News & Analysis as of

More Biotech and Diagnostic Patents At Risk After Federal Circuit Decision

On December 17, 2014, the Federal Circuit Court of Appeals found that certain claims relating to Myriad’s BRCA1 genetic test for breast and ovarian cancer were invalid under 35 U.S.C. § 101 as being ineligible for patent...more

Myriad Disappointments for Biotech, but Hope Remains

CAFC extends the reach of subject-matter ineligibility under Myriad - Following Myriad Genetic’s 2013 loss at the Supreme Court (Ass’n for Molecular Pathology v. Myriad Genetics, 133 S. Ct. 2107 (2013), herein “Myriad...more

Patent Update for IT and Biotech Companies: New Pieces to the Patent Puzzle

In This Presentation: - PATENT ELIGIBLE SUBJECT MATTER: LIFE IN SOFTWARE/IT AFTER ALICE CORPORATION V. CLS BANK (AND OTHER RECENT 101 DECISIONS) - A Brief History with respect to Software and Biz...more

BIO IPCC Panel Discusses Impact of Myriad-Mayo Guidance

Yesterday, we reported on a session of the Biotechnology Industry Organization (BIO) Intellectual Property Counsel's Committee fall conference, which took place earlier this week in Nashville, TN, in which the U.S. Patent and...more

USPTO Provides Update on Status of Revised Myriad-Mayo Guidance

During a session of the Biotechnology Industry Organization (BIO) Intellectual Property Counsels Committee (IPCC) fall conference, which took place this week in Nashville, TN, the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office provided a...more

Examination of Myriad-Mayo Guidance Comments -- BIO Joint Comment

On March 4, the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office issued a guidance memorandum, entitled "Guidance For Determining Subject Matter Eligibility Of Claims Reciting Or Involving Laws of Nature, Natural Phenomena, & Natural...more

Sherry Knowles Addresses Real World Impact of Myriad-Mayo Guidance at BIO Symposium

Last month, at the Biotechnology Industry Organization (BIO) IP & Diagnostics Symposium in Alexandria, VA, Sherry Knowles of Knowles IP Strategies addressed the impact of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office's Myriad-Mayo...more

Full Federal Court confirms isolated nucleic acids are patentable in Australia

• The Full Federal Court has unanimously confirmed that isolated nucleic acids, either DNA or RNA, are patentable in Australia. • The decision is in contrast to the recent decision of the US Supreme Court, which held a...more

Update on Mayo Myriad Patent Eligibility From USPTO BCP Partnership Meeting

On September 17, 2015, the USPTO held the first “bicoastal” Biotechnology/Chemical/Pharmaceutical Customer Partnership meeting, with live participation from the USPTO’s main campus in Alexandria, VA and from San Jose...more

Examination of Myriad-Mayo Guidance Comments -- International Bioindustry Associations

On March 4, the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office issued a guidance memorandum, entitled "Guidance For Determining Subject Matter Eligibility Of Claims Reciting Or Involving Laws of Nature, Natural Phenomena, & Natural...more

Examination of Myriad-Mayo Guidance Comments -- ACLU

On March 4, the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office issued a guidance memorandum entitled "Guidance For Determining Subject Matter Eligibility Of Claims Reciting Or Involving Laws of Nature, Natural Phenomena, & Natural...more

Docs @ BIO: BNA Issues Report on PTO's Patent Eligibility Guidance

Sounding an appropriately alarmist note, the Bureau of National Affairs (BNA) Life Sciences Law and Industry Report issues the results of a study on how the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office is administering its March 4, 2014...more

Myriad - One Year Later

The Supreme Court decision last year on June 13, 2013 in Association of Molecular Pathology v. Myriad Genetics may have been a watershed moment for the biotechnology industry. So far the effects have been hard to detect, but...more

USPTO Tries to Address Public Misunderstandings Regarding Myriad-Mayo Guidance

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office spent the entire afternoon session of today's biotechnology/chemical/pharmaceutical (BCP) customer partnership meeting focusing on the guidance memorandum for determining the subject...more

Five Things You Should Know About the USPTO Patent Subject Matter Eligibility Guidelines

The new USPTO patent subject matter eligibility guidelines set forth a detailed analytical framework for evaluating whether claims satisfy the patent subject matter eligibility requirement of 35 USC § 101. If you are an...more

California Court Holds Diagnostic Claims Not Patent-Eligible

In one of the first district court decisions applying the U.S. Supreme Court’s new Myriad patent-eligibility standard, the Northern District of California held that diagnostic claims containing only conventional and existing...more

23andMe Patent Creates Controversy

A patent issued to 23andMe, Inc. last month has created some controversy, and in response, the biotech company, based in Mountain View, California, has posted its side of the story on the 23andMe blog. The patent, U.S....more

Objects Clause And Exclusion From Patentability – Are Biotech Related Patents Under Attack In Australia?

The Australian Patent Office has released a consultation paper which seeks public comment on the proposed amendments to the Australian Patents Act 1990 (‘the Act’) to introduce an object clause and a patentability exclusion...more

Update on WARF Stem Cell Patent Challenge

As reported in my July 8, 2013 post, Consumer Watchdog (formerly known as The Foundation for Taxpayer and Consumer Rights) and the Public Patent Foundation (collectively “CW”) asked the Federal Circuit to determine if in...more

Intellectual Property and Technology News | Issue 4, Q3 2013 (Global)

In This Issue: - IPT INSIGHTS - INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY AND SPORT – A WINNING COMBINATION... - THE CJEU GOES TO THE MOVIES: REFLECTIONS ON FILM COPYRIGHT FROM AUSTRIA, THE NETHERLANDS AND THE UK - CLOUD...more

Post-Myriad Strategies for Claiming Biotech Inventions in the United States

The United States Supreme Court recently ruled that genes or other naturally-occurring pieces of DNA are patent ineligible subject matter in Association for Molecular Pathology, et al. v. Myriad Genetics, Inc., et al. No....more

After Myriad: A Herd of Elephants in the Room

As we all know by now, the Supreme Court last month decided that isolated genes are not eligible for patenting. Although seemingly drawing a clear-cut distinction between DNA molecules having the same sequence as that which...more

Myriad: Comparing US Law with European, Japanese and Australian Law

The decision by the U.S. Supreme Court that isolated DNA having the same sequence as naturally-occurring DNA is not patentable subject matter is inconsistent with the position of the European Patent Office and Japanese law....more

Supreme Court Rules on Patentability of Human Genes

Today the U.S. Supreme Court answered the question "Are human genes patentable?" The Court, in Association of Molecular Pathology et al. v. Myriad Genetics, Inc. et al., ruled that isolated DNA is a product of nature and not...more

Patent Watch: Ass'n for Molecular Pathology v. Myriad Genetics, Inc.

A naturally occurring DNA segment is a product of nature and not patent eligible merely because it has been isolated, but cDNA is patent eligible because it is not naturally occurring....more

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