Biotechnology Myriad

News & Analysis as of

What impact will the Australian Myriad decision have on patent eligibility of diagnostic tests?

By now most will know that: (a) Australia’s final appeal Court has made adverse findings against Myriad’s patent for utilising the BRCA1 locus to diagnose breast cancer; (b) the rejected claims are only those that...more

Can we patent products found in nature? It's complicated. An update on Australia's Myriad decision...

It remains to be seen if this new Myriad decision in Australia will be extended as it was in the U.S. to prevent virtually any product found in nature from being patented....more

What did the Australian High Court actually say about the patent eligibility of cDNA?

As the dust from the impact of the Australian Myriad decision begins to settle, now is the time to revisit what many have said regarding patent eligibility of cDNA, against what the final appeal Court actually said. On...more

“Does a nucleic acid constitute patent eligible subject matter under Australia law?”

That is the question that we hoped Australia’s final appeal Court to have answered in the Myriad decision that it handed down last week. Some observers have been quite forthright on the point: ‘Yes, the High Court of...more

Does a Nucleic Acid Constitute Patent Eligible Subject Matter Under Australian Law?

Clearly the High Court has given an answer to a question, but was that question the one we anticipated? That in itself is an open question!...more

Australian High Court Rules Gene Patents Unpatentable

Like the United States Supreme Court, the High Court of Australia has determined that Myriad’s patents directed to purified and isolated DNA molecules encoding the BRCA genes are unpatentable. Indeed, the Australian Court...more

News from Abroad: High Court Rules Myriad's BRCA Genes Not Patentable Subject Matter in Australia

Just over one year after the Full Federal Court of Australia unanimously upheld an earlier Federal Court decision that naturally occurring nucleic acid molecules are patentable in Australia, the High Court of Australia has...more

Australia High Court Rules Against Gene Patents

Colleagues in Australia have been spreading the bad news: The High Court of Australia followed the lead (?) of the U.S. Supreme Court and determined that Myriad cannot patent the isolated BRCA1 gene in Australia. Thanks to...more

High Court of Australia determines isolated BRCA1 gene not patentable in Australia

The High Court of Australia has unanimously overturned previous decisions from lower courts and has held that certain claims to Myriad's patent for isolated BRCA1 nucleic acid molecules are not patentable in Australia...more

Strong Support for Sequenom’s Petition for Rehearing En Banc

In Ariosa Diagnostics Inc. v. Sequenom Inc., 788 F.3d 1371 (Fed. Cir. 2015), a Federal Circuit panel held that Sequenom Inc.’s prenatal diagnosis patent claims patent ineligible subject matter under the two-step test of Mayo...more

Federal Circuit’s Latest Patent Subject Matter Decision in Ariosa v. Sequenom Renders Many Biotech Patents at Risk

On June 12, 2015, the Federal Circuit issued its decision in Ariosa Diagnostics, Inc. v. Sequenom, Inc., finding that Sequenom’s patent claiming methods of using cell-free fetal DNA (“cffDNA”) for prenatal diagnosis test is...more

Is Biotech Patentable Subject Matter? [Video]

The issue of patent eligibility has been a hotly litigated issue in the field of intellectual property law, and both the Federal Circuit and the Supreme Court have issued numerous decisions in recent years--particularly in...more

Myriad Disappointments for Biotech, but Hope Remains

CAFC extends the reach of subject-matter ineligibility under Myriad - Following Myriad Genetic’s 2013 loss at the Supreme Court (Ass’n for Molecular Pathology v. Myriad Genetics, 133 S. Ct. 2107 (2013), herein “Myriad...more

Examination of Myriad-Mayo Guidance Comments -- University Community Joint Comment

On March 4, the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office issued a guidance memorandum, entitled "Guidance For Determining Subject Matter Eligibility Of Claims Reciting Or Involving Laws of Nature, Natural Phenomena, & Natural...more

Examination of Myriad-Mayo Guidance Comments -- International Bioindustry Associations

On March 4, the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office issued a guidance memorandum, entitled "Guidance For Determining Subject Matter Eligibility Of Claims Reciting Or Involving Laws of Nature, Natural Phenomena, & Natural...more

Examination of Myriad-Mayo Guidance Comments -- ACLU

On March 4, the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office issued a guidance memorandum entitled "Guidance For Determining Subject Matter Eligibility Of Claims Reciting Or Involving Laws of Nature, Natural Phenomena, & Natural...more

USPTO Tries to Address Public Misunderstandings Regarding Myriad-Mayo Guidance

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office spent the entire afternoon session of today's biotechnology/chemical/pharmaceutical (BCP) customer partnership meeting focusing on the guidance memorandum for determining the subject...more

More Q&A from Webinar on Top Patent Law Stories of 2013

On Tuesday, we presented a live webinar on the "Top Patent Law Stories of 2013." The webinar covered ten of the fourteen stories that made it onto Patent Docs seventh annual list of top biotech/pharma patent stories. Posts...more

Top Stories of 2013: #7 to #10

Reflecting upon the events of the past twelve months, Patent Docs presents its seventh annual list of top biotech/pharma patent stories. For 2013, we identified fourteen stories that were covered on Patent Docs last year...more

Myriad Genetics Files Amended Complaint Relating to Colon Cancer Genetic Diagnostic Testing

On July 19th, Myriad Genetics amended its complaint against Ambry Genetics to include claims to its patents relating to colon cancer predictive genetic diagnostic testing (amended complaint). ...more

Myriad Moves to Dismiss Ambry's Antitrust Counterclaims on Noerr-Pennington Doctrine

The Supreme Court, in Bell Atlantic Corp. v. Twombly, 550 U.S. 544, 570 (2007), and Ashcroft v. Iqbal, 556 U.S. 662 (2009), has in recent years focused the requirements for pleadings under the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure...more

Post-Myriad Strategies for Claiming Biotech Inventions in the United States

The United States Supreme Court recently ruled that genes or other naturally-occurring pieces of DNA are patent ineligible subject matter in Association for Molecular Pathology, et al. v. Myriad Genetics, Inc., et al. No....more

After Myriad: A Herd of Elephants in the Room

As we all know by now, the Supreme Court last month decided that isolated genes are not eligible for patenting. Although seemingly drawing a clear-cut distinction between DNA molecules having the same sequence as that which...more

Myriad: Comparing US Law with European, Japanese and Australian Law

The decision by the U.S. Supreme Court that isolated DNA having the same sequence as naturally-occurring DNA is not patentable subject matter is inconsistent with the position of the European Patent Office and Japanese law....more

Supreme Court Rules on Patentability of Human Genes

Today the U.S. Supreme Court answered the question "Are human genes patentable?" The Court, in Association of Molecular Pathology et al. v. Myriad Genetics, Inc. et al., ruled that isolated DNA is a product of nature and not...more

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