Title VII Employer Liability Issues

Title VII of the Civil Rights Act is a United States federal law enacted in 1964 and aimed at preventing discrimination in the workplace on the basis of race, color, sex, national origin, and religion. Title VII... more +
Title VII of the Civil Rights Act is a United States federal law enacted in 1964 and aimed at preventing discrimination in the workplace on the basis of race, color, sex, national origin, and religion. Title VII has been subsequently extended to discrimination on the basis of pregnancy and sexual stereotypes and to prohibit sexual harassment. Title VII applies to all employers with fifteen or more employees including private employers, state and local governments, and educational institutions.  less -
News & Analysis as of

Holiday Systems Voluntarily Settles EEOC Sex Harassment & Retaliation Charges After Agency Finds Violation

LAS VEGAS - Holiday Systems International, a Las Vegas-based travel wholesaler, has agreed to settle alleged sex harassment and retaliation charges filed with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), the...more

The Same-Sex Marriage Ruling: Key Employment Law Take-Aways

On June 26, 2015, the Supreme Court of the United States answered the two questions it posed in the consolidated same-sex case, Obergefell v. Hodges, No. 14-556 (June 26, 2015). The consolidated case arose from challenges to...more

Unfortunately, Offensive Racial Comments Don’t Always Get You Fired (At Least Under Labor Law)

Under the National Labor Relations Act, certain union activities are considered “protected.” That is, employees engaging in union activity, or union representatives carrying out their duties in the context of grievance...more

Fenwick Employment Brief - June 2015

Employer’s Motive, Not Confirmed Knowledge Of Accommodation Need, Is Basis Of Religious Accommodation Violation - Federal anti-discrimination laws (“Title VII”) prohibit an employer from refusing to hire a candidate to...more

Pregnancy Discrimination Prohibition To Be Included in Florida Civil Rights Act

In April 2014, the Florida Supreme Court held in Delva v. The Continental Group, Inc. that pregnancy discrimination was encompassed within “sex” discrimination as protected in the then-enacted version of the Florida Civil...more

Five EEOC Initiatives to Monitor on the Agency’s Silver Anniversary

The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (“EEOC”) opened its doors on July 2, 1965, exactly one year after President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Title VII of that act (“Title VII”) prohibits...more

Cumulative Harassment Theory Must Include Individual Claims That Meet Severe and Pervasive Threshold

Sometimes, employees believe that they have been discriminated against or harassed based on their membership in multiple protected categories. Employers often receive EEOC charges that identify race and sex, or age and...more

Pioneer Hotel to Pay $150,000 to Settle EEOC National Origin / Color Harassment & Discrimination Suit

Hotel Failed to Halt a Barrage of Racial Slurs Endured by a Class of Latino / Brown-Skinned Workers, Federal Agency Charged - LAS VEGAS - Pioneer Hotel, Inc. in Laughlin, Nev., will pay $150,000 and furnish other...more

Fourth Circuit Lowers Bar for Employees in Title VII Retaliation Claims

The case involved an African American cocktail waitress who claimed she was called a “porch monkey” by another employee twice within a 24 hour period. Shortly after reporting the incidents, her employment was terminated. She...more

EEOC v. Abercrombie & Fitch Continued: Did the Supreme Court Pave the Way for ADA Claims Based on Nonobvious Disabilities?

Earlier this month, the Supreme Court decided EEOC v. Abercrombie & Fitch, a Title VII case involving religious discrimination. While the case did not directly involve the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), the...more

Retaliation in the Fourth Circuit: Recent Decision Creates New Challenges for Employers

In May 2015, the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals (which has jurisdiction over federal courts in Maryland, West Virginia, Virginia, North Carolina, and South Carolina) issued an opinion with negative consequences for employers...more

Employment Law - June 2015

Actual Knowledge by Employer Not Necessary for Title VII Religious Discrimination Claim, U.S. Supreme Court Rules - Why it matters: In a closely watched case, the U.S. Supreme Court sided with a teenage applicant to...more

Supreme Court Holds That Employers Do Not Need Actual Knowledge of an Applicant’s Need for a Religious Accommodation Before They...

The Supreme Court recently held that job applicants may hold their potential employer liable for intentional discrimination under Title VII if the applicant can show that his or her need for an accommodation was a motivating...more

Ebola Fears: Employer Best Practices for Epidemic Preparedness

Potential Ebola virus exposure is a concern that strikes fear in many. Employers may be confronted—if they have not been already—with difficult managerial decisions that must address employees' rational—or irrational—fears of...more

Should You Have an Anti-Bullying Policy in Your Workplace?

We have seen it before: boss shouts (or glares, or laughs) at subordinate, and subordinate’s feelings are hurt. But it’s not only feelings that are hurt, and angry bosses aren’t the only ones offending. Workplace bullying can...more

The Transformation of Transgender Rights in the Workplace

Gender transition and transgender identity has taken center stage in the media recently. However, out of the spotlight, the rights of transgender persons may be unclear to many. Transgender persons struggle with difficult...more

OSHA Publishes Guide to Restroom Access for Transgender Workers

On June 1, 2015, OSHA published a Guide to Restroom Access for Transgender Workers. The publication provides guidance to employers on best practices for restroom access for transgender workers. The agency has estimated that...more

Employee Allowed to Pursue Claim Despite Failure to Follow Rules

One of the first things a savvy employer or employer's attorney may do upon receipt of a claim, charge, or complaint, is look for deficiencies which may serve as a bar to suit. ...more

Supreme Court Sides with Applicant in Abercrombie Headscarf Dispute

Yesterday, in EEOC v. Abercrombie & Fitch Stores, Inc., 575 U.S. ___ (2015), the Supreme Court of the United States held that an applicant does not need to inform an employer of her need for a religious accommodation in order...more

Supreme Court Clarifies Burden of Proof for Religious Accommodation and Disparate-Treatment Claims

The U.S. Supreme Court sided with the EEOC today and clarified the standard for religious accommodation and disparate-treatment claims under Title VII. The Court ruled that an applicant can advance a disparate-treatment claim...more

It Takes Two (Racial Slurs to Support a Claim of Harassment, That Is)

Before we begin the analysis of the recent Fourth Circuit opinion in Boyer-Liberto v. Fontainebleau, let’s take a moment to clear something up: When asking how many times an employee may permissibly hurl a racial slur at...more

Dress Codes, Religion and the Workplace – More Than Meets the Eye

What makes 'Abercrombie' difficult for employers is that the employee does not necessarily need to request an accommodation first. First Glance analysis of a recent SCOTUS decision on religious accommodation with broad...more

High Court: Applicant Need Not Specifically Request Religious Accommodation To Maintain Title VII Claim

On June 1, 2015, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that an applicant rejected for a retail store position by Abercrombie & Fitch because she wore a headscarf could maintain a Title VII claim against the retailer, even though she...more

U.S. Supreme Court Sides with EEOC in Abercrombie & Fitch Religious Accommodation Case

In an 8-1 decision issued yesterday, the United States Supreme Court found that Abercrombie & Fitch violated Title VII of the Civil Rights Act by refusing to hire Samantha Elauf, a Muslim woman who wore a headscarf to her job...more

Asking Supervisor to Stop Harassment Qualifies as Protected Activity Under Title VII

A recent Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals ruling may concern employers, since it gives a broad definition to Title VII retaliation claims. On April 22, the court of appeals affirmed the trial court in ruling that informal...more

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