Rule-of-Reason Analysis

News & Analysis as of

ANDA Update - October 2015

Federal Circuit Interprets Statutory Requirements for Biosimilar Regulatory Pathway - Amgen Inc., v. Sandoz Inc., (Fed. Cir. July 21, 2015): In a case of first impression, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal...more

Ninth Circuit Holds That NCAA’s Amateurism Rules Violate Section 1 of the Sherman Act

In a decision handed down on September 30th, the Ninth Circuit affirmed in part and reversed in part the District Court’s ruling that the NCAA’s “amateurism” rules unlawfully restrained trade in the market for certain...more

No Cash Compensation for Class of Amateur Student Athletes

In a class action brought under the Sherman Antitrust Act, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals held that the NCAA eligibility regulations are subject to antitrust scrutiny. Applying the so-called Rule of Reason, the court held...more

The Lessons (and Wisdom) of Rihanna

Everyone these days seems to think they are entitled to more money, from the United States Department of Labor (DOL) claiming that there really are no independent contractors to the thousands of United Automobile Workers...more

Ninth Circuit Rules in O’Bannon Case that Some of the NCAA Compensation Rules are Unlawful Restraints of Trade

On September 30, 2015, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals affirmed, in part, a district court’s ruling that some of the National Collegiate Athletic Association’s (NCAA) compensation rules were unlawful restraints on trade in...more

O’Bannon v. NCAA - USCA, Ninth Circuit, September 30, 2015

Ninth Circuit affirms in part and reverses in part district court’s judgment that NCAA rule on student-athlete compensation was unlawful restraint on trade, holding that member schools were permitted to raise cap on...more

Petitioner Wins Uncontested Alice Fight - Netsirv v. Boxbee, Inc.

In a decision to institute post-grant review, the Patent Trial and Appeal Board (PTAB or Board) clarified the importance of corroboration to establish the credibility of testimony relating to prior public use in a post grant...more

The NCAA Ruling : How Far Should Courts Go In Redefining Market Rules?

In O’Bannon v. National Collegiate Athletic Association, Case No. 14-16601 (9th Cir. Sept. 30, 2015), the Ninth Circuit applied the Rule of Reason to the NCAA’s amateurism rules, and concluded that while the NCAA can ban cash...more

Ninth Circuit Disallows Additional Compensation for College Athletes

Yesterday, the Ninth Circuit ruled in the long awaited O’Bannon v. NCAA case, which challenged NCAA rules that bar student-athletes from “being paid for the use of their names, images, and likenesses” (NILs) – part of the...more

Federal Appeals Court Rejects Payments To College Athletes

This morning, the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that the NCAA is subject to antitrust laws and that its payment rules are too restrictive in attempting to maintain amateurism. However, in what can only be deemed a...more

"Shifting Burdens: Structuring a Rule of Reason in Reverse-Payment Cases"

The U.S. Supreme Court’s 2013 decision in Federal Trade Commission v. Actavis, Inc. triggered a flurry of judicial activity in relation to pharmaceutical patent settlements allegedly involving reverse payments from patent...more

Federal Trade Commission Issues First-Ever Guidance on “Unfair Methods of Competition”

Section 5 of the 1914 Federal Trade Commission Act declares that “unfair methods of competition in or affecting commerce” are unlawful. The Act also empowers the Commission to prevent persons, partnerships, and corporations...more

Key Take-Aways From the FTC’s New Section 5 Statement

The Federal Trade Commission’s New Section 5 Statement Preserves the Agency’s “Doctrinal Flexibility” but Fails to Provide Meaningful Concrete Guidance - On August 13, 2015, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) released...more

"After Long Debate, FTC Issues Only General Principles Regarding Section 5"

On August 13, 2015, the U.S. Federal Trade Commission (FTC) issued formal guidance on Section 5 enforcement consisting of a general statement of principles1 to guide application of its authority to challenge “unfair methods...more

FTC Releases Section 5 Guidelines

On Thursday, August 13, 2015, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) released a Statement of Enforcement Principles Regarding “Unfair Methods of Competition” Under Section 5 of the FTC Act. The statement was passed by a 4–1 vote,...more

FTC Puts "Standalone" Section 5 Enforcement Approach on the Record

For the first time in its 101-year history, the Federal Trade Commission recently issued a policy statement outlining the extent of its authority to police "unfair methods of competition" on a "standalone" basis under Section...more

Sowing Uncertainty: Navigating Patent Disputes and Antitrust Scrutiny Post King Drug

On June 26, 2015, the Third Circuit issued an opinion in King Drug Co. of Florence, Inc. v. Smithkline Beecham Corp., (Case No. 14-1243). King Drug. The opinion, which already has been extensively commented on and...more

Antitrust Attack on NFL's LA Moves Faces Long Odds

Greenberg Glusker partner Ricardo Cestero was quoted in a story that ran in Law360 on July 21st about the National Football League’s proposed plan to move the San Diego Chargers to Los Angeles. Fans of the Chargers urged the...more

First Federal Appellate Court Holds a NonCash Reverse Payment Subject to Antitrust Scrutiny: Is the Third Circuit's Decision in...

Recently, the Third Circuit issued the first federal appellate decision interpreting the Supreme Court's landmark decision in FTC v. Actavis, Inc.[1], potentially greatly expanding the scope of settling parties in reverse...more

Second Circuit Continues the Ebook Saga by Affirming Apple’s Role in an Unlawful Price Fixing Conspiracy

On June 30, 2015, the same day as the launch of Apple’s new streaming music service, the Second Circuit Court of Appeals coincidentally affirmed a district court ruling that Apple conspired with five of the country’s largest...more

King Drug Co. of Florence, Inc. v. SmithKline Beecham Corp. (3rd Cir. 2015)

Ever since the Supreme Court's decision in FTC v. Actavis in 2013, courts (predominantly district courts) have grappled with the scope of the decision. It was evident that the presence of a large cash payment from the...more

U.S. Supreme Court Preserves 50-Year-Old Rule Barring Post-Patent Royalties

On Monday, June 22, 2015, the U.S. Supreme Court issued a 6-3 decision in Kimble v. Marvel Entertainment, declining to reverse longstanding, yet controversial, precedent holding post-patent term royalties to be unlawful per...more

Procaps, Carlton Fields Getting Thoroughly Embarrassed in Antitrust Litigation vs. Patheon, Morgan Lewis

Anybody who litigates antitrust cases should pay attention to Procaps v. Patheon, currently pending in the Southern District of Florida. It’s a debacle. Procaps is getting crushed. Morgan Lewis is running circles around...more

Wholesale Grocery Products Case Raises Questions About How and When to Apply Per Se Rule and Rule of Reason

The Supreme Court recently denied review in In re: Wholesale Grocery Products Antitrust Litigation, an action that came up from the District of Minnesota and the Eighth Circuit. Substantively, the case is a useful reminder...more

Locke Lord QuickStudy: Filling in Some Actavis Gaps - California Supreme Court Adopts Structured Rule of Reason Test for Antitrust...

A sweeping new opinion from the California Supreme Court revives California Cartwright Act challenges to pay-for-delay pharmaceutical patent settlements. In re Cipro Cases I & II, (Case No. S198616, Slip Op. May 7, 2015). A...more

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