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Hiring & Firing Social Media Section 7

Hiring & Firing refers to the process of recruiting, interviewing and offering employment and the process of evaluating performance and dismissing employees. Hiring & Firing is a highly regulated area and... more +
Hiring & Firing refers to the process of recruiting, interviewing and offering employment and the process of evaluating performance and dismissing employees. Hiring & Firing is a highly regulated area and can create tremendous liability for employers who fail to properly adhere to acceptable employment practices. Some of the potential pitfalls in this area stem from discriminatory hiring practices, improper performance evaluations, and retaliatory firings.  less -

There’s no debate: freedom of speech presents challenging legal issues for workers and employers in the age of social media

by Womble Bond Dickinson on

John Pueschel, partner in the Winston-Salem office of Womble Bond Dickinson, examines the limits on employee free speech and use of social media against the background of recent events at Google and in Charlottesville....more

Digital Disruptions: Handling Social Media Misuse By Students And Educators

by Fisher Phillips on

Beginning with the launch of Myspace and Facebook in the early part of the last decade, social media communication has taken the world by storm. Today, social media networking is the primary means of communicating about one’s...more

Employer Cannot Fire Employees For Obscenity-Laced Facebook Posts During Union Organizing Campaign

by Tonkon Torp LLP on

Section 7 of the National Labor Relations Act protects employees who engage in concerted activities for purposes of collective bargaining or for mutual aid and protection. How far that protection extends was tested in NLRB v....more

Second Circuit Holds Termination of Employee Who Attacked Supervisor in Obscene Facebook Post Violates NLRA

The Second Circuit said last week that an employer violated the National Labor Relations Act when it fired an employee who criticized a supervisor on Facebook during an election. The catch here is that the Second Circuit...more

2016 presidential election dynamics in the workplace: Free speech? ‘You’re fired’

by McAfee & Taft on

None of us are immune from this year’s presidential election dynamics. Disrespect and name-calling seem more prevalent than policy discussions. The election is highly polarizing, potentially pitting employee against...more

The Second Circuit “Likes” the NLRB’s Reasoning

by Kelley Drye & Warren LLP on

In recent years, the National Labor Relations Board has tended to protect employees’ social media activity against employers. A few weeks ago, the Second Circuit upheld a decision of the National Labor Relations Board...more

Second Circuit Finds Facebook “Likes” Protected Under NLRA

by Genova Burns LLC on

On October 21, 2015, the Second Circuit clarified in Triple Play Sports Bar and Grille v. National Labor Relations Board that protections provided under Section 7 of the National Labor Relations Act (“NLRA”) encompass...more

Second Circuit Upholds That Facebook "Likes" Can Be Protected, Concerted Activity

by Faegre Baker Daniels on

On October 21, 2015, the Second Circuit upheld the National Labor Relations Board’s (NLRB) earlier ruling that clicking the Facebook “Like” button can be protected concerted activity. The Triple Play Sports Bar & Grill fired...more

NLRB Issues Pair of Decisions Limiting Employer Discipline and Policies Regarding Social Media

The National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) recently issued a pair of decisions helping to clarify the limits on employers’ ability to (1) discipline employees for their social media activities and (2) implement confidentiality...more

NLRB: Use of Social Media Can Be Protected Employee Activity

by Ifrah PLLC on

The rise of social media has led to the application of old law to new forms of communication. For instance, an effort by the National Labor Relations Board to educate workers on their right to engage in protected concerted...more

Board Affirms Decision Ordering Reinstatement Of Employees Terminated For Facebook Comments

by McNees Wallace & Nurick LLC on

On September 20, 2011, we reported on Hispanics United of Buffalo, Inc., the first National Labor Relations Board Administrative Law Judge decision examining an employee's discharge for social media activity. Recently, the...more

National Labor Relations Board Adds To Facebook Jurisprudence; Finds Posts To Be Protected, Concerted Activity

by Franczek Radelet P.C. on

The National Labor Relations Board issued its first social media decision in September. Last week, the NLRB issued another social media decision in a case involving employees’ Facebook comments and an employer’s right to...more

NLRB: Discharging Non-Union Employee’s for Facebook Posts Violated NLRA

by Miller Canfield on

In September 2011, we alerted you to the decision in Hispanics United of Buffalo, a decision by a National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) Administrative Law Judge (ALJ) examining an employer’s termination of employees because...more

NLRB: Employees' Facebook Comments Are Protected Concerted Activity

The National Labor Relations Board’s closed out an already busy year addressing social media’s impact on employee rights in non-unionized workplaces (see our prior related blog entries here, here, here, and here) with yet...more

NLRB Is Finding Ways To Implement Its Employee Rights Notice Posting, In Spite Of Legal Challenges

On September 28, 2012, a three-member panel of the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) affirmed the decision of an Administrative Law Judge (ALJ) who upheld a car dealership’s firing of a salesperson that was based on a...more

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