Protected Activity

News & Analysis as of

Ninth Circuit Calls Into Question “No Reemployment” Provisions In California Settlement Agreements

On April 8, 2015, in Golden v. California Emergency Physicians Medical Group, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals broadly interpreted California’s statutory provisions regarding restrictive covenants in the context of...more

Petition Urges DOL To Target Contractual Clauses Discouraging Whistleblowing

The Government Accountability Project (GAP) and Zuckerman Law recently petitioned the U.S. Department of Labor (“DOL”) to issue rules and guidance prohibiting “de facto” gag clauses in settlement and severance agreements that...more

NLRB Rejects Profane Employee Facebook Rant as Grounds for Termination

For decades, the National Labor Relations Board has recognized boundaries on employees’ rights to engage in activity protected under federal labor laws. While employees have been granted leeway to engage in heated or...more

Calling Your Boss a “Nasty Mother F@#$%r” and Other Protected Activities

If an employee lashes out against a supervisor on social media with a string of obscenities, you can fire that employee, right? You would think so, but not always. Context matters....more

No, You Cannot Prohibit Employees from Protesting or Discussing Their Wages

A reminder to employers concerned about employees’ discussing their wages or acting in concert to petition for higher wages: This is legally protected activity that employers cannot prohibit or restrain. A recent National...more

Recent Case Reminds Schools of First Amendment and Title VII Responsibilities in Employment Context

Recently, the Northern District of Illinois issued its opinion in Wong v. Board of Education of Community Consolidated School District 15. Although the court’s decision does not address novel arguments or depart from prior...more

What You Didn’t Say Can Be Used Against You in a Court of Law: Perceived Speech is Not Protected Speech

What some might charitably consider a loophole in First Amendment protections of public employees received deferential treatment recently by the Third Circuit. ...more

A Mixed Cause of Action with Protected and Non-Protected Activity Not Subject to Anti-SLAPP Motion

In Baral v. Schnitt (filed 2/5/2015, No. B253620), the California Court of Appeal, Second Appellate District, held that California’s anti-SLAPP statute does not authorize the striking of allegations of protected activity in a...more

Facebook Post Lands Teacher in Hot Water

On January 18, 2015, two South Hills High School teachers were arrested for allegedly having sexual relations with students at the beach. According to the Orange County Sherriff’s Department, one of the teachers, Melody...more

Blog: Disclosure of employee litigation in periodic reports: between Scylla and Charybdis?

A recent case from the 7th circuit, Greengrass v. International Monetary Systems, Ltd., No. 13-2901, decided January 12, 2015, may be useful to keep in mind now that it’s 10-K season. ...more

NLRB Says Individual Gripes About Wages are "Inherently Concerted" Activity

Many employers consider it appropriate to discourage employees from discussing compensation with their coworkers. Particularly in non-unionized environments, employers may not think twice before disciplining employees for...more

LA County Employee’s Retaliation Claim Fails but Disability Bias Claim Moves Forward

Barseghyan v. County of Los Angeles, No. B249184 (November 20, 2014): A California Court of Appeal recently held that an employee whose new supervisors were unaware that she had filed a sexual harassment complaint in her...more

NLRB: Employees Have Right to use Employer’s Email for Union Organizing if Other Non-Business Use is Permitted

Today, the National Labor Relations Board held that employees have a right to use their employer’s communications systems – including email – for protected activity during non-working time, unless the employer prohibits all ...more

Higher burdens in SOX whistleblower retaliation claims - 5 tips for employers

Two recent decisions have clarified the heightened burden facing employers addressing whistleblower retaliation claims under Section 806 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act (SOX). On October 9, 2014, in Fordham v. Fannie Mae,...more

NLRB Rules That Employees Have Right to Organize Using Company Email

The National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) issued its decision in Purple Communications, Inc. & Communication Workers of America, AFL-CIO today, holding that employees who are given access to company email accounts have a...more

Employees Must Be Permitted to Use Their Employer Email Systems for Nonwork Purposes — Right to Wear Union Insignia Is Expanded

Reversing well established precedent, on December 11, 2014, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB or the Board) held that employees that have been given access to their employers’ email systems, must be permitted to use...more

NLRB Reverses Board Precedent on Employer Email Policies

On December 11, 2014, a divided National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) - split along party lines - overturned existing precedent regarding an employer’s right to control its email system, and held that employees have a...more

For Whom the Whistle Blows

In This Issue: - Applicability and Protected Activity - Procedure Governing Section 402 Claims - Five Steps to Compliance - For More Information - Excerpt from Applicability and Protected...more

Fifth Circuit Says Community Service Can Be Protected Religious Practice

Title VII requires employers to accommodate employees’ religious beliefs and practices. Understandably, courts are reluctant to make judicial determinations as to what are and what are not sincere religious activities. Last...more

NLRB Still “Likes” Expansive Employee Speech

Unlike many issues, it seems that at least one issue (so far) has the NLRB on the same page as a recent court decision: whether clicking “like” on Facebook amounts to substantive, protectable speech. In my earlier blog posts...more

Recent NLRB Decisions Condone Workplace Profanity and Insubordination - Employers Need to Know What Is Considered Protected...

An administrative law judge (ALJ) of the National Labor Relations Board (the "Board") recently found that a Hooters employee who cursed at her co-worker during an employee bikini contest was wrongfully terminated by her...more

NLRB's Recent Triple Play Decision Tackles Two Critical Social Media Issues for Employers

With the intersection between cutting-edge social media and the Depression-era National Labor Relations Act (NLRA or the Act) still relatively new, employers are looking for answers to some fundamental questions when it comes...more

Facebook "Like" Button - Protected Activity? It Depends on What You "Like"!

In an ever expanding arc of decisions that extends the NLRA’s protections to a wide range of employee conduct – both on-and off-duty, and in union and non-union settings alike – the NLRB last week decided that merely clicking...more

NLRB Expands Reach of NLRA by Finding Employee Who Sought Help From Coworkers For Her Sex Harassment Complaint Was Protected

In yet another case that impacts both union and non-union employers, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) recently found that an employee who asked coworkers for assistance in preserving evidence for a sex harassment...more

SCOTUS Affirms Right to Blow Your Whistle in Public Sector

There has long been tension in the public sector regarding an employee’s duties as an agent of the state and his or her right as an individual to freedom of speech. In a decision handed down in June of 2014, the United States...more

81 Results
|
View per page
Page: of 4

All the intelligence you need, in one easy email:

Great! Your first step to building an email digest of JD Supra authors and topics. Log in with LinkedIn so we can start sending your digest...

Sign up for your custom alerts now, using LinkedIn ›

* With LinkedIn, you don't need to create a separate login to manage your free JD Supra account, and we can make suggestions based on your needs and interests. We will not post anything on LinkedIn in your name.
×