News & Analysis as of

Confidential Information Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA)

The Supreme Court Punts on Clarifying the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act

The federal Computer Fraud and Abuse Act of 1986 (“CFAA”) has generated controversy and disagreement among courts and commentators regarding the scope of its application. The statute, 18 U.S.C. § 1030, which provides for...more

Supreme Court Refuses to Hear Password-Sharing Case, Leaving Scope of Criminal Liability Under Computer Fraud and Abuse Act...

by Seyfarth Shaw LLP on

On Tuesday, October 10, 2017, the United States Supreme Court denied certiorari in Nosal v. United States, 16-1344. Nosal asked the Court to determine whether a person violates the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act’s prohibition...more

Nosal Reply Brief Sets Stage For SCOTUS Cert Decision

The U.S. Supreme Court, which just began a new term on Monday with a full complement of nine justices, is expected to soon decide whether it will hear the appeal of David Nosal, the former Korn Ferry executive whose...more

Unauthorized Computer Access, Without Service Interruption, May Be Cause for Action

by Taylor English Duma LLP on

In a case of first impression, the Eleventh Circuit has held that an employer need not show an interruption of service to prove actionable harm under the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA) and other federal laws. This is...more

Password Sharing Is Not a Crime, Ninth Circuit Reassures in Denial of Nosal’s Request for Rehearing

Since the early days of this blog, we’ve been covering the ongoing legal battle involving ex-Korn Ferry recruiter David Nosal as it winds its way through the courts. The latest chapter in this saga came on December 8, 2016,...more

What Underlying Facts are Required to Assert a Valid CFAA Claim Based on “Exceeds Authorized Access” in Georgia?

by Seyfarth Shaw LLP on

The Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (“CFAA”) gives rise to an actionable claim if someone “knowingly access[es] a computer without authorization or exceed[s] authorized access.” 18 U.S.C. § 1030(a)(1). The term “exceeds...more

Ninth Circuit Rules on Meaning of “Without Authorization” under Computer Fraud and Abuse Act

by Nossaman LLP on

Last month, the Ninth Circuit affirmed the criminal conviction of an individual for accessing a computer “without authorization” in violation of the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (“CFAA”). U.S. v. Nosal (9th Cir., July 5,...more

Sparks Fly in Ninth Circuit’s Nosal II Opinion

As many loyal TSW readers know, we’ve been watching the ongoing saga involving ex-Korn Ferry recruiter David Nosal wind its way through the courts since the early days of this blog. And last month, the highly anticipated...more

Déjà Vu Not All Over Again: Ninth Circuit Strengthens CFAA In Nosal II

On July 5, 2016, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals issued its highly anticipated decision in the most recent chapter of United States v. Nosal, holding that an individual acts "without authorization" as used in the Computer...more

Taking a Walk Back to a Kinder, Gentler Interpretation of the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act

by Brooks Pierce on

We don’t usually talk about four-year-old court decisions in the first instance here. But the Ninth Circuit has issued a pair of noteworthy opinions interpreting the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act in the last few weeks. And...more

Password sharing and “head-slap hacks”: What employers can do

If you have ever wondered why your company’s data is not as secure as it should be, take a look in the mirror. A study by the Ponemon Institute, commissioned by Experian and released in May, found that the majority of...more

Aveta And The Use Of Confidential Info In FCA Cases

by Morrison & Foerster LLP on

In a recent case in the District of Puerto Rico, United States ex rel. Valdez v. Aveta Inc., et al., No. 15-cv-01140-CCC (D.P.R.), the former president of Puerto Rican-based managed health care provider Aveta Inc., Jose...more

Ninth Circuit Vastly Expands Scope of Criminal, Civil Liability for Computer Fraud

by Ballard Spahr LLP on

In a pair of highly anticipated decisions, the Ninth Circuit significantly reshaped criminal and civil liability under the federal Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA). The court’s recent decisions in United States v. Nosal...more

Court Upholds Conviction Of Ex-Employee For Conspiring To Access Company Data Through “Shared” Password

Is password sharing a crime? It can be under the right circumstances, according to last week’s decision in United States v. Nosal. In Nosal, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit upheld the conviction of a former...more

Computer Fraud and Abuse Act Ruling: Did the Ninth Circuit Just Criminalize Password Sharing?

by Seyfarth Shaw LLP on

Not exactly. A divided Ninth Circuit panel recently affirmed the conviction of a former employee under the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (“CFAA”), holding that “[u]nequivocal revocation of computer access closes both the front...more

Ninth Circuit Rules that CFAA Imposes Criminal Penalties When Terminated Users Try To Access Systems With Borrowed Passwords

by Reed Smith on

It can be a violation of the federal Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (“CFAA”) to “access[] a protected computer without authorization.” The CFAA clearly applies when criminals with no connection to a company try to force their...more

The Ninth Circuit Addresses the Scope of the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act

by Fenwick & West LLP on

This week, the Ninth Circuit clarified the scope of the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA) in upholding the defendant’s criminal conviction in United States v. David Nosal....more

Federal Court Rejects Employer’s Trade Secret and Computer Fraud and Abuse Act Claims

by Seyfarth Shaw LLP on

An ex-employee’s former employer sued him for alleged violations of the Kansas Uniform Trade Secrets Act (KUTSA) and the federal Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA). The first claim was based on the company’s hunch that he...more

Recent Decision Highlights Important Pleading Requirements for Computer Fraud and Abuse Act Claims

by Seyfarth Shaw LLP on

Ever since Iqbal and Twombly, it has become imperative that a complaint filed in federal court contains “sufficient factual matter, accepted as true, to ‘state a claim to relief that is plausible on its face.’” Ashcroft v....more

Sanctions for Bringing a Computer Fraud and Abuse Act Claim?

by Fisher Phillips on

Federal courts have continued to disagree on whether the Computer Fraud & Abuse Act ("CFAA") applies to employees who misuse confidential information or trade secrets obtained from an employer's computer system that the...more

SCOTUS upholds Computer Fraud and Abuse Act conviction

The Supreme Court of the United States held on January 25, 2016, that an executive of a shipping company who hacked into his former employer’s computer system after he left the company was guilty under the Computer Fraud and...more

Employees and “Authorized Access”: A Threat from Within?

Workplace privacy has become an increasingly challenging issue for employees and employers alike. With technological advancements, employers have enhanced visibility into employee behavior including their use of company...more

What is a Federal Computer Crime? It depends where you are

When an employee has access to data for work, but the employee uses it for non-work purposes, is that a federal crime under the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA) (18 U.S.C. § 1030)? The answer depends on where you are....more

Data privacy in the Americas - At a glance

by FordHarrison on

As multinational employers are aware, data privacy laws can vary greatly from jurisdiction to jurisdiction. Ensuring compliance with the different requirements can be challenging, and the penalties for noncompliance can be...more

Think Before You Tack CFAA Claims on to Your Trade Secret Misappropriation Case

Before you include a Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (“CFAA”) claim in a trade secret case, consider carefully: was the data acquired through “unauthorized access” or was it just misused by the defendants? If it was properly...more

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Cybersecurity

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