Family Medical Leave Act ADAAA

The Family Medical Leave Act is a United States federal statute enacted in 1993 to protect employees from negative employment consequences associated with family illness. The FMLA allows covered employees to take... more +
The Family Medical Leave Act is a United States federal statute enacted in 1993 to protect employees from negative employment consequences associated with family illness. The FMLA allows covered employees to take up to twelve weeks of unpaid, job-protected leave, in order to care for a qualified family member or address a personal medical issue.   Situations covered under the Act include: birth of a child and care of a newborn; placement of an adopted or foster child; serious illness of an employee's spouse, child or parent;  serious illness of the employee that affects ability to perform his/her job; situations arising out of an employee's spouse, child or parent's active military service. Employees who take leave to care for a seriously injured family servicemember are eligible for longer periods of covered leave.  less -
News & Analysis as of

ADAAA Expanded Ability of Parents to Take FMLA Leave for Disabled Adult Son or Daughter

Human resource professionals occasionally receive requests from employees to take FMLA leave to care for an adult son or daughter with an alleged serious health condition. Some of the most frequent requests involve FMLA time...more

Pregnant Employees Become the Subject of Heightened Attention and New Legislation

Over the past decade, the number of claims pregnant workers have filed with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (“EEOC”) has risen by almost 50 percent, according to the National Women’s Law Center (“NWLC”). Most of...more

Top Ten Policies Every Employee Handbook Should Have

An Employee Handbook is a critical communication tool that sets forth corporate goals, policies and objectives as well as the expectations demanded of employees....more

Labor Letter, February 2013: Reintegrating Your Workplace Warriors

Over the past decade, we have seen the largest military deployment since World War II. Our troops are now withdrawn from Iraq, and thousands more are scheduled to return from Afghanistan over the course of 2013. By the end...more

New Department of Labor Interpretation on FMLA Leave for Adult Children

On January 14, 2013, The Department of Labor issued a new interpretation that clarifies its position on the ability of employees to take leave under the FMLA to care for an adult child who has a disabling medical condition....more

DOL Issues Guidance On Definition Of "Son Or Daughter" Under FMLA

The Department of Labor (DOL) recently issued additional guidance to employers regarding the definition of “son or daughter” under the Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA) as it relates to an adult child. Under the FMLA, an...more

Employment Law: Don't Mess with Mama -The DOL Issues Guidance on FMLA for Adult Children

On January 14, 2013 the DOL issued guidance on FMLA leave for adult children. Pursuant to the Family and Medical Leave Act, parents of an adult child have been previously able to take FMLA for a child who is incapable of...more

DOL Offers Guidance on FMLA Rights for Adult Children

All covered employers know that the FMLA entitles an eligible employee to take up to 12 weeks of unpaid, job-protected leave during a 12-month period to care for a “son or daughter” with a serious health condition. While most...more

DOL Clarifies Definition of “Son or Daughter” Under FMLA

The U.S. Department of Labor’s (DOL) Wage and Hour Division issued an Administrator’s Interpretation on January 14, 2013, clarifying the definition of “son or daughter” under the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) as it...more

Legal Alert: Department Of Labor Issues New Guidance Clarifying FMLA Qualifying Leave

The Department of Labor (DOL) has clarified the definition of "son or daughter" to now permit an eligible employee to take leave under the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) to care for an adult child who is incapable of...more

The Department of Labor Provides Clarification as to When Employees Can Use FMLA Leave to Care for Adult Children

Regarding situation (1) above, the DOL states that although the 26 weeks of “injured service member care leave” can only be used once per service member for the same illness or injury, employees also would be eligible to use...more

DOL Issues Guidance On "Caring For An Adult Child" Under The FMLA

Yesterday, the U.S. Department of Labor issued an Administrator's Interpretation (AI) to clarify the factors an employer must consider when an employee requests leave to care for an adult child. ...more

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