UTSA

News & Analysis as of

FDA Says BPCIA Poses No Fifth Amendment Taking for Innovator Biologics Submitted Prior to Its Enactment

On the same day that FDA approved the first biosimilar of Humira, the fourth biosimilar to be approved in the U.S., it also denied a citizen petition filed by Abbott Laboratories (now AbbVie) requesting that FDA not accept...more

The Defend Trade Secrets Act: A Powerful New Tool for Employers

Trade secrets provide significant value for American companies. Take, for example, the formula for Coca-Cola. The exact formula for the popular softdrink is a closely guarded secret, and Coca-Cola’s exclusive ability to make...more

The Location of Old McDonald’s Beehives Are Trade Secrets: Database Showing “Realistically” Ascertainable Locations Entitled to...

To qualify as a trade secret under either the UTSA or the DTSA, the information in question must not be “readily ascertainable” through “proper means.” But what does “readily ascertainable” mean?  If information is...more

MBHB Snippets: A review of developments in Intellectual Property Law - Volume 14, Issue 3

Supplemental Examination: Potential Benefits vs. Guaranteed Risks - The America Invents Act of 2011 introduced supplemental examination of patents as a post-grant process intended to limit expensive and unpredictable...more

Trade Secrets in the Spotlight Again: the EU Directive

May 2016 was a banner month for trade secret protection around the world. On May 11, 2016, President Obama signed the Defend Trade Secrets Act of 2016 (“DTSA”) into US law, creating a new Federal cause of action for...more

Intellectual Property Bulletin - Summer 2016

Supreme Court Expands Discretion to Award Enhanced Damages for Patent Infringement and Eliminates the Federal Circuit’s ‘Seagate Test’ - In Halo Electronics, Inc. v. Pulse Electronics, Inc., the U.S. Supreme Court...more

August 2016: Seizures as a Remedy Under the New Federal Trade Secrets Act

On May 11, 2016, President Obama signed the Defend Trade Secrets Act (DTSA), creating a new federal cause of action for the misappropriation of trade secrets. Prior to the DTSA, trade secret claims were governed by state law....more

Defend Trade Secrets Act — Implications for Private Funds

On May 11, 2016, the federal Defend Trade Secrets Act (DTSA) became law. The DTSA provides trade-secret protections on the federal level that are similar to those available through the Uniform Trade Secrets Act (UTSA)...more

The Federal Defend Trade Secrets Act vs. The California Uniform Trade Secrets Act

Although some version of the Uniform Trade Secrets Act (“UTSA”) has widely been adopted by most states, including California, variations among the versions and related judicial interpretation has led to...more

Defend Trade Secrets Act of 2016: What Does It Mean for Employers?

On May 11, 2016, President Obama signed the Defend Trade Secrets Act (DTSA) into law, creating a federal claim for misappropriation of trade secrets. Concerns with the difficulty of protecting trade secrets have grown as...more

Employment Law Commentary - Volume 28, Issue 6 - June 2016

The Defend Trade Secrets Act – What Employers Need To Know Right Now - Trade secrets are a critical component of the intellectual property of a company, either standing alone or as a complement to a company’s patent...more

Trade secrets law in the Internet age

How do you maintain a trade secret in the Internet age? As in the punch line to an old joke, “VERY CAREFULLY.”...more

New Weapon For Manufacturers: Defend Trade Secrets Act of 2016

On May 11, 2016, President Barack Obama signed the Defend Trade Secrets Act of 2016 (the “DTSA”), which provides a federal civil cause of action to manufacturers for the misappropriation of trade secrets under the Economic...more

Will Privacy Enforcement Actions Impact “Reasonable” Security Measures Needed to Protect Trade Secrets?

In widely-publicized, contested privacy cases last year, the FTC advocated in favor of a high baseline for information security measures.  Among the security practices attacked by the FTC as critical mistakes by companies...more

Burr Alert: What The New Federal Trade Secrets Law Means For Employees

The scope of the federal Defend Trade Secrets Act ("DTSA") enacted on May 11, 2016 extends well beyond employment issues. However, its impact on an employers' asset protection and enforcement program is quite significant....more

The New Defend Trade Secrets Act: Implications For Employers

With the enactment of the federal Defend Trade Secrets Act of 2016 (DTSA), owners of trade secrets now have the ability to bring a cause of action for misappropriation of trade secrets in federal court. Previously, employers...more

Misappropriation of Trade Secrets: Make a Federal Case Out of It (Under the Defend Trade Secrets Act)

Last month, President Obama signed the Defend Trade Secrets Act (“DTSA”) into law, which permits plaintiffs to bring civil claims for misappropriation of trade secrets in federal court. While trade secret theft has been a...more

Harmonization of Trade Secrets in Europe and New US Trade Secrets Law Gets the Green Light—What Do These Changes Mean for...

A harmonized trade secrets protection regime is coming to Europe and the US. Until now, there has been a fragmented approach to trade secrets across Europe, with some countries having specific trade secrets legislation and...more

What’s To Know About the Defend Trade Secrets Act of 2016

Congress has passed the Defend Trade Secrets Act of 2016 and the president is expected to sign it into law. The DTSA allows suits in federal court for misappropriation of trade secrets. Before the DTSA, most litigants would...more

The Current State of Trade Secret Law and how the New Federal Statute Will Shape the Landscape

Trade Secret Protection Schemes: •State: Uniform Trade Secrets Act –Adopted in various forms between 1979 and 2013 •Common Law –New York and Massachusetts •Federal: Defend Trade Secrets Act –Amends the...more

First Round of DTSA Complaints Alleging Misappropriation Activity Both Before and After DTSA’s Enactment: Will They Stick?

Following President Obama’s signing of the federal Defend Trade Secrets Act (“DTSA” or the “Act”) into law last week, parties are beginning to file lawsuits asserting claims under the DTSA. As widely reported, before the...more

Obama Signs Law Giving Trade Secrets Federal Protection

A company’s confidential trade secrets are their most coveted assets and give a company a competitive edge over its competitors. Such trade secrets may include product specifications and formulas, recipes, computer...more

Pssst, The Secret Is Knowing What You Can’t Do With The Defend Trade Secrets Act

The Defend Trade Secrets Act (“DTSA”) became law with President Obama’s signature on May 11, 2016. The DTSA is an amendment to the Economic Espionage Act of 1996 and, for the first time, affords a federal private right of...more

Defend Trade Secrets Act Creates New Federal Claim For Misappropriation of Trade Secrets

On May 11, 2016, President Barack Obama signed the Defend Trade Secrets Act of 2016 (DTSA) into law, creating a federal civil right of action for the theft of trade secrets. Until now, trade secrets had been protected only at...more

Defend Trade Secrets Act is Enacted

In late April, Congress approved the Defend Trade Secrets Act of 2016 (“DTSA” or the “Act”) with over-whelming bipartisan majorities. President Obama signed DTSA into law on May 11, and it takes effect immediately. First...more

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