court Resolves Circuit Split Over TILA Rescissions Limitations Period

The United States Supreme Court ruled yesterday that a borrower relying on the Truth in Lending Act (TILA) to rescind his mortgage loan need only mail written notice of his intent to his lender within three years of the...more

Supreme Court Decides Jesinoski v. Countrywide Home Loans, Inc.

On January 13, 2015, the U.S. Supreme Court held that borrowers exercising their right to rescind a loan under the Truth in Lending Act must provide written notice to their lender within the three-year rescission period but...more

U.S. Supreme Court to Decide ERISA Statute of Limitations Case

ERISA Section 413 generally sets forth a six year statute of limitations for bringing claims for fiduciary breach. On October 2, 2014, the Supreme Court granted certiorari in Tibble v. Edison International to decide whether a...more

Jesinoski v. Countrywide Home Loans: The U.S. Supreme Court Seems Ready to Hold that a Borrower’s Right of Rescission Under TILA...

On November 4, 2014, the U.S. Supreme Court heard argument in Jesinoski v. Countrywide Home Loans, the case that will decide whether a borrower can timely exercise the right of rescission under the Truth in Lending Act simply...more

Reasonable Fee Issues for Fiduciaries on the Horizon

The Supreme Court is poised to address whether fiduciaries' decisions—especially in using fee sharing arrangements—are subject to deference when challenged. The Eighth and Ninth Circuit courts recently decided these issues,...more

Supreme Court to Review Application of ERISA’s Six-Year Statute of Limitations in Tibble v. Edison Int’l.

On October 2, 2014, the Supreme Court of the United States granted the plaintiffs’ petition for a writ of certiorari in Tibble v. Edison International to answer “Whether a claim that [Employee Retirement Income Security Act]...more

Trade Groups Submit Brief in SCOTUS TILA Rescission Case

This week, six financial services trade associations submitted an amicus brief in Jesinoski v. Countrywide Home Loans, Inc., No. 13-684, a case pending before the U.S. Supreme Court that may resolve a circuit split over...more

Can't You Hear Me Knocking? Amending ERISA

On October 15, 2013, the United States Supreme Court issued its opinion in Heimeshoff v. Hartford Life & Accident Ins. Co., 134 S.Ct. 604 (2013). The specific question before the Court in that case, as expressly stated by...more

Supreme Court to address circuit splits on wartime tolling and first-to-file bar

The Supreme Court has agreed to hear an appeal which will likely reconcile an appellate split as to whether the Wartime Suspension of Limitations Act applies in False Claims Act cases and the first-to-file bar. ...more

Supreme Court to Take Up Kellogg Brown & Root Whistleblower Case

It’s impossible to understate the importance of strict adherence to procedure when initiating a qui tam action under the False Claims Act. Unfortunately under our legal system, otherwise meritorious claims can often be...more

117 Results
|
View per page
Page: of 5