Patent-Eligible Subject Matter Mayo v. Prometheus

Patent-Eligible Subject Matter refers to the types of inventions that can be legally patented. The criteria for patentability varies depending on the jurisdiction. In the United States, for instance, if a... more +
Patent-Eligible Subject Matter refers to the types of inventions that can be legally patented. The criteria for patentability varies depending on the jurisdiction. In the United States, for instance, if a researcher discovers a naturally occurring substance, the substance itself cannot be patented. This issue was examined in a United States Supreme Court case, AMP v. Myriad, in regard to the patentability of human genes.  less -
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Help Wanted: Supreme Court Looking for Expert to Fill In The Right Words for Patent Eligibility Test

There's a new job opening at the Supreme Court: Job Description: Complete test of patent eligiblity sketched out by this Court’s decisions in Bilski v. Kappos and Mayo v. Prometheus. Self starter required: must be...more

USPTO Issues New Guidelines for Determining Subject Matter Eligibility Of Claims Reciting Or Involving Laws of Nature, Natural...

On March 4, 2014, the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) issued final guidance to the Examining Corps regarding patent eligibility of claims involving laws of nature, natural phenomena and natural products. The...more

Thoughts on the USPTO's Patent Eligibility Guidelines (and What to Do About Them)

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office recently issued (without public notice or opportunity to comment) its interpretation of the standards for subject matter eligibility in view of the Supreme Court's recent decisions in Mayo...more

USPTO Issues New Subject Matter Eligibility Examination Guidelines for Claims Involving Laws of Nature, Natural Principles,...

On March 4, 2014, the USPTO issued a Guidance memorandum for examination of subject matter eligibility under 35 U.S.C. § 101 in view of AMP v. Myriad (2013) and Mayo v. Prometheus (2012). Under the new guidelines, the...more

United States Patent and Trademark Office issues guidance in the wake of Myriad and Prometheus decisions

On March 4th, the United States Patent and Trademark Office issued formal guidelines for the determination of patent-eligible subject matter in the wake of two recent U.S. Supreme Court cases: Association for Molecular...more

The USPTO Announces New Guidelines for Determining Subject Matter Eligibility Under 35 U.S.C. §101 in View of Myriad, Prometheus...

March 10, 2014 – On March 4, 2014, the United States Patent & Trademark Office issued guidelines for the examination of “all claims (i.e., machine, composition, manufacture and process claims) reciting or involving laws of...more

USPTO Guidance for Examiners Takes Expansive View of Myriad and Prometheus Decisions

On March 4, 2014, the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (“USPTO”) issued a memorandum to the Patent Examining Corps with guidance for determining the patent eligibility of claims relating to products of nature and laws of...more

USPTO Issues New Patent Subject Matter Eligibility Guidelines

The USPTO has issued new patent subject matter eligibility guidelines to aid examiners in applying the principles of Myriad and Prometheus to any claim “reciting or involving laws of nature/natural principles, natural...more

USPTO Issues Guidance for Analyzing Subject Matter Eligibility of Claims Reciting Laws of Nature/Natural Principles, Natural...

Earlier today, in a memorandum issued to the Patent Examining Corps by Deputy Commissioner for Patent Examination Policy Andrew Hirshfeld, the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office implemented a new procedure for determining the...more

Sequenom Files Opening Brief in Appeal of Summary Judgment on Section 101 Grounds

Earlier this week, Sequenom, Inc. filed its opening brief in Ariosa Diagnostics, Inc. v. Sequenom, Inc., appealing summary judgment that its licensed claims to a genetic diagnostic method for detecting fetal diseases and...more

SmartGene, Inc. v. Advanced Biological Laboratories, SA (Fed. Cir. 2014)

While non-precedential, this recent Federal Circuit decision further illustrates the Court's thinking with regard to the patent-eligibility of computer-implemented inventions under 35 U.S.C. § 101, and provides a reminder...more

Salient Lessons For Australian Applicants Of US Diagnostic Patent Applications

In the latest decision concerning diagnostic method claims a US Court1 has provided some guidance to the diagnostics industry on the interpretation of the recent Supreme Court decisions in Mayo v Prometheus2 (Mayo) and AMP v....more

Defendants' Response to Myriad's Preliminary Injunction Motions - Myriad Genetics v. Ambry Genetics Corp. and Myriad Genetics v....

Last month, Ambry Genetics and Gene By Gene responded to Myriad's motion for preliminary injunction in a 109 page brief that sets out its invalidity case as well as the basis for its antitrust counterclaims. Supported by...more

MBHB Snippets: Review of Developments in Intellectual Property Law - Volume 11, Issue 3 (Summer 2013): Not Just a Flook?:...

On May 10, 2013, the Federal Circuit handed down the much-anticipated en banc decision in CLS Bank Int'l v. Alice Corp. This case is perhaps the most important 35 U.S.C. § 101 jurisprudence regarding the patent eligibility of...more

Gene patents and the future of commercialized technology

Medicine is evolving from a global, one-size-fits-all approach to a more individualized approach that tailors treatment specifically for each patient. Originally published in The Journal Record - August 8, 2013....more

Intellectual Property Bulletin - Spring 2013: Federal Circuit Undecided About Whether Software is Patentable?

Patent holders, inventors, and even the courts have recently struggled with the limits of what can be patented. The patentability of software, widely accepted for decades, has lately been questioned. The scope of...more

The Supreme Court's Myriad Decision: Where Does It Leave the "Inventive Concept" Test?

Perhaps one of the most intriguing issues coming out of the Supreme Court's Myriad decision is whether it leaves any room for the "inventive concept" test raised by earlier Supreme Court decisions, including Mayo v....more

Supreme Court Asked for Further Clarity on Patent-Eligibility of Diagnostic Claims

Did the Federal Circuit incorrectly interpret and apply the holding of the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision regarding patent-eligibility of medical methods as set forth in Mayo Collaborative Services v. Prometheus Laboratories,...more

Can You Patent Human Genes? ACLU Says No [Video]

April 12 (Bloomberg Law) -- On April 15, 2013, the United States Supreme Court will hear oral arguments for Association for Molecular Pathology v. Myriad Genetics, Inc. The case centers on whether patents may be granted on...more

Yours, Mine and Ours (not yet!): An Update on the Patentability of Human Genes  [Video]

We have all heard the popular adage, "the whole is greater than the sum of the parts." Can we ever say that the parts, when divided, are greater than their assembled whole? In relation to the issue of genetic patentability,...more

Top Three Stories of 2012

Reflecting upon the events of the past twelve months, Patent Docs presents its sixth annual list of top biotech/pharma patent stories. For 2012, we identified fifteen stories that were covered on Patent Docs last year that...more

Federal Circuit Again Upholds Patent-Eligibility of Myriad's Isolated DNA Claims, Holds Diagnostic “Analyzing” Claims...

On August 16, 2012, in the most recent decision in one of the most controversial and publicized biotech patent cases in many years, the Federal Circuit again decided the “ACLU/Myriad” gene patenting case (formally, The...more

Myriad Oral Arguments: Deja Vu?

On Friday, July 20, 2012, the Federal Circuit heard oral arguments in Association for Molecular Pathology v. Myriad Genetics, Inc. (the ACLU ”gene patenting”/BRCAI case), which is on remand in view of the Supreme Court...more

What Do The IP Lawyers Have To Say In The Myriad Remand?

Several associations and organizations of intellectual property lawyers submitted amicus briefs in the Federal Circuit remand of Association for Molecular Pathology v. Myriad Genetics, Inc. (the ACLU “gene patenting”/BRCA1...more

The Myriad And ACLU Supplemental Briefs On Remand To The Federal Circuit

Myriad and the ACLU filed their supplemental briefs in the remand of Association for Molecular Pathology v. Myriad Genetics, Inc. (the ACLU “gene patenting”/BRCA1 case), addressing the Federal Circuit’s question as to the...more

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