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R. v. Montague: Are Mandatory Forfeiture Orders Imposed After Conviction “Sentences”, Providing a Right of Appeal?

Criminal appeals are statutory and there must be a right of appeal for an appellate court to properly have jurisdiction over an appeal. The Ontario Court of Appeal’s June 3, 2014 decision in R. v. Montague considered whether...more

The risk of self-incrimination in international cross-border disputes

The risk to the privilege against self-incrimination is not limited to proceedings taking place in parallel in Canada and the United States (U.S.). The case of R. v. Eurocopter Canada Ltd., [2004] O.J. No. 2120, is a good...more

BB&K Police Bulletin: Police Order To Stay Put While Conducting Background Check Is A Seizure Under Fourth Amendment

The Command Can Implicate Municipal Liability - Overview: The Ninth Circuit recently held that, when a police officer orders a suspect to “stay put,” that command constitutes a seizure under the Fourth Amendment of the...more

U.S. Supreme Court: Warrant Generally Required to Search Information on a Cell Phone, Even Incident to Arrest

The United States Supreme Court has ruled that police officers must generally secure a warrant before searching through the contents of a cell phone of a person they arrest. This decision will have important implications for...more

Riley v. California Advances Individual Privacy Rights in this Digital Age

Employee privacy rights may have received a boost from the U.S. Supreme Court at the end of this year’s term. In Riley v. California, the most recent in a series of criminal search and seizure cases involving technology, the...more

Do the Police Need a Warrant to Get My Blood? #ArizonaDUIAttorney

As an Arizona DUI attorney, I routinely represent clients whose blood has been taken without their permission. In some cases, the police officers have obtained a telephonic search warrant. In other cases, the officers simply...more

Supreme Court to Protect Information on Cell Phones

The digital age has created a world in which over-sharing is the norm and electronic devices are capable of storing significant amounts of one’s personal information. However, in an important step to protect the privacy of...more

Digital Privacy’s New Age: Supreme Court Turns off Google’s Radio After Holding That We Are Our Cell Phones

In another installment of “Google does WHAT?!?,” the Supreme Court on June 30 rejected the Silicon Valley giant’s bid to stop a lawsuit accusing the search company of wiretapping. You read that right. Wiretapping....more

Five Lessons for Employers from California v. Riley

In the waning days of its current term, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled unanimously in California v. Riley that police officers generally violate the Fourth Amendment's prohibition against unreasonable searches by conducting a...more

Editorial: High Court Is Swinging Pendulum Back On 4th Amendment

Fourth Amendment law is anything but static. If one surveys the jurisprudential landscape over the last 50 years, there are three amendments that the U.S. Supreme Court cannot leave alone: the First, the Fourth and the Fifth....more

The Right to Remain Silent Does Not Extend to Computer/Phone Passwords

Recently the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court ruled that under certain circumstances, a court may compel a criminal defendant to provide the password to encrypted digital evidence without violating the defendant’s...more

Illinois Supreme Court Debates Automatic Revocation of Certain Health Professionals' Licenses

Our reports on the oral arguments of the May term of the Illinois Supreme Court conclude this morning with Consiglio v. Department of Financial and Professional Regulation. Consiglio involves a constitutional challenge to...more

Legal Updates for Government Entities Covering May and June 2014

Arizona Court of Appeals (heading) Immunity under A.R.S. § 12-820.03 Glazer v. State of Arizona, --P.3d--, 2014 WL949114 (Ariz.App. 2014) This case arises out of a cross-over crash on I-10 south of...more

Status Updates - July 2014 #2

..The New York Court of Appeals has struck down that state’s “cyberbullying” law in a 5-2 decision, finding that it is overly broad and chills First Amendment-protected speech. The case arose when a 15-year-old boy pleaded...more

Short Wins - the Presentment Delay Issue

It's a relatively slow week in the federal circuits. My favorite case of the last week is United States v. Torres Pimental. You've got to love a suppression motion being granted off of a government delay in...more

In Riley, Supreme Court Sets Mobile Device Privacy Expectations

In a recent decision with significant implications for smart phone users’ privacy expectations, the Supreme Court, in Riley v. California, unanimously rejected the application of the “incident to arrest doctrine” to law...more

United States Supreme Court: Warrants are required to search digital data on seized cell phones

On June 25, 2014, in Riley v. California, a unanimous United States Supreme Court held that the Fourth Amendment requires that police obtain a warrant prior to searching the digital data found on an arrested suspect’s cell...more

New Mexico Supreme Court Applies Padilla Retroactively to 1990

In 2010, the Supreme Court of the United States, in the case of Padilla v. Kentucky, 559 U.S. 356 (2010), held that a defense attorney’s failure to advise the defendant concerning the risk of removal fell below the objective...more

U.S. Supreme Court’s Decision Raises Questions About Cell Phone Searches in Schools

The long-standing test for searching students at school requires that the search must be based on a “reasonable suspicion” that the student violated a school rule or law. A recent criminal decision from the United States...more

ANOTHER WIN FOR ALEYNIKOV: Judge Tosses Evidence in Ex-Programmer’s Latest Case

Sergey Aleynikov fought the law, and the law lost—again. Judge Ronald A. Zweibel of the New York Supreme Court has thrown out a raft of evidence originally gathered by the FBI for federal prosecution and later offered...more

U.S. Court of Appeals Decision: Cell Location Data is Protected Under Individual’s Expectation of Privacy

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit recently considered whether cell site location data is protected by the Fourth Amendment. On June 11, 2014, the court issued its decision in favor of privacy rights: the...more

Supreme Court Prohibits Warrantless Mobile Phone Searches, Underscores Individual Right to Privacy

The Supreme Court of the United States released a unanimous decision last week barring law enforcement from searching the mobile phones of individuals placed under arrest without first obtaining a search warrant or the...more

Supreme Court Rules That Police May Not Search Cell Phones Without A Warrant

One of the fundamental liberties protected by the Bill of Rights is freedom from unreasonable searches. The Fourth Amendment reflects the concern that “We the People” should not be subjected to intrusive searches of our...more

In Riley v. California, Supreme Court Rules Police Must Obtain Warrant before Searching Cell Phones

In a unanimous decision issued last week, the Supreme Court ruled that police cannot search the cell phones of arrested individuals without a warrant. In reaching its decision, the Court recognized that there is an immense...more

Ninth Circuit: Ordinance Criminalizing Living in Car Is Unconstitutionally Vague

If you eat, talk on the phone, and escape the rain in your car, are you using the car “as living quarters either overnight, day-by-day, or otherwise?” What if you load up the car with personal belongings for a camping...more

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