Statute of Limitations Supreme Court of the United States

Statute of Limitations refers to a statute that sets the time period during which a legal claim can be brought. Most statute of limitations laws require individuals to sue at some point during a set period... more +
Statute of Limitations refers to a statute that sets the time period during which a legal claim can be brought. Most statute of limitations laws require individuals to sue at some point during a set period usually commencing from the date of the wrong or injury or the discovery of the wrong or injury. Except for under a limited set of circumstances, if an individual does not file a suit within the specified time period, the law bars them from ever suing on that claim. less -
News & Analysis as of

Supreme Court 2015-2016 Intellectual Property Case Review

At the end of June, the U.S. Supreme Court’s October 2015 term came to a close. The Court issued written decisions in three intellectual property cases during that term, the same number of cases as during the previous term,...more

California Employment Law Notes - July 2016

Employer Is Entitled To Recover $4 Million In Attorney's Fees From EEOC - CRST Van Expedited, Inc. v. EEOC, 578 U.S. ___, 136 S. Ct. 1642 (2016) - The EEOC filed suit against CRST (a trucking company) alleging...more

A Review of the Supreme Court’s 2015 - 2016 Term

Last week, the Supreme Court ended its 2015-2016 session under a cloud of uncertainty. On February 22, 2016, Justice Antonin Scalia, the stalwart of the Court’s conservative wing for 30 years, passed away. Justice Scalia’s...more

U.S. Supreme Court Provides Clarity On Statute Of Limitations In Constructive Discharge Title VII Cases

In a ruling on May 23, 2016, the United States Supreme Court provided much needed clarity on an issue that had caused a split among federal Circuit courts: when is a claim for constructive discharge under Title VII filed too...more

MoFo New York Tax Insights - Volume 7, Issue 6

New York City Tribunal Rejects City’s Attempt To Forcibly Combine Bank And Its Mortgage Subsidiary - The New York City Tax Appeals Tribunal, affirming a determination of the Chief Administrative Law Judge, has held that...more

Expanding the Timer: Supreme Court Gives Employees More Time to File Claims

They say that timing is everything — or at least now it is for so-called “constructive discharge” claims. Last month, the United States Supreme Court, in a 7-1 decision, solidified the rule that the time within which an...more

Employment Practices Newsletter - June 2016

EEOC Issues Final Regulations on Wellness Programs - It seems to be a win-win when employers who provide employees with incentives to encourage healthy behavior. But employers that do so must contend with an alphabet...more

Tick-Tock Goes the Clock: SCOTUS Clarifies the Statute of Limitations in Constructive Discharge Actions

On May 23, 2016, the United States Supreme Court issued its opinion in Green v. Brennan, Postmaster General, in which the Court gave aggrieved employees in workplace discrimination cases more time to file complaints against...more

Supreme Court Says Limitations Period for Discrimination Claims Runs Beginning on Date of Constructive Discharge

Title VII and related federal civil rights laws contain short administrative claims periods that often result in preclusion of actions filed after expiration of these dates. These exclusions lead to frequent litigation...more

U.S. Supreme Court Holds that Resignation Triggers the Limitations Period for Constructive Discharge Claims

The United States Supreme Court resolved a split among appellate circuits about when an employee must take action to pursue a constructive discharge claim. The Court held that the 45-day limitation period for a federal civil...more

Spring Forward: Constructive Discharge Clock Doesn’t Start Until Employee Gives “Definite Notice” of Intent to Resign

On May 23, 2016, the Supreme Court resolved a circuit split over the deadline for employees to pursue their administrative remedies in connection with constructive discharge claims under Title VII. Generally, employees must...more

Resignation Date Starts the Statute of Limitations Clock In Constructive Discharge Cases, Supreme Court Holds

On Monday, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the statute of limitations for purposes of filing a claim alleging constructive discharge begins to run on the date that the employee resigns, as opposed to the last discriminatory...more

SCOTUS Aligns Application of Statute of Limitations in Constructive Discharge and Actual Discharge Cases

The U.S. Supreme Court held in Green v. Brennan that the statute of limitations for a constructive discharge begins to run on the date of resignation, not the date of the employer’s last discriminatory act, resolving a...more

Supreme Court: Constructive Discharge Limitations Period Begins with Notice of Resignation

The U.S. Supreme Court has ruled that the statute of limitations for an employee’s Title VII constructive discharge claim begins on the date of the employee’s notice of resignation. Green v. Brennan, No. 14-613 (May 23,...more

Supreme Court clarifies beginning of filing period for claims of constructive discharge under Title VII

On May 23, 2016, the US Supreme Court resolved the circuit split over when the filing period begins for a claim of constructive discharge under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. The Court held the period begins when...more

Supreme Court Rules that Statute of Limitations Period for Constructive Discharge Claims Begins to Run from Date of Notice of...

The U.S. Supreme Court recently held that the statute of limitations period for constructive discharge claims under Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act (Title VII) begins to run from the date that the employee gives the...more

Supreme Court Clarifies the Time Period for Initiating Constructive Discharge Claims

On May 23, 2016, the United States Supreme Court issued its decision in Green v. Brennan, holding that the statute of limitations for a constructive discharge claim begins to run at the time the employee resigns. While the...more

SCOTUS Gives Boost To Employee Constructive Discharge Claims

In a 7-1 decision, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled today that the statute of limitations for Title VII constructive discharge claim begins on the date of the employee’s notice of resignation, not on the date of the last alleged...more

Resignation triggers clock start for filing constructive discharge claims

Federal law requires a governmental employee to file a constructive discharge claim with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission within 45 days of the “matter alleged to be discriminatory.” The vagueness of that phrase...more

SCOTUS Gives Plaintiffs Second Apple

Today the U.S. Supreme Court gave would-be plaintiffs not just a second bite at the apple, but an entirely new apple when it comes to Title VII limitations periods. Green v. Brennan. The Court held today that Title VII’s...more

Supreme Court Decides Green v. Brennan

On May 23, 2016, the Supreme Court of the United States decided Green v. Brennan, No. 14-613, holding that a constructive-discharge claim accrues — and the limitations period begins to run — when the employee gives notice of...more

Supreme Court: Constructive Discharge Limitations Period Starts When Employee Resigns

The Supreme Court ruled, on May 23, 2016, that for employees alleging that they were “constructively discharged” from their employment (as opposed to terminated by their employer), the statute of limitations begins to run...more

SCOTUS Rules: Notice of Resignation Starts the Clock in a Federal Employee’s Constructive Discharge Case

On May 23, 2016, the Supreme Court of the United States decided when the limitations period for filing a lawsuit begins to run for a federal employee claiming he or she resigned—or was “constructively discharged”—due to...more

Cheerleaders and Laches

Monday the U.S. Supreme Court agreed to hear cases on patent laches, SCA Hygiene Products Aktiebolag et al. v. First Quality Baby Products, LLC et al., and copyright protection for clothing, Star Athletica, LLC v. Varsity...more

Supreme Court Continues Focus on IP

Here we go again: The United States Supreme Court today decided to review two more intellectual property cases. That makes three IP cases so far for next Term (which begins this October), already equaling the number of IP...more

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