Octane Fitness v. ICON

News & Analysis as of

Supreme Court to Review Federal Circuit Standard for Treble Damage Awards Under § 284 - Halo Electronics, Inc. v. Pulse...

Taking its first IP cases of the current session, the Supreme Court has granted certiorari in two § 284 enhanced fee award patent cases: Halo Electronics, Inc. v. Pulse Electronics, Inc., S.Ct. No. 14-1513 (Oct. 19, 2015) and...more

Supreme Court Will Decide Whether to Relax the Standard for Award of Enhanced Patent Damages

The U.S. Supreme Court announced last week that it will decide two cases concerning the issue of when district courts may award enhanced damages to patentees upon a finding of infringement. Stryker Corp. v. Zimmer, U.S., No....more

Supreme Court To Review Federal Circuit Test for Willful Patent Infringement

The U.S. Supreme Court will review the Federal Circuit’s test for determining willful patent infringement at the request of two patent holders that assert that the two-part test is too rigid and conflicts with the recent...more

SCOTUS to Hear a Duo on Willful Patent Infringement

On Monday, October 19, 2015, the U.S. Supreme Court granted certiorari to hear two patent infringement cases on the issue of willfulness. The first case is Stryker Corp. v. Zimmer Inc. and the second one is Halo Elecs., Inc....more

The Supreme Court to Review Enhanced Damages -- Octane Revisited, or Something Entirely Different?

On October 19, 2015, the Supreme Court granted certiorari in two related cases: Halo Electronics, Inc. v. Pulse Electronics, Inc. (Supreme Court docket number 14-1513) and Stryker Corp. v. Zimmer, Inc. (Supreme Court docket...more

[Webinar] Making Them Pay: Winning Attorney Fees in Patent Litigation - Oct. 8th, 12:00pm EDT

In most litigation, each party pays its own attorney fees and costs, regardless of the outcome of the case. The Patent Act of 1952, however, allowed for an award of fees to the prevailing party in patent litigation in...more

Fruitful Harvest of Attorneys’ Fees and Sanctions for Farmville Creator Zynga

Order Granting Motion for Attorneys’ Fees: Granting Motion in Part for Sanctions, Segan LLC v. Zynga Inc., Case No. 14-cv-01315-VC (Judge Vince Chhabria) - We previously reported on the Segan v. Zynga case when Judge...more

IP Newsflash - September 2015

DISTRICT COURT CASES - Minnesota Court Awards Octane Fitness $1.7 Million in Attorney Fees and Costs - In the seminal case establishing a lower standard for attorney fees in “exceptional” patent cases—Octane Fitness...more

Court Orders Patent Troll to Pay Fees under Octane Fitness

On August 18, we posted about the Supreme Court’s Octane Fitness ruling and the potential consequences the case may have on the future of patent litigation. It appears at least one New York federal judge followed the Supreme...more

Filing Serial Lawsuits for Nuisance Settlements May Be “Exceptional” if Improper Intent Established - SFA Systems, LLC v. Newegg,...

In considering a district court’s denial of attorneys’ fees in view of the Supreme Court’s Octane Fitness standard for finding an “exceptional case” under 35 U.S.C. § 285 (IP Update Vol. 17, No. 5), the U.S. Court of Appeals...more

Court Orders Fee Award for Defendants in Patent Case, Using New Octane Fitness Standard

On August 19, Chief Judge Petrese Tucker of the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania issued an opinion awarding more than $6.5 million in attorneys’ fees to two defendant corporations who prevailed at...more

IP Newsflash - August 2015 #3

DISTRICT COURT CASES - Attorney’s Fees Awarded Against Plaintiff for Inadequate Pre-Filing Investigation and Meritless Post-Discovery Positions - A judge in the U.S. District Court for the Central District of...more

Attorneys' Fees May be Easier to Obtain in Lanham Act Cases Post-Octane Fitness

Intellectual property litigation is expensive for both the plaintiff and defendant. However, because defendants are required to defend themselves in a lawsuit—in comparison to a plaintiff who has the choice to file and...more

Supreme Court Ruling Encourages Courts to Award Attorney's Fees

Have you ever wished you could make the abusive party on the other side of your patent suit pay for your attorney's fees? The U.S. Supreme Court has made your wish a reality. Recent U.S. Supreme Court precedent has made it...more

Poor Litigation Conduct by Prevailing Party Not Enough to Obviate Exceptional-Case Doctrine - Gaymar Indus., Inc. v. Cincinnati...

Addressing the degree to which litigation conduct can preclude the recovery of fees under 35 U.S. C. § 285, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit vacated the denial of a fee award, finding that sloppy litigation...more

Octane Fitness Changed the Standard for Attorney’s Fee Award, but Has Anything Changed?

It’s no secret, lawsuits can be expensive. That’s why parties frequently consider the availability of recovering attorney’s fees when deciding whether to pursue (or defend) a lawsuit. While attorney’s fees have been available...more

An Overview, A Summary And An Update To The Latest Patent Reform

Just four years ago in 2011, President Obama signed the America Invents Act (AIA) into law. Since the enactment of the AIA, there has continued to be steady pressure for further reform. In 2013, the Innovation Act was...more

Trademark Review | May 2015

Attorneys’ Fees Might be More Readily Granted in Trademark Cases - Last year, the U.S. Supreme Court relaxed the standard for awarding attorneys’ fees to the prevailing party in patent infringement cases. Octane...more

Advertising Law - May 2015 #4

SPECIAL FOCUS: The Impact of the Supreme Court’s Octane Fitness Decision on Lanham Act Litigation - For the second time in recent years, a Supreme Court decision in a patent case is having a major impact on Lanham Act...more

The PATENT Act in Its Infancy

The Senate Judiciary Committee members introduced the bipartisan Protecting American Talent and Entrepreneurship Act of 2015 (the PATENT Act) on April 29, 2015, aimed at curbing abusive patent practices and litigation. The...more

U.S. Supreme Court: Belief in Patent's Invalidity Not a Defense to Induced Infringement

In a 6-2 decision, the U.S. Supreme Court held that a defendant’s good-faith belief in the invalidity of a patent is not a defense to a claim for inducing infringement of the patent.  Under 35 U.S.C. § 271(b), “[w]hoever...more

April Court Decision Round-Up

Note: Beginning this month, IP Law Tracker will highlight significant intellectual property decisions from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit and the U.S. District Courts for the Eastern District of Michigan and...more

Federal Circuit Acknowledges § 284 Review Issue May Be Raised by Octane/Highmark Cases - Stryker Corp. v. Zimmer, Inc.

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit issued a revised opinion in Stryker Corp. v. Zimmer, Inc. In the revised opinion the Court added a footnote discussing the implications of recent Supreme Court jurisprudence...more

The Fact That an Argument Is a Loser Is Not Enough to Make It Stand Out in a Crowd

Order Denying Defendant’s Motions for Sanctions and Attorney Fees, Kreative Power, LLC, v. Monoprice, Inc., Case No. 14-cv-02991-SI (Judge Susan Illston) - Little more than a year has passed since the Supreme Court...more

LevelUp’s Pursuit of Attorney’s Fees Goes Up to the Federal Circuit Level

In an interesting case before Judge Timothy S. Hillman in the District of Massachusetts, a dispute over whether attorney’s fees should be granted is moving up to the Federal Circuit. The case brings back before the Federal...more

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