News & Analysis as of

"Business Cases in the US Supreme Court"

The U.S. Supreme Court recently closed its 2012 term with its usual headline-grabbing flurry of June decisions. Several of those decisions, as well as many more that received less publicity, will affect business interests. In...more

Invalidity Counterclaims in IP Litigation: Supreme Court Rules on Effect of Covenants Not to Sue

On January 9, 2013, the Supreme Court issued its opinion in Already, LLC v. Nike, Inc., holding that a broad covenant not to enforce a trademark against certain products of a competitor moots the competitor’s action to...more

Intellectual Property Newsletter - January 2013

In This Issue: *News From the Bench - Enough Already, Supreme Court Tells Petitioner in Mythology-Laced Opinion. - Divided Fed. Circuit Affirms Patentability of Claims to a 12-Can Dispenser...more

Enforcement Implications of Already, LLC v. Nike, Inc.

Brand owner's broad covenant not to sue may render invalidity counterclaims moot. On January 9, the U.S. Supreme Court in Already, LLC v. Nike, Inc. held that a plaintiff trademark owner's dismissal of its infringement...more

Skadden's 2013 Insights: Global Litigation

New legal ground is expected to be broken this year in areas of importance to companies and their directors, officers and executives. We see those developments coming from around the globe and defining the litigation...more

A Covenant Not to Sue May Avoid Invalidity Claims

Last week, in Already, LLC v. Nike, Inc. (opinion attached), the Supreme Court unanimously decided that the voluntary cessation doctrine, most often used when a defendant claims its voluntary compliance moots a case where it...more

If You Don’t Want Your Registration Cancelled, Grant Your Opponent a Covenant Not to Sue

The United States Supreme Court, which rarely gets involved in trademark cases, has ruled that when a Defendant in a Trademark infringement case countersues to cancel the Plaintiff’s registration, the Plaintiff can divest a...more

Just Moot It: Supreme Court in Already v. Nike Clarifies When a Covenant Not to Sue Can Kill a Declaratory Judgment Case

In 2007, the Supreme Court in MedImmune v. Genentech broadened the scope of declaratory judgment jurisdiction, making it easier for parties fearing IP claims to bring defensive lawsuits. Last week, the Court made it easier...more

Supreme Court: Broad Covenant Not to Sue Negates Jurisdiction over Counterclaims for Non-Infringement and Cancellation of...

In Already, LLC v. Nike, Inc., the Supreme Court of the United States ruled that the trademark plaintiff’s voluntary dismissal of its infringement suit, together with a covenant not to sue, deprived the district court of...more

Already v. Nike: The Supreme Court Finds Covenant Not to Sue Made Competitor’s Claim for Invalidity of Trademark Moot

The U.S. Supreme Court issued its opinion yesterday in the closely-watched case, Already, LLC v. Nike, Inc. In a decision that is almost certain to affect patent owners as well, the Court unanimously affirmed the Second...more

Supreme Court Holds Covenant Not to Sue Moots Counterclaim for Invalidity

In a unanimous decision issued in Already, LLC d/b/a/ Yums v. Nike (No. 11-982, January 9, 2013), the Supreme Court held that a plaintiff’s dismissal of a trademark infringement case, combined with a broad covenant not to...more

Nike’s Successful Retreat Strategy: Trademark Defendant’s Invalidity Counterclaim Is Moot Following Plaintiff’s Covenant Not to...

Nike, having sued competitor Already LLC for infringing its marks, later issued a covenant not to sue to Already and sought to dismiss the case. Defendant Already, however, had filed a counterclaim seeking a declaration that...more

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