Strict Scrutiny Standard

News & Analysis as of

Constitutionality of 8(a) Program Reaffirmed

Earlier this year, a judge of the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia reaffirmed the facial constitutionality of the 8(a) Program in response to a challenge by a small business owner, and he also rejected an...more

Eleventh Circuit Strikes Down Florida’s No-Surcharge Law

On November 4, 2015, the Eleventh Circuit struck down Florida’s no credit-card surcharge statute as unconstitutional under the First Amendment. See Dana’s Railroad Supply v. Attorney General, Florida, No. 14-14426, 2015 WL...more

Municipal Legal News: Volume 1, Number 2 November 2015

Employment Requirements for Building Officials - The Michigan Attorney General has interpreted a recent law requiring municipal building officials to be “employed” by a municipality to mean that building officials cannot...more

What Should Employers Expect During The New Supreme Court Term?

The first Monday in October is the traditional first day of a new U.S. Supreme Court term.  As always, the 2015-16 term will have several cases that are of particular interest to the nation’s employers.  Here is a review of...more

The Newest Sign for Some Sign Ordinances: Stop

Sign ordinances and regulations are a fixture of city and county zoning and land use regulations, designed to prevent unattractive clutter from obstructing the public view. In creating these regulations, however, local...more

Supreme Court Decides Two First Amendment Cases

Two recent Supreme Court decisions provide timely guidance on the First Amendment implications of publicly displaying the Confederate Flag or other symbols or signage related to protected beliefs. First, in Walker v. Sons of...more

Arizona Town's Content-Based Sign Rules Struck Down by U.S. Supreme Court

Local agencies urged to review sign codes in favor of content-neutral rules - The United States Supreme Court recently struck down portions of an Arizona town’s sign code that subjected ideological, political and...more

Supreme Court Strikes Down Ordinance Regulating Directional Signs

In the case of Reed v. Town of Gilbert, the United States Supreme Court recently issued a significant decision regarding municipal sign regulation The Town of Gilbert regulated signage differently based on the content of the...more

Government & Regulatory Law Update June 2015: United States Supreme Court Strikes Down Local Sign Ordinance: Content-Based...

Decades of case law demonstrates that differentiating based on content when regulating speech is an almost certain death knell. The line between content-based and content-neutral regulations, however, has often been hazy,...more

Signs Signs, Everywhere a Sign: U.S. Supreme Court Decides Reed v. Town of Gilbert

The Supreme Court of the United States handed down today an important First Amendment case concerning governments’ ability to regulate commonly displayed informational signs.  In Reed v. Town of Gilbert,...more

Reed v. Gilbert: Impact to municipalities across the nation

Although the case is outside the RLUIPA realm or even specific to religious-based speech, the Supreme Court’s decision last week in Reed v. Gilbert will undoubtedly impact RLUIPA Defense readers. We previously reported on the...more

Supreme Court Decides Reed v. Town of Gilbert

On June 18, 2015, the United States Supreme Court decided Reed v. Town of Gilbert, No. 13-502, holding that a municipal code subjecting signs to different regulations depending on whether the sign displayed an ideological...more

Lake County, Illinois “Hat Trick”* Defeats Religious Meditation House in Federal Suit

In MAUM Meditation House of Truth v. Lake County, Illinois, No. 13-cv-3794 (N.D. Ill. 2014), the United States District Court for the Northern District of Illinois ruled that Lake County, Illinois did not violate MAUM...more

Supreme Court Upholds Strict Scrutiny Standard In Affirmative Action

On June 24, 2013, the Supreme Court in Fisher v. University of Texas reaffirmed that the strict scrutiny standard of review applies when evaluating a university’s affirmative action admissions program. On these grounds, by a...more

The U.S. Department of Justice and Department of Education Release New Information About Using Race in Higher Education

On September 27, 2013, the U.S. Department of Justice and Department of Education released a document entitled “Questions and Answers About Fisher v. University of Texas at Austin.” This is the first guidance released by...more

Fisher Revisits "Strict Scrutiny" As Applied to Affirmative Action in College Admissions Programs

In an Opinion authored by Justice Anthony Kennedy for a 7-1 majority, the United States Supreme Court in Fisher v. University of Texas at Austin, et al., allowed public colleges and universities to retain their affirmative...more

Reactions to Fisher: Grutter Survives, for now—But What About Title VI?

As we and just about everyone else have noted, Justice Kennedy, writing for a 7-to-1 majority of the Supreme Court of the United States, sent the hot potato Fisher case back to the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals to “assess...more

The Impact Of Fisher v. Texas On Race-Conscious Assignment Decisions In K-12 Schools

The big news this week in education is the U.S. Supreme Court’s 7-1 decision in Fisher v. University of Texas. In Fisher, the Court held that the lower court should not have taken at face value the University’s claim that it...more

Supreme Court tells Fifth Circuit to "Do-Over"

On Monday, the United States Supreme Court issued its decision in the affirmative action case of Fisher v. University of Texas at Austin. In a 7-1 decision (Justice Kagan recused herself because she had previously worked on...more

Supreme Court Approves Affirmative Action In College Admissions, But Remands For Additional Analysis Of Admissions Process

Justice Kennedy, in an opinion joined by Chief Justice Roberts and Justices Alito, Scalia, Thomas, Breyer, and Sotomayor, wrote that public universities’ race-conscious admissions policies are constitutionally permissible and...more

Fisher v. University of Texas: Considerations Of Race In Admissions Survive, Subject To Strict Judicial Scrutiny

In Fisher v. University of Texas, the U.S. Supreme Court left intact the core principle, embodied in its earlier decisions, that college and university admissions policies and practices that give consideration to an...more

A Summary of the U.S. Supreme Court Decisions This Week Which Will Affect Employers

Windsor v. United States - Issue: Can the federal government define marriage? Holding: No. Loser: The federal Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA), which was passed in 1996 and signed by President Clinton, was...more

Supreme Court Rules that Lower Courts Failed to Apply Rigorous Enough Scrutiny to Racial Classification in Higher Education...

In a 7-1 opinion, the United States Supreme Court concluded in Fisher v. Univ. of Texas, No. 11-345 (June 24, 2013) that lower courts had failed to apply a rigorous enough scrutiny to the University of Texas' use of racial...more

Supreme Court Issues Important Affirmative Action And Employment Law Decisions

This week the Supreme Court issued three decisions that may significantly impact federal contractors and other employers: In Fisher v. University of Texas, No. 11-345 (U.S. June 24, 2013), the Supreme Court held that a...more

Supreme Court Reinforces Strict Standard of Review of Affirmative Action Programs

In Fisher v. University of Texas, No. 11-345 (U.S. June 24, 2013), the Supreme Court vacated the Fifth Circuit's decision upholding a university's affirmative action plan that considered race as one of the factors in its...more

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