Equal Employment Opportunity Commission Supreme Court of the United States

The United States Equal Opportunity Commission is a federal agency created by Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. The EEOC is charged with enforcing anti-discrimination laws in the workplace.... more +
The United States Equal Opportunity Commission is a federal agency created by Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. The EEOC is charged with enforcing anti-discrimination laws in the workplace. Specifically, the Agency addresses instances where employees or applicants are discriminated against on the basis of color, race, sex, religion, national origin, disability, and/or genetic information.  less -
News & Analysis as of

Supreme Court Expands Religious Discrimination Liability

Most employers know that Title VII prohibits discrimination against applicants or employees based on religion. They also know that Title VII requires employers to provide reasonable, religion-based accommodations to employees...more

Muslim Applicant Can Proceed With Religious Discrimination Lawsuit

Samantha Elauf, a practicing Muslim, wore a headscarf when she interviewed for a job with Abercrombie & Fitch. Although the headscarf was not discussed during the interview, the store allegedly decided not to offer Elauf a...more

EEOC Rules that Sexual Orientation Discrimination is Sex Discrimination Under Title VII

On the heels of the landmark decision by the Supreme Court in favor of gay marriage, the EEOC held on July 15, 2015 that sex discrimination under Title VII includes discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation. Even...more

New Developments in Protections for LGBT Workers

It’s been a busy few weeks for developments in the area of LGBT rights since the Supreme Court’s decision in King v. Burwell , 576 U.S. ___ (2015)....more

The Equality Act: Federal Anti-LGBTQ Discrimination Law Introduced in Congress

Last month, in a historic case, the U.S. Supreme Court recognized that same-sex couples—like their heterosexual counterparts— have the constitutional right to marry. On the heels of this decision, federal agencies and...more

The Final Resolution of EEOC v. Abercrombie & Fitch After the U.S. Supreme Court’s Decision

The EEOC issued a press release on July 20, 2015 announcing that the federal appeals court has dismissed Abercrombie & Fitch’s (“AF”) appeal of the EEOC’s religious discrimination case because AF made the decision to settle...more

“Hair Today? Gone Tomorrow!”: Employers Face Obstacles When It Comes to Enforcing Look Policies

Your author joined the ranks of the bearded in January after six years of daily shaving for the Air Force, skillfully concealing his newfound hirsuteness (look it up) amid the current popularity in facial hair (see: Special...more

Health and Welfare Benefits for Same-Sex Spouses after Obergefell: A New Mandate for Employers?

After last month’s decision by the U.S. Supreme Court in Obergefell v. Hodges, employee benefit plan sponsors may wonder whether Obergefell affirmatively imposes an obligation for employers to provide health, life,...more

Abercrombie Settles Religious Discrimination Case Following Supreme Court Ruling in Favor of EEOC

WASHINGTON - A federal appeals court today dismissed Abercrombie & Fitch's appeal of EEOC's religious discrimination case against the company, the federal agency announced today. This represents the final resolution of EEOC...more

That is SO last week - July 2015 #3

There’s just no rest for employment lawyers this summer. We had another exciting week. The biggest news was the EEOC’s ruling that Title VII prohibits discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation. The agency found that...more

Is Sexual Orientation Now a Protected Class?

In our June 26 alert regarding the U.S. Supreme Court's same-sex marriage decision in Obergefell v. Hodges, we said we would continue to keep you posted regarding new developments in this area of the law. Some of you may...more

Employment Flash - July 2015

The July 2015 edition of Employment Flash covers a number of developments, including: the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling that job applicants need only show that a religious accommodation was a factor in denying employment to...more

The Obergefell Decision and Employers

The recent United States Supreme Court decision in Obergefell v. Hodges significantly altered the legal landscape with respect to same-sex marriages, finding that the Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution...more

The Supreme Court Addresses Federal Health Care Subsidies and Same-Sex Marriage

Two recent Supreme Court decisions have implications for employee benefit plan sponsors: King v. Burwell, decided June 25, 2015, and Obergefell v. Hodges, decided June 26, 2015....more

EEOC Modifies Pregnancy Bias Guidance to Reflect the Supreme Court’s Ruling in Young v. United Parcel Service, Inc.

On March 25, 2015, the United States Supreme Court ruled in favor of Peggy Young, a UPS driver who claimed she was discriminated against on the basis of pregnancy when she was denied a workplace accommodation that was made...more

Supreme Court Rules Against Abercrombie & Fitch in Religious Discrimination Case

In a previous blog post we discussed the facts, and potential consequences of a pro-plaintiff holding in Equal Employment Opportunity Commission v. Abercrombie & Fitch Store, Inc. As a brief recap, in 2008, Samantha Elauf, a...more

EEOC Issues Guidance - Best Practices for Pregnancy Discrimination and Related Issues

Discrimination on the basis of pregnancy, childbirth, or related medical conditions constitutes unlawful sex discrimination under Title VII. The EEOC recently issued new Enforcement Guidance to ensure employers treat women...more

Impact of Young V. UPS and Steps for Employers

Since 1978, pregnancy and pregnancy related health conditions have been protected conditions under the Pregnancy Discrimination Act (“PDA”). A recent Supreme Court case, Young v. UPS may increase the ability of pregnant...more

Court Shoots Down The EEOC At “Mach” Speed Based On “Sham” Conciliation Process

Amid the flurry of major U.S. Supreme Court decisions that were decided towards the end of the 2014-2015 term, the landmark decision in Mach Mining v. EEOC, No. 13-1019 (U.S. April 29, 2015), seems like ancient history. As we...more

U.S. Supreme Court Rules Against Abercrombie In Headscarf Religious Accommodation Case

The U.S. Supreme Court reinstated the EEOC’s lawsuit against Abercrombie & Fitch Stores, Inc., alleging that Abercrombie violated Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 by refusing to hire a Muslim applicant, who wore a...more

EEOC’s Revised Pregnancy Guidance: Now, Just Barely More Flexible!

Last Thursday, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission issued its amended guidance on pregnancy discrimination and accommodation in light of the U.S. Supreme Court decision in Young v. UPS, issued in March 2015. The...more

A Review of the Supreme Court’s 2014 - 2015 Term

During the United States Supreme Court’s 2014-2015 term, the Court departed from the pro-business reputation it had developed in labor and employment cases. This term, employees prevailed more often than not, including in...more

Supremes Say Abercrombie Not So Hip

The U.S. Supreme Court just issued its much-awaited religious discrimination decision in EEOC v. Abercrombie & Fitch, 575 U.S. ___ (June 1, 2015) (No. 14-86). Samantha Elauf applied for a job with A&F and was denied the job...more

That is SO last week - June 2015 #3

Last week's historic U.S. Supreme Court decision on same-sex marriage dominated the news across the country. Among its many effects, this ruling means that human resources departments will be busy revising Family and...more

Employment Law - June 2015 #2

Joint Employers Can Be Liable for Employee Misclassification in California: Why it matters - Liability under the California Labor Code extends to joint employers that are aware of a willful misclassification of an...more

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