Fair Labor Standards Act The United States Department of Labor

The Fair Labor Standards Act is a United States federal statute enacted in 1938 to promote fair labor conditions and protect workers from abusive treatment. The primary features of the FLSA address excessive... more +
The Fair Labor Standards Act is a United States federal statute enacted in 1938 to promote fair labor conditions and protect workers from abusive treatment. The primary features of the FLSA address excessive working hours, child labor, unpaid overtime and unsafe working conditions.  less -
News & Analysis as of

9th Circuit Splits with 4th, 5th Circuits, Finds Auto Dealer Service Advisors Not Exempt Under FLSA

Reversing a district court decision, and declining to follow decisions from a number of other courts, including the Fourth and Fifth Circuits, the Ninth Circuit has deferred to the Department of Labor's (DOL) "flip-flopped"...more

10 Tips for Avoiding Unpaid Intern Lawsuits

A television network recently agreed to pay $7.2 million to settle a class action lawsuit filed by former interns claiming violations of the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) and state statutes. This represents one of the...more

Court Rules That Payment Of Overtime Wages Pursuant To A Department Of Labor Audit Does Not Preclude Affected Employees From...

Obtaining a valid waiver of minimum wage or overtime claims under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) continues to be tricky. Section 216(c) of the FLSA requires that a valid waiver must be “supervised” by the U.S. Department...more

Ninth Circuit Defers to DOL View that Automobile Service Advisors Have No Industry Overtime Exemption

When taking in your car to the dealership for repairs, you are usually greeted by a service advisor. Service advisors compile information needed for the mechanic to diagnose and repair the vehicle. They also provide cost...more

Still Waiting for Those New Proposed FLSA Overtime Regulations

You may recall that over a year ago, President Obama directed the Secretary of Labor to “modernize and streamline” the existing Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) overtime regulations, specifically with respect to the “white...more

Proposed FLSA Exemption Changes Still In Limbo

Employers await with bated breath the release of the U.S. Labor Department's proposed new definitions for the federal Fair Labor Standards Act's Section 13(a)(1) executive, administrative, professional, outside-sales, and...more

DOL Secretary Tells Congress New FLSA Regulations Are Delayed, Outlines Department Priorities

Last week, Secretary of Labor Thomas Perez testified during a hearing held by the House Education and Workforce Committee to discuss President Obama’s budget proposal for the Department of Labor. Secretary Perez’s testimony...more

FLSA lawsuits on the rise

Statistics released earlier this month by the Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts show an 8.8% increase in the number of Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”) cases in the year ending in September 2014 as compared to the...more

U.S. Supreme Court Upholds Validity of Department of Labor’s Interpretation on Overtime Pay for Mortgage Loan Officers

For the past several years, an action by the Mortgage Bankers Association has been brewing in the courts challenging the U.S. Department of Labor (“DOL”) for issuing contradictory opinion letters on whether mortgage loan...more

Supreme Court Ruling Validates DOL’s 2010 Interpretation Regarding FLSA Status of Mortgage-Loan Officers

The Supreme Court recently rejected a challenge to the validity of a 2010 interpretation by the U.S. Department of Labor (the “DOL”), which had concluded that the administrative exemption of the Fair Labor Standards Act...more

Supreme Court Rules That Agency Interpretive Rules Are Not Subject to Notice-and-Comment Rulemaking

Recently, the Supreme Court issued a unanimous judgment that government agency "interpretive rules" are not subject to notice-and-comment rulemaking, but cautioned that those same rules do not carry the "force and effect of...more

Supreme Court Ruling Makes Mortgage Loan Officers Eligible for Overtime Pay

Federal agencies now have the authority to interpret their own rules. On March 9, 2015, in Perez v. Mortgage Bankers Ass’n, No. 13-1041, slip op. (U.S. Mar. 9, 2015), the United States Supreme Court effectively gave...more

"No Opinion Letters" Policy Reaffirmed

From the federal Fair Labor Standards Act's inception in 1938, employers sought, and officials of the U.S. Labor Department's Wage and Hour Division provided, official written explanations of how that law works in particular...more

New FLSA Regulations Set to be Released in First Quarter of 2015 Likely to Change America’s Overtime Pay Landscape

In March 2014, President Obama issued an Executive Order directing the Secretary of Labor to “update and modernize” the overtime exemption rules under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), (the “Act”), 29 U.S.C. 201 et seq., a...more

U.S. Supreme Court Holds Agency Interpretations Are Not Subject To Notice-and-Comment Rulemaking Requirement

In 2004, the DOL revamped its regulations regarding the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) administrative exemption. In 2006, the Bush DOL issued an opinion letter finding that mortgage loan officers qualified for the...more

Potential New Salary Minimum for Exempt Employees

The test for classifying employees as exempt from the Fair Labor Standards Act’s overtime requirements may be briefly summarized as follows: the employee must be paid on a salary basis (i.e., receive the same base salary...more

Supreme Court Grants Federal Agencies Wide Discretion in Interpreting Regulations

On March 9, the Supreme Court unanimously ruled that the Administrative Procedure Act (APA) does not require federal agencies to go through the formal rulemaking process when making changes to rules interpreting regulations,...more

U.S. Supreme Court Notice, Comment Not Required for Federal Agencies Interpreting Regulations

The U.S. Supreme Court decided in Perez v. Mortgage Bankers Association that federal agencies are not required to use the Administrative Procedure Act's (APA) notice and comment procedures when issuing or making changes to...more

Mortgage Loan Officers are Not Exempt Employees per the DOL and the Supreme Court Says that is Okay

The legal ping-pong match between the Department of Labor (DOL) and the Mortgage Bankers Association (MBA) over whether mortgage loan officers are eligible for overtime appears to be at an end. The Supreme Court recently...more

Keep an Eye on Executive Orders and Presidential Memoranda for Key Employment Initiatives in 2015

With Republicans in control of both the Senate and the House of Representatives, the showdown between President Obama and Congress on the labor and employment front promises to continue into 2015. Expect to see the...more

Who Needs Rules? The DOL Wins Supreme Court Battle In Mortgage Loan Officer Administrator Interpretation vs. Rule Making

When a federal agency deviates significantly in its historic interpretation of a regulation – in this case, doing a complete 180° on whether mortgage loan officers are exempt from overtime under the Fair Labor Standards Act –...more

Can Mortgage Loan Officers Still be Exempt from FLSA Overtime Requirements?

On March 9, 2015, the United States Supreme Court issued an opinion upholding a 2010 Department of Labor (DOL) interpretative rule finding that mortgage loan officers are generally not administratively exempt from Fair Labor...more

Supreme Court Sides with DOL and Overturns Longstanding DC Circuit Ruling Under Administrative Procedure Act

Perez v. Mortgage Bankers Assn., No. 13 1041: On Monday, March 9, 2015, the Court ruled that a longstanding decision from the DC Circuit under the Administrative Procedure Act (“APA”) was incorrectly decided in contravention...more

Supreme Court Sides with the DOL Regarding Interpretative Rules

In a unanimous decision on Monday, March 9, 2015, the United States Supreme Court gave the Department of Labor (DOL) broad discretion to revise interpretive guidance with little notice. ...more

U.S. Supreme Court Holds That DOL May Change Interpretations of Regulations Without Public Notice and Comment

On March 9, 2015, the United States Supreme Court ruled unanimously in two consolidated cases that a federal agency does not have to go through the formal rulemaking process, which includes providing public notice and an...more

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